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The World Beyond BetterMost => The Culture Tent => Topic started by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 08:52:02 am

Title: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 08:52:02 am
This is an article about a new film which I'm really interested to see after reading this ... it's about an Ozzie guy named Peter Norman

Who is he?

He was the other guy on the Olympic podium in October 1968 when Tommie Smith and John Carlos did their Black Power Salute.

It's the story of what happened to him following that incident.

(http://news.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/spl/hi/pop_ups/08/magazine_enl_1224239304/img/1.jpg)


(From BBC News Magazine)

The other man on the podium

By Caroline Frost

When Tommie Smith and John Carlos gave a gloved Black Power salute on the Olympic podium in October 1968 it sent a shockwave through sport. But what happened to the other man on the platform?

Forty years ago, two black Americans, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, won gold and bronze medals in the 200m final at the Mexico Olympics, and used their time on the victory podium to protest with a Black Power salute.

The photograph of the two men with their heads bowed, each of them with an arm raised in the air and a fist clothed in a black leather glove, is one of the most striking images of the 20th Century.

Their actions caused havoc at the Games, ensuring the pair were ejected from the US Olympic team. But three men won medals in that race, and the consequences for the third athlete on the podium would be every bit as significant.

The silver medallist was a laid-back Australian, an up-and-coming runner called Peter Norman who, in the words of his coach, "blossomed like a cactus" when he got to Mexico. While observers expected the Americans to make a clean sweep of the 200m medals, Norman kept them interested by breaking the world record in the heats.

An apprentice butcher from Melbourne, he had learned to run in a pair of borrowed spikes. More significantly, he had grown up in a Salvation Army family, with a set of simple but strong values instilled from an early age.

As his nephew Matt Norman, director of the new film, Salute, remembers: "The whole Norman family were brought up in the Salvos, so we knew we had to look after our fellow man, but that was about it."

In Mexico, that was enough for Norman, who felt compelled to join forces with his fellow athletes in their stand against racial inequality.

The three were waiting for the victory ceremony when Norman discovered what was about to happen. It was Norman who, when John Carlos found he'd forgotten his black gloves, suggested the two runners shared Smith's pair, wearing one each on the podium.

And when, to the crowd's astonishment, they flung their fists in the air, the Australian joined the protest in his own way, wearing a badge from the Olympic Project for Human Rights that they had given him.

The repercussions for Norman were immediate. Seen as a trouble-maker who had lent a hand to those desecrators of the Olympic flag, he was ostracised by the Australian establishment. Despite qualifying 13 times over and being ranked fifth in the world, he was not sent to the following Munich games, where Australia had no sprinter for the first time in the Olympics. Norman retired soon afterwards without winning another title.

Sydney hope

Divorce and ill health all weighed down on him over the next few years. He suffered depression, drank heavily and grew addicted to painkillers after a lengthy hospital stay. During that time, he used his silver medal as a door-stop.

One of the things that kept him going was the hope that he would be welcomed and recognised at the Sydney Olympics. As his nephew puts it: "Then his life would have come full circle."

He was to be disappointed. In 2000, Peter Norman found himself the only Australian Olympian to be excluded from making a VIP lap of honour at the Games, despite his status as one of the best sprinters in the home country's history.

But the US athletics team were not going to ignore this omission. They invited Norman to stay at their own lodgings during the games, and welcomed him as one of their own. In an extraordinary turn of events, it was hurdling legend Ed Moses who greeted him at the door, and that year's 200m champion Michael Johnson who hugged him, saying: "You are my hero."

In 2004, Peter's nephew Matt started work on Salute, a documentary that, for the first time, brought all three athletes together in a room to tell their story of that day in Mexico.

Two years later, Peter had just seen the film for the first time and was about to embark on a publicity tour to the US when he had a heart attack and died. Tommie Smith and John Carlos, to whom he had always stayed close, travelled to Melbourne to act as pallbearers at his funeral, and remember their friend.

Empty place

"Peter didn't have to take that button [badge], Peter wasn't from the United States, Peter was not a black man, Peter didn't have to feel what I felt, but he was a man," says Carlos.

"He was that committed, and I didn't know that," adds Smith.

In 2004, a 23ft statue honouring Smith and Carlos was erected in San Jose State University. This huge replica shows each of them with their fists in the air, just as they stood four decades ago in Mexico.

The place for the silver medallist is empty. It is where students and tourists stand to have their picture taken, when they want to take their place in sporting history.

In the film now being shown all over Australia, the absent athlete reflects on his legacy.

"I'm a firm believer that in a victory ceremony for the Olympics, there's three guys that stand up there, each one's been given about a square metre of God's earth to stand on, and what any one of the three choose to do with his little square metre at that stage is entirely up to him.

"If it hadn't been for that demonstration on that day, it would have just been another silver medal that Australia picked up along the line. No one would ever have heard of Peter Norman."

The film Salute is now on release in Australia, and being shown at various film festivals around the world.

Send us your comments using the form below.

I have seen the monument at SJSU, and while there is no representation of Mr Norman on the silver medal platform, it is not inappropriate. I remember being told of his alliance to the US athletes when I was young and when you stand in his place at the monument, you get a sense that he represented the best role model for the "everyman." In some ways, his alliance in that moment is an example we should all copy.
Tina, Arkansas, US

As an Australian it makes me sad that I've never heard about Peter until today. He is an example of someone who has true empathy for others - I wish we'd had a chance to applaud him during his life
Cat, London

I must say this piece really touched me, it shows how the real outlook to humanity was. That singular act by Peter Norman did not just bring him to public notice, but actually showed we had good men back then who really didn't mind about difference in race, and empathised with others in what they passed through. I never knew this part of history. I think the statue that depicts the two Americans should be modified to include Peter Norman somehow.
Kelechi Kehinde Uguru, Lagos, Nigeria

There seems something slightly inappropriate about the monument omitting Norman - it is a statue celebrating standing up for equality, but scrubbing the man who is thought not quite as equal as the others.
William, Cambridge, UK

One hopes the film Salute will lead to the recognition Peter Norman deserves and to the righting of this wrong, albeit posthumously. The Olympics are supposed to be apolitical but the Chinese games were a political showpiece - though not to rival Berlin's in 1936 when Jesse Owens showed up Hitler's claims of Aryan superiority. To punish Peter Norman is a stain on the Olympic Movement. Perhaps Boris Johnson should sanction a ceremony to commemorate Peter Norman at the 2012 games. Australia House is in Trafalgar Square and there is a vacant plinth. A sculpture with all three athletes could be put there for the duration of the games.
John Greenwood, Loughborough

Wow - that's brought a tear to my eye and a lump to my throat. A true hero for our times, making a small, simple yet mighty protest. He should not be forgotten.
Simon Cope, High Wycombe, UK

From a country that has such a diverse cultural and ethnic community, the Australian Olympic Committee should be truly ashamed.
Ian Marshall, Manchester

People should be careful how they conduct themselves when representing their country. Something that a lot of international sportsmen and women all too easily forget. The moment you accept the invitation to wear that jersey, and represent your nation, you must accept that your personal views are no longer your primary objective. I have great respect for men and women who stand up for their beliefs, but I wonder how much more Mr Norman could have achieved if he had become a spokesperson for the subject and used his fame from the Olympics as a springboard, rather than ending his career (albeit unfairly) under a shadow.
John Turnbull, Derby, England, UK

I'm a black American and have been to Australia at least a dozen times. Australia is trying very hard to wipe out its racist history which is similar to the US. Peter was good man who suffered because Australia did not want to offend America. Rest in peace, Peter.
Ormond J Gilbert, Goose Creek, SC, US

I was chuffed to read this and see how a Christian upbringing sensitised this brave Aussie to support the other two.
Tony F, Worthing, England


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/magazine/7674157.stm

Published: 2008/10/17 09:11:46 GMT

© BBC MMVIII
Title: Re: The other man on the podium
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 08:53:20 am
At the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games the enduring image was Tommie Smith and John Carlos, the African American athletes raising their gloved clenched fists in support of the Black Panther movement during the Star Spangled Banner, they were subsequently banned from the Games for life. This film looks at what inspired them to make their protest, and what happened to them after the Games. (In 6 parts making a 50 minute documentary)

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbeDDfc-gwM[/youtube]

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAWHUvpjfWw&feature=related[/youtube]

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIAY_BQ4CiU&feature=related[/youtube]

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE0gn70tw50&feature=related[/youtube]

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf8z8KuHr9Y&feature=related[/youtube]

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HII8OkXdZls&feature=related[/youtube]



Title: Re: The other man on the podium
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 08:55:25 am
One of 2008's biggest documentary films is about to be unleashed onto screens Worldwide. SALUTE is a film by Matt Norman, the nephew of 200m Silver Medalist Peter Norman who was involved in one of the most powerful moments in Olympic history where Tommie Smith and John Carlos gave their Black Power Salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Being released through Paramount Pictures and Transmission films in Australia on the 24th of July 2008, and then around the world shortly after Salute promises to be a wake up to what's happening today especially with the 2008 Beijing Olympics just around the corner.

Production Company
Salute The Movie Pty Ltd - Matt Norman
The Actors Cafe Pty Ltd
www.theactorscafe.com

Writer: Matt Norman
Director: Matt Norman
Producer: Matt Norman

Paramount Pictures
Transmission Films

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KehurGWpYBU[/youtube]
Title: Re: The other man on the podium
Post by: Penthesilea on October 18, 2008, 09:46:46 am
Thanks for posting this info Kelda.


Of course I've read about the going ons at the 68 Olympics and of course I know the pictures and at least part of the story behind it. I even remember my husband and me talking briefly about how the third man fit into the picture and what his thoughts/positions might have been. I'm glad to get to know how supportive he was.

But I've never heard the name Peter Norman. Never-ever was he anywhere mentioned when I saw the pic/read about it.
Which is a shame as I now think. So thanks again for posting this interesting piece.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 09:50:30 am
I've now added the other 5 parts of the black salute power documentary - I haven't got through it all yet so not sure how much it mentions peter norman but I think its a real shame he wasn't recognised...  even in the 2000 Sydney Games ....  :-\

I'm going to try and look for the salute documentary today as I'd really like to see it.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium
Post by: Front-Ranger on October 18, 2008, 10:14:43 am
"Peter didn't have to take that button [badge], Peter wasn't from the United States, Peter was not a black man, Peter didn't have to feel what I felt, but he was a man," says Carlos.

What an awesome article. I would love to see the documentary. Documentary films have been getting so interesting in recent years. I just saw "Man on Wire" about Phillip Petit and his tightrope walk between the Twin Towers of the WTC. It was excellent.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 10:41:04 am
The 50 minute documentary mentions Peter briefly - about a minute is devoted to him.

I also learned that Peter when alive had said he was not upset at being left out of the statue at San Jose State University. He spoke at the unveiling and said he believed it to be the proudest day of his life - that anyone can stand up and get their photo taken in his shoes. That anyone could take a part in this event that sent a message to the World.

(http://img.groundspeak.com/waymarking/display/da3fcc9e-f483-4e11-b4cb-73f95cba8498.jpg)
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 02:45:54 pm
I changed the title of this thread a little incase people think it wad about the election.  ;)

I have spent the day trying to find somewhere in UK showing this or a DVD or even a sneaky torrent version but to no avail.

Ozzie Brokies...

Katie? Kerry? Have you seen Salute? If so, what did you think?
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Lynne on October 18, 2008, 03:22:25 pm
Thanks for posting about this, Kelda.  I am a bit chagrined that I did not have any knowledge of this event.

I will also recommend it to a friend who is a major fan of documentary film.

Lynne
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kelda on October 18, 2008, 03:46:42 pm
From Matt Norman's wiki page.

Quote
Matt Norman's next project, 1968, is now becoming one of the most highly anticipated films of the decade. Salute is the documentary film that uncovers the truth of what actually happened in Mexico whereas 1968 will be the drama version of the event. Norman is expected to gather some of the best talent in the world to recreate this story on film. Matt has already started speaking with Hollywood's top A-List stars to play the roles of Tommie Smith, John Carlos and his uncle Peter Norman. With David Williamson, one of Australia's leading writers, attached to write the screenplay this will be a very ambitious film project to follow up on the success of Salute.

You can also visit http://www.salutethemovie.com/HOME.html

Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Katie77 on October 19, 2008, 05:39:32 pm
Kelda, I honestly have never heard the story of Peter Norman, and cant even remember it being mentioned back in 1968 (but I was only 16 then and may not have taken any notice).

I just asked my hubby if he knew about him, and he did know a little bit, but not the whole story.

Back then, without satellite TV and live news telecasts from overseas, I think us Aussies were a little bit naieve as to the goings on in the black movements in America. To tell you the truth, my vague thoughts on what happened back then when i heard about or read about those black men raising their arms, I thought they were radicals, bad people, who should not have used the Olympics to protest, whatever they were protesting.  I dont ever remember reading that an Australian was there.

At that time the Australian Government was hand in hand with the American government. Our prime minister of the time made the slogan ALL THE WAY WITH LBJ.....we were fighting in the Vietnam War along side Americans.

I am glad that that film documentary has come out, and I hope Australians will now see  The whole event in a more positive way and feel proud of that man Peter Norman for standing up for what he believed in.

I have not seen the documentary or even heard of it, it is not likely to be shown at theatres here in the town I live in, but maybe Kerry or Rob have seen it advertised in Sydney. Hopefully it will be shown on TV, and more Aussies will get to know the story.

I have copied the story you have here in your fiirst post, and intend to email it to all my Aussie friends and ask them to forward it on, so hopefully more Aussies will become aware of what did happen back then.

Thank you for tellling me the story of PETER NORMAN.

I look forward to hearing from Kerry and Rob to see what they knew or read about the events.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kelda on October 19, 2008, 05:49:34 pm
Thanks for replying Sue!

Its intersting that many fo the reals Auzzies hadn';t hear about poor Peter, he got a really raw deal from the Oz olympic committee

I didn'r know about the Ozzies being with USA with regards to the Vietnam American War. It's sad to say but I know little about it.. its not something we covered at school even though I did history to a high level at school.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Katie77 on October 19, 2008, 06:26:45 pm
Thanks for replying Sue!

Its intersting that many fo the reals Auzzies hadn';t hear about poor Peter, he got a really raw deal from the Oz olympic committee

I didn'r know about the Ozzies being with USA with regards to the Vietnam American War. It's sad to say but I know little about it.. its not something we covered at school even though I did history to a high level at school.


I dont want to lose the topic of this important thread, so I wont elaborate too much......but I am just as amazed that you didn't know that much about the Vietnam War.

It was a huge part of our lives back then, our friends were being drafted or enlisting in the army,  and shipped off to war, and even now, those friends are  in their early sixties and some still feeling the affects it had on them. To think now, that it may be taught as "history" lessons, when it is still something real to people today, is quite amazing.

Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kelda on October 19, 2008, 06:33:02 pm
I dont want to lose the topic of this important thread, so I wont elaborate too much......but I am just as amazed that you didn't know that much about the Vietnam War.

It was a huge part of our lives back then, our friends were being drafted or enlisting in the army,  and shipped off to war, and even now, those friends are  in their early sixties and some still feeling the affects it had on them. To think now, that it may be taught as "history" lessons, when it is still something real to people today, is quite amazing.

heh, I'm just a baba! Obviously I know the very basics, eg have seen this image plenty of times..

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d4/TrangBang.jpg)


but I didn't know (or at least didn't remeber that the Ozzies were allies - I must do more reading about vietnam.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kerry on October 19, 2008, 06:51:56 pm
but I didn't know (or at least didn't remeber that the Ozzies were allies - I must do more reading about vietnam.

Many beautiful, young Australian boys lost their lives in the wretched Vietnam War. They had no choice in the matter. They were draftees. The had to go, whether they wanted to or not. It was a despicable time in Australian history.    :'(

(I have heard about the documentary, "Salute." Will respond shortly.)
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: underdown on October 19, 2008, 07:21:53 pm
The whole story sounds like more American politics again.
I agree, that the Olympics should not be used as a political platform.
It was very courageous of Peter Norman to support the other two medal winners, and to take a stand with them against the inhumanity towards black Americans, but there was a lot he could have done outside of the Olympics.
I had heard about Peter Norman, as I once knew one of his relatives, but haven't heard of 'Salute'. It seems to be an American film, made by an American studio, with Hollywood actors (I don't know if an American actor played the part of Peter Norman, 'though).
It's sad that Peter Norman was left out of the sculpture, but not surprising.
The war in Vietnam, whilst it was argued by our Government as being in our interests to stop the spread of communism, was very unpopular among many people here, and seen as belonging to America. (And I'd better not mention Iraq, or the current world-wide economic crisis).
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Katie77 on October 19, 2008, 07:39:14 pm
Well.......I wasn't expecting that reply from you Rob. But.......I can see you have a strong opinion about it.

Its amazing though, how those shiney arses on the Olympic Committee have revolved though.

Remember Cathy Freeman, running around the Olympic stadium, with both the Australian flag and the Aboriginal flag. The OIC made a hero of her.

Whether we like the Olympics being used for political reasons or not, its gonna happen. The opportunity to get full exposure to billions of people is too much for some people to resist. 

But in some instances it was tragic, as in the Munich games.

Done in a peaceful and non harmful way, my opinion is that they have the right to do it, whether it be at the Olympics or anywhere else they want.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kerry on October 19, 2008, 11:03:50 pm

I remembered recently seeing "Salute" reviewed on the ABCTV program, "At the Movies."

It was reviewed by two of Australia's most respected movie reviewers, Margaret Pomeranz and David Stratton.

Margaret gave it a score of 3 out of 5 (standard) and David gave it 2 out of 5 (low), with an overall score of 5 out of 10, which represents a low score. By comparison, both Margaret and David gave Brokeback Mountain 5 out of 5 each = 10 out of 10, with Margaret commenting that she considered BBM to be "a perfect movie."

Here's the "Salute" review transcript from "The Movie Show":

SALUTE

Review by Margaret Pomeranz

A new Australian documentary looks back at an iconic moment in Olympic history that had an impact on the world but, more significantly, on the people involved.

Itís SALUTE, about that famous Black Power salute at the Mexico Olympics in 1968 when American track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos stood on the podium to receive their medals for coming first and third in the 200 metre dash. It was a moment when politics, sport and race converged.

The second place getter at the event was the Australian Peter Norman, who in sympathy with his fellow athletes also wore an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge. All three athletes would be ostracised by their countries for their actions.

The documentary, which was made by Peter Normanís nephew Matt Norman, is fascinating as it delves into the history of that moment. Itís a reminder of how the world was only forty years ago.

And itís shocking how that moment affected the sporting careers of all three. Where the film falters is in its latter half when Matt Norman, in trying to laud his uncle for his courage, loses perspective.

The film becomes repetitive and adulatory, diminishing its impact, but for much of its length it is a fascinating insight into a moment that illuminated the Civil Rights movement in America.

Further comments . . . .

MARGARET: David?

DAVID: I think the problem I have with this film is that there's about 20 minutes worth of really solid, interesting documentary material and the rest is padding. I think the gesture that Peter Norman made in wearing that badge may have been a brave one at the time, but it's kind of almost lost in the process of the much bigger demonstration, of course, made by the two African American finalists.

And the key thing is that, as he says as we saw in those clips, that he was then not allowed to go onto the next Olympic Games after that.

Now, that would have made, to concentrate on that would have perhaps made an interesting film, but this film is so padded. I think you're right. I think Matt Norman is too close to it. I think a more objective point of view would have been better because, as it goes on, it keeps cutting away to irrelevant speeches and more speeches and...

MARGARET: Yeah.

DAVID: You know, you say, "Get to the point," you know.

MARGARET: No. No, that latter part of the documentary is sort of like really hard going. Hard going.

DAVID: It's leaden. It really is leaden.

MARGARET: And it's such a shame because I think there is interesting stuff in there.

DAVID: Yeah.
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Katie77 on October 19, 2008, 11:48:44 pm
Interesting reading that Kerry......

If nothing else, the movie has brought out the story of Peter Norman, and for many Australians, told us a story about someone who does have a place in Olympic and Australian history and deserves to be recognised.

Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kerry on October 20, 2008, 12:13:23 am

Found the following obituary online:

OBITUARY

PETER NORMAN (15 Jun 1942 - 3 Oct 2006)


Peter Norman, one of Australia's greatest ever male sprinters passed away after suffering a major heart attack. He is best remembered as the man standing quietly on the victory dais at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics as American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos made their now famous 'Black Power' salute protesting the racial inequalities in USA society towards African Americans.

Peter supported their protest by wearing a Human Rights badge during the victory ceremony which brought him censure from 'the powers to be' but nowhere suffering the consequences that Smith and Carlos had to endure. The Olympic 200 metres final was Peter's greatest race as he split the Americans to win silver in 20.06 seconds, a National record that still stands today.

Peter first came to prominence as an athlete when he won the Victorian junior 220 yards title in 1960 in 22.2 seconds. Peter left his original club Collingwood Harriers and joined the East Melbourne Harriers where former quarter-miler Neville Sillitoe had gathered a formidable sprint group which was to dominate sprinting not only in Victoria but also Australia over the next decade or more.

In 1962 Peter was a semi-finalist in the 220 yards in the British Empire and Commonwealth Games, Perth in 22.03 seconds. However progress was slow after 1963 when injuries hampered his preparations for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Disqualified in the heats of the National 220 yards ended any slim hopes he had for selection.

His determination and training with fellow sprint champions Gary Holdsworth and Greg Lewis saw him make the team for the 1966 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Kingston, Jamaica after winning his first National title. Peter was a quarter-finalist in the 100 yards in 10.27 seconds and again semi-finalist in the 220 yards in 21.2 seconds. He anchored the sprint relay team to a bronze medal and also ran a leg of the 4x440 yards final when Gary Eddy was forced to withdraw. The team finished 5th.

Peter won his 3rd successive National 200 title in 1968 and was selected for the Mexico Olympics. He was in brilliant form and ran a personal best 10.3 seconds for the 100 metres and 20.3 seconds for the 200 metres in a pre-meet giving a glimpse of what was to come. He cruised through the heats and quarter-finals winning in 20.23 and 20.44 seconds. He was 2nd behind world record holder John Carlos in his semi-final in 20.22 seconds.

Running from lane 6 in the final Peter was 3rd off the turn but continued his drive to the tape passing Carlos to finish 2nd in 20.06 seconds behind Tommie Smith's new world record of 19.83 seconds. Whilst the rarefied atmosphere of Mexico City helped to produce fast times the performance was extraordinary as Peter was not considered a finals prospect prior to the Games, and his result is still the best ever by an Australian male sprinter in the Olympics. His time would have won him gold in the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

The now famous victory ceremony has become immortalised with a 20 foot tall statue erected at San Jose State University where Smith and Carlos were students. It was unveiled in October 2005 with Peter in attendance. It also cemented a life long friendship for the three athletes who have had a number of reunions over the passing years.

In 1969 Peter ran in the inaugural Pacific Conference Games in Tokyo winning the 200 metres in 21.0 seconds and finished 4th in the 100 metres in 10.8 seconds. He was also a member of the winning sprint relay team.

Peter won his 5th consecutive National 200 metres title in 1970 and was selected for the 1970 Edinburgh British Empire and Commonwealth Games where he finished 5th in the 200 metres in 20.86 seconds.

He continued his career to 1972 hoping to make the Munich Olympic team but failed to gain selection after finishing 3rd in the Nationals in Perth. He then retired from top level athletics.

Peter was predominantly a 200 metres runner but did finish 2nd in the National 100 metres in 1969. He avoided the 400 metres as best he could, but loved doing other events on Saturday�s inter-clubs doing high jumps and javelins amongst other events. Peter also loved Australian Rules football and played in his younger days.

Peter was a PE teacher by profession and enjoyed amateur theatre, acting on stage in a number of plays. He was also a TV commentator for the Nine Network at the 1990 Auckland Commonwealth Games. He was also involved in Sports Administration and was active in encouraging young athletes. In 2000 he was awarded the Australia Sports Medal for his contribution to sport. He helped with Olympic team fund raising and Olympic education in schools and was currently working for the Department of Sport and Recreation and was a member of the Salvation Army.

Peter was vocal in his views on Australian athletics, however those who witnessed his presentation to John Steffensen at the Melbourne Cricket Crowd this year, where Peter presented John with a signed photo of the famous victory ceremony after he had heard that John viewed Peter as a hero know that he touched and influenced many athletes over the past 40 years.

Peter had a great sense of humour, was great company and was a generous man who will be sadly missed by all who knew him.

Peter passed away at his home in Williamstown a month after bypass surgery. He is survived by his second wife Jan and their daughters Belinda and Emma, and his first wife Ruth and children Gary, Sandra and Janita.

Paul Jenes
Athletics Australia Statistician
President ATFS (Association of Track and Field Statisticians)
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kerry on October 20, 2008, 12:25:40 am
(http://s119.photobucket.com/albums/o126/kez4oz/Album%201/funeral_wideweb__470x2930.jpg)
Honour for a friend ... Olympic athletes Tommie Smith, left,
and John Carlos carrying the coffin of Peter Norman (inset) from Williamstown
Town Hall yesterday, 9 Oct 2006.
Photo: Angela Wylie

Click here to read the original Sydney Morning Herald newspaper article of 10 Oct 2006:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/sport/olympic-protest-heroes-praise-normans-courage/2006/10/09/1160246069969.html
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Katie77 on October 20, 2008, 12:35:54 am
Thank you Kerry for all of this information.

The more I read, the more I think what a terrific bloke he was.

One of our unsung heros if you ask me....
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Ellemeno on October 20, 2008, 12:44:04 am
Kelda, thanks for posting this.  I hadn't heard about this film, or Peter Norman.

I remember pictures of that Black Power salute at the Olympics.  I was 9 years old, and I remember having a mix of feelings.  So much hopeful was going on then, but it often came in scary packages, marching, chanting, yelling, big fists in the air.  I remember the silence but huge power of that photo.  I didn't have a mental drawer to stick that image in, but recognized an opportunity used well, by individual humans in the right place, with courage, at the right time.  I don't even remember there being a third man there.  I'm glad he was supportive.

And I hadn't known that the mainstream came around to seeing that as a positive moment, even putting up a memorial to it.  Wow.


Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kerry on October 20, 2008, 12:49:38 am
Thank you Kerry for all of this information.

The more I read, the more I think what a terrific bloke he was.

One of our unsung heros if you ask me....

"A terrific bloke." Well said, Sue. I agree.  :'(
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Front-Ranger on October 20, 2008, 01:24:21 am
Thank you Kerry for all of this information.

The more I read, the more I think what a terrific bloke he was.

One of our unsung heros if you ask me....

Yes I agree. Australia produces some amazing unsung (and sung) heroes. Like our Heath...
Title: Re: The other man on the podium (1968 Mexico Olympics)
Post by: Kelda on October 21, 2008, 02:35:56 pm
I guess its not surprising that given this film was made by his nephew it may get too.. whats the word... unobjective? too close? .. you know what I mean.

However I'll stil be interested to watch and learn more about this champion of a guy.

Thankyou for all the fuether info Kerry.

And thank you for your replies Rob & Elle & Lee.