Author Topic: Broken in Two  (Read 56730 times)

Offline BlissC

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #70 on: April 16, 2008, 07:52:55 pm »
Ah! That's a very good point. I'll remember that next time I'm scheduling a secret trip.  ;)


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Offline Artiste

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #71 on: April 17, 2008, 09:22:13 pm »
Grands Tetons are like broken in two  ??

Like Ennis and Jack !! ??

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #72 on: April 18, 2008, 10:02:19 am »
The most famous peaks of the Grand Teton Range are the three mountains: Grand Teton at 13,770 ft, Mt. Owen at 12,928 ft and Teewinot, at 12,325 ft. So, we don't see a double peak like the one in the movie that represents Brokeback Mountain. But what is significant is that the Tetons are on the Continental Divide that divides North America into its western and eastern halves. The waters flowing down these mountains eventually go to the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans.

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Offline brokeplex

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #73 on: April 18, 2008, 08:05:24 pm »
The most famous peaks of the Grand Teton Range are the three mountains: Grand Teton at 13,770 ft, Mt. Owen at 12,928 ft and Teewinot, at 12,325 ft. So, we don't see a double peak like the one in the movie that represents Brokeback Mountain. But what is significant is that the Tetons are on the Continental Divide that divides North America into its western and eastern halves. The waters flowing down these mountains eventually go to the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans.



The Continental Divide, after running thru Yellowstone, turns sharply east and misses the Tetons. The divide then turns more southeast and finally south as it runs thru the Absorokas. Just west of Dubois, WY is about as close as it gets to the Teton range. So it is the waters falling on the Absorokas which are divided between the Pacific and Atlantic basins. The Tetons lie within the Pacific basin.   

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #74 on: April 25, 2008, 05:57:35 pm »
You are right, brokeplex, but in a way, I am too. The waters on the east side of the Tetons don't actually go to the Pacific Ocean, but they don't make a beeline for the Atlantic Ocean either. There is actually a high plateau in that part of Wyoming where there is no drainage either way. This can make for some interesting travelling this time of year. I just came back from Wyoming a few days ago and, in the "Muddy Gap" area southeast of the Wind River there are pools of mud and water standing around, something you don't see too often in the dry land known as Wyoming! This is also the habitat of the black-footed ferret. I saw quite a few ring-necked pheasants, which were colorful, and a big proud wild turkey out strolling with his harem!

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Offline brokeplex

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #75 on: April 25, 2008, 08:01:25 pm »
I glad that you enjoy that part of WY too. I took the long drive between Riverton and Dubois last year coming back from MT and I really loved the area east and west of the continental divide just west of Dubois. I also drove over to Jackson to visit some friends and loved the crashing rivers running down out of the Tetons. That area in particular reminds me of the part of Alberta Ang Lee filmed Brokeback in.

I looked on my physiographic map and I found the basin you are referring to, I did not get a chance to visit there last trip. I look forward to seeing the area. It seems sort of a no mans land, neither in the Atlantic basin or the Pacific basin, and it looks very dry. A water sump?

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #76 on: April 26, 2008, 11:45:02 pm »
The word Wyoming is from the Delaware Indians and it means mountains and valleys alternating. In Wyoming, there are always mountains ahead of you rising from the valley floor. Sometimes they are like visions of mountains, almost hanging in the sky, not even attached to the land. And the valleys have their own wild beauty matching the mountains. They seem to dance together across the state, and you better not be complacent, because one minute you'll be baking in the desert, while the next you are squeezing through a canyon with snow flying in your face!!
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Offline Artiste

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #77 on: April 27, 2008, 09:12:37 am »
Thanks, merci, Front-Ranger and oilfieldtrash !!

My penpal friend used to live in Brokeback Mountain at the Grand Tetons; he is missed by me; he was  murdered likely because he was a gay man; unfortunately!

Fortunately, he loved the Grand Tetons, serving as a guide to hunters there.

I remember the photos he sent to me, of moose coming in to eat with his horses.  I find it strange that there are moose there, do you?

And, would maybe Dubois be named by a relative of Annie?

Au revoir,
hugs!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #78 on: April 27, 2008, 01:37:06 pm »
Artiste, I saw two moose there while I was travelling in Grand Teton National Park in January. Moose are strange-looking creatures! I also saw one in Alberta when I was there in July and posted a picture of it on the Alberta Pilgrimage thread.

DuBoise could possibly have been named by a relative of Annie because she has French-Canadian blood and Wyoming was explored and named by French trappers and explorers.
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Offline brokeplex

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Re: Broken in Two
« Reply #79 on: April 27, 2008, 02:05:58 pm »
Artiste, I saw two moose there while I was travelling in Grand Teton National Park in January. Moose are strange-looking creatures! I also saw one in Alberta when I was there in July and posted a picture of it on the Alberta Pilgrimage thread.

DuBoise could possibly have been named by a relative of Annie because she has French-Canadian blood and Wyoming was explored and named by French trappers and explorers.

true, Artiste I have some info from the Dubois chamber, and I'll send it to you. DL has rigged up some scanner thing for me, I'll see if I can scan the chamber's promos  and history of that area into my computer. If I can, I'll forward it. there also is a web site which you can call up by going to google and putting in the word "dubois"

Some of the people that I spoke with when I was last in Dubois, had last names that "appeared" to have a French origin. Then maybe they had Basque ancestry and I confused them, but the population of the area not all Anglo by far.