Author Topic: What irks me about the holidays  (Read 49806 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #100 on: December 20, 2010, 01:13:00 am »
OK, one more doesn't-actually-irk-me-about-the-holidays comment: Andy Samberg is such a cutie; so preferable to Justin Beiber in the Internet Sensations Who Break Through to Become Successful in Other Media category, in my book. Sometimes to be honest I find his videos a bit tiresome, but that huge goofy grin goes along way toward making them tolerable or even entertaining.

This one is my all-time favorite, featuring not only Andy Samberg but also Seth Rogen and his eyebrows. Bill Hader has a funny cameo, too. I'm such a bad mom that, yes, I have watched this with my teenage sons.

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NisCkxU544c[/youtube]



Now back to discussing irksome holiday events!





Offline serious crayons

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #101 on: December 20, 2010, 01:59:40 am »
OK, here's one. What irks me about the holidays is that they have become so fraught with ... everything, that people actually come to dislike a season that's supposed to be fun. Today alone, I heard that my 18-year-old niece "hates" Christmas, and a 34-year-old friend doesn't really like it much. Each has his/her own valid reasons, and I don't blame those people. I don't even blame the holidays themselves. But it is disturbing that an event that on the surface should only give pleasure instead inspires dread.


Offline Monika

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #102 on: December 20, 2010, 03:01:42 am »
OK, here's one. What irks me about the holidays is that they have become so fraught with ... everything, that people actually come to dislike a season that's supposed to be fun. Today alone, I heard that my 18-year-old niece "hates" Christmas, and a 34-year-old friend doesn't really like it much. Each has his/her own valid reasons, and I don't blame those people. I don't even blame the holidays themselves. But it is disturbing that an event that on the surface should only give pleasure instead inspires dread.


I think it´s the hype. Then if you wind up not having fun, it makes you feel as though you have failed.

Offline Lynne

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #103 on: December 20, 2010, 08:44:20 am »
It is the hype, I agree. The key, I think, is to set your own expectations and be firm when family (or whoever) starts the pressure for more of you.

For a personal example, Mom has decided she wants to 'shop' for Chris, Ronny, my brother, and me.

Well, I should have expected it. And I'm glad actually - because - her showing interest in life is always good!  But now we are celebrating the 28th or 29th, depending on Ronny's schedule.  And I am going to sit down with her at the laptop and help her choose the gifts.  I guess Chris can do the same for mine. I'm not going back to the days of actually doing everyone's shopping.

And it's no problem to be flexible about the date, to my way of thinking.
"Laß sein. Laß sein."

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #104 on: December 20, 2010, 10:19:36 am »
"Dominic the Italian Donkey song and video Dominick the Donkey is a well known Christmas song written by Ray [Richard] Allen and Lou Monte and first sung by Lou Monte in 1960. For decades the song was only occasionally heard.

Never heard it or even heard of it--until yesterday. It played on the PA system in the bar/restaurant where I was having brunch with friends after church. I guess, maybe, I'm kinda glad that there was too much ambient background noise for me to actually hear it.

The funniest thing about the experience is that one of the servers on duty yesterday is named--you guessed it!--Dominic! He was convinced the manager was playing the song on purpose just to annoy him!  :laugh:

(BTW, he's quite a cutie wth a dimple to die for. ...  ::) )
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline milomorris

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #105 on: December 20, 2010, 12:26:09 pm »
There are many different religions and non religious celebrations of this time of year.  Christmas is only one of those.  The Jewish religion has
their festival of lights this time of year.  The naturists or Druids celebrate the Winter
Soltice, this time of year, and there are the many other different kinds of celebrations that all seem to culminate at this time of year.  Then there are the athiests that don't have a certain holiday to commemorate, but then does that mean that they are not allowed to have a festival and as they referred to on the Seinfeld show "The Festivas for the rest of us?"

Maybe you didn't read the other posts I made in this thread. I have no problem with Jews celebrating Hanukkah, Druids celebrating winter, or anyone celebrating whatever other holiday happens to occur during this time of year. My "irk" is with secular celebrations of Christmas. If you're calling what you celebrate "Christmas," and don't acknowledge Christ, you're not celebrating Christmas at all.
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Offline milomorris

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #106 on: December 20, 2010, 12:33:28 pm »
You're fighting a losing battle Milo trying to return Christmas to Christ.  It's a battle the Puritans lost and the early Christian leaders knew better than to fight.  The celebration of the Solstice is always going to be party time and it's been that way since before Jesus and will outlast his celebration as well.

They can party all they want. But if they're going to call it Christmas, they can at least give Jesus his props.
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #107 on: December 20, 2010, 02:09:19 pm »





C harles Dickens has probably had more influence on the way that we celebrate Christmas today than any single individual in human history except one.

At the beginning of the Victorian period the celebration of Christmas was in decline. The medieval Christmas traditions, which combined the celebration  of the birth of Christ with the ancient Roman festival of Christ with the ancient Roman festival of Saturnalia (a pagan celebration for the Roman god of agriculture), and the Germanic winter festival of Yule, had come under intense scrutiny by the Puritans under Oliver Cromwell. The Industrial Revolution, in full swing in Dickens' time, allowed workers little time for the celebration of Christmas.

The romantic revival of Christmas traditions that occurred in Victorian times had other contributors: Prince Albert brought the German custom of decorating the Christmas tree to England, the singing of Christmas carols (which had all but disappeared at the turn of the century) began to thrive again, and the first Christmas card appeared in the 1840s. But it was the Christmas stories of Dickens, particularly his 1843 masterpiece A Christmas Carol,  that rekindled the joy of Christmas in Britain and America. Today, after more than 160 years, A Christmas Carol  continues to be relevant, sending a message that cuts through the materialistic trappings of the season and gets to the heart and soul of the holidays.

Dickens' describes the holidays as "a good time: a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time: the only time I know of in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of other people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys". This was what Dickens described for the rest of his life as the "Carol Philosophy".

Dickens' name had become so synonymous with Christmas that on hearing of his death in 1870 a little costermonger's girl in London asked, "Mr. Dickens dead? Then will Father Christmas die too?"




Dickens' cherished little Christmas story, the best loved and most read of all of his books, began life as the result of the author's desperate need of money. In the fall of 1843 Dickens and his wife Kate were expecting their fifth child. Requests for money from his family, a large mortgage on his Devonshire Terrace home, and lagging sales from the monthly installments of Martin Chuzzlewit,  had left Dickens seriously short of cash.

The seeds for the story that became A Christmas Carol  were planted in Dickens' mind during a trip to Manchester to deliver a speech in support the Athenaeum, which provided adult education for the manufacturing workers there. Thoughts of education as a remedy for crime and poverty, along with scenes he had recently witnessed at the Field Lane Ragged School, caused Dickens to resolve to "strike a sledge hammer blow" for the poor.

As the idea for the story took shape and the writing began in earnest, Dickens became engrossed in the book. He wrote that as the tale unfolded he 'wept and laughed, and wept again' and that he 'walked about the black streets of London fifteen or twenty miles many a night when all sober folks had gone to bed'.

At odds with his publishers, Dickens paid for the production cost of the book himself and insisted on a lavish design that included a gold-stamped cover and four hand-colored etchings. He also set the price at 5 shillings so that the book would be affordable to nearly everyone.




The book was published during the week before Christmas 1843 and was an instant sensation but, due to the high production costs, Dickens' earning from the sales were lower than expected. In addition to the disappointing profit from the book Dickens was enraged that the work was instantly the victim of pirated editions. Copyright laws in England were often loosely enforced and a complete lack of international copyright law had been Dickens' theme during his trip to America the year before. He ended up spending more money fighting pirated editions of the book than he was making from the book itself.

Despite these early financial difficulties, Dickens' Christmas tale of human redemption has endured beyond even Dickens' own vivid imagination. It was a favorite during Dickens' public readings of his works late in his lifetime and is known today primarily due to the dozens of film versions and dramatizations which continue to be produced every year.




Preface to the Original Edition

I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it.

Their faithful Friend and Servant,
C. D.
December, 1843.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #108 on: December 20, 2010, 02:29:12 pm »



http://www.fidnet.com/~dap1955/dickens/carol.html


Original Illustrations

John Leech provided eight illustrations for A Christmas Carol.
Four woodcuts and four hand colored etchings:





     


   


   


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Luvlylittlewing

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Re: What irks me about the holidays
« Reply #109 on: December 20, 2010, 02:46:34 pm »
Oh I just love a Christmas Carol.  It is one of my favorite works of literature.  It also scares me to death -- all season I'm on edge because I watch every Christmas Carol show/movie/production shown on TV and I've collected just about all of them on DVD.  I'm even working on a screenplay of A Christmas Carol with a twist.  Who knows, perhaps soon you'll see a production of my version of this classic.