Author Topic: lovable subtle details  (Read 246067 times)

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #330 on: January 29, 2007, 02:51:03 pm »
Try this one on for size.  I noticed this quite out of the blue.  When Jack is laying on the ground playing the harmonica...I could swear he's playing "He Was a Friend of Mine".  Granted his playing is bad, but the melodic attempts follow the line of that song.  Now I'm not sure when Dylan released that song.

According to this site, http://www.bobdylan.com/songs/, it wasn't released until 1991 in The Bootleg Series.

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Scott6373

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #331 on: January 29, 2007, 02:52:44 pm »
According to this site, http://www.bobdylan.com/songs/, it wasn't released until 1991 in The Bootleg Series.



OK that's a heck of a lot of chronological license.

Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #332 on: January 29, 2007, 03:09:23 pm »
Has this one been discussed: Alma goes thru the mail and discovers the postcard from Jack, she puts it back in the mail and lays it face down and you see a advertisement featuring something to do with Carl Buddig and one for "Honey" and then you hear Jack's voice: "Honey, you seen my blue parka?".
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moremojo

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #333 on: January 29, 2007, 05:47:12 pm »
OK that's a heck of a lot of chronological license.
The anachronism might seem less glaring if we credit the report that Dylan didn't actually write the song, but rather transcribed it and recorded it. I believe the lyrics (and tune?) are anonymous, and might date as far back as the 1930s; FRiend Lee, do you know any more particulars about this?

Offline nakymaton

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #334 on: January 29, 2007, 06:02:55 pm »
There's more info on The Bootleg Series here: http://www.bobdylan.com/linernotes/bootleg.html . "He Was a Friend of Mine" is listed as being recorded in 1961 and copyrighted in 1962, and is listed as "traditional song adapted and arranged by Bob Dylan." So... ok, it existed in the early 60's. I doubt that Jack Twist would have had Bob Dylan bootleg recordings hiding under the seat of his old truck, but maybe he could have heard the "traditional" song? I dunno.
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Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #335 on: January 29, 2007, 06:30:16 pm »
The anachronism might seem less glaring if we credit the report that Dylan didn't actually write the song, but rather transcribed it and recorded it. I believe the lyrics (and tune?) are anonymous, and might date as far back as the 1930s; FRiend Lee, do you know any more particulars about this?

I don't recall the actual artist and date, but there are several versions dating all the way back to the 1930s.
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Offline nakymaton

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #336 on: January 29, 2007, 06:50:24 pm »
I dug around on the net and found out that the Grateful Dead used to play a version of it in the 70's. *dons tie-dye and does her best too-young pseudo-hippy-chick twirl* *is clearly a poseur because she doesn't have a single Dead tape that includes the song*

I found this discussion linked from a Deadhead discussion. http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97248
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Offline saucycobblers

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #337 on: January 30, 2007, 08:58:30 am »
I've always seen it as a little bit of all of these, particularly the first and third. Heath's acting is so good he can convey two completely different reactions in one facial expression. He seems amazed that someone is interested in having this kind of friendly conversation with him.


I always feel very moved by that look, and by the thought that this is the first time he's experienced this.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #338 on: January 30, 2007, 11:36:16 am »
I always feel very moved by that look, and by the thought that this is the first time he's experienced this.

Me too. When people are assessing Heath's performance, they should think not just about the big dramatic scenes but also about tiny moments like this. Somehow, very subtly, he conveys what this conversation means to Ennis without ever doing anything overt or obvious to telegraph it. For instance, some actors (and some directors) would show that this is a novel experience for Ennis by have Ennis gaze at Jack with amazement and admiration. Here, we most understand how Ennis is feeling when he's NOT looking at Jack, like at this moment or when he fumbles for a cigarette.

BTW, I remember once we were discussing what facial expressions from BBM we found ourselves adapting, and someone mentioned this one. I was pretty impressed; it's a hard one to duplicate.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: lovable subtle details
« Reply #339 on: January 30, 2007, 12:54:22 pm »
BTW, I remember once we were discussing what facial expressions from BBM we found ourselves adapting, and someone mentioned this one. I was pretty impressed; it's a hard one to duplicate.

I love this idea!! Where is that topic!! What immediately comes to mind is Jack's expression as Ennis is telling his life story and Ennis's subsequent face as he says "What?"

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