Author Topic: The Laundry Room  (Read 61234 times)

Offline Front-Ranger

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The Laundry Room
« on: July 01, 2006, 11:13:05 am »
I love the theme of the laundry because it brings together two motifs to intertwine in the story and the movie of Brokeback Mountain--the garments that stand in for absent characters, and the water that carries both the story and the lives told about in the story in its flow.

In the story, the first reference to the laundry is during the embarkation of the sheep, Ennis and Jack, and all the trappings to go up the mountain, "flowed up the trail like dirty water." This was also nicely pictured in the movie. Next, in the movie, when Ennis is away from camp, Jack is cleaning Ennis's shirt in the stream, beating on it with a stick. But in a larger metaphorical way, being on the mountain and subjected to its natural forces puts Ennis and Jack "through the wringer" so to speak. For instance, a hailstorm sends Ennis and Jack to the shelter of the tent, and the sheep get mixed up with another herd, their paint brands worn and faint, and Ennis has a hard time sorting it out. Yes, that's happened to me on wash day too!!

Another example is when a storm is coming and Ennis and Jack have to bring the sheep down off the mountain. The mountain "boils with demonic energy," "the wind combed the grass," and Ennis felt he was "in a slow-motion, but headlong, irreversible fall." He is disoriented by the events and by the mountain itself. At the end of the trail, the foreman Joe Aguirre notices that everything is mixed up. "Ranch stiffs never did much of a job," he remarks.

Down from the mountain, the boys separate, but their clothing signals how much they identify with each other and pine for each other. Ennis's wife Alma is like a modern-day Ophelia, always scrubbing her husband's old shirts on a washboard but never able to wash away the memory of Brokeback that made him distant and distracted. Hint to Alma, line drying shirts in the bitter euphoric air with the hot sun striking down is apt to bring back memories of another time and place.

Ennis and Alma move to an apartment above a laundromat, and this is where the reunion occurs. The laundry is the place of transformation, a cauldron that acts as a crucible for long-buried passions to come to the surface. When Ennis is introducing Jack to Alma, he is overwhelmed by the smell of Jack, "the intensely familiar odor of cigarettes, musky sweat, and a faint sweetness like grass, and with it the rushing cold of the mountain." Away from the laundry, now, the smells continue at the Motel Siesta, until they refresh by skinny dipping in the stream the next day.

A change that occurs with the laundromat is the electrification of Ennis's thoughts, just as the washing machines that appear in the story are now electric. These references are plentiful during the reunion scene--"his shaking hand grazed Ennis's hand, electrical current snapped between them," "a hot jolt scalded Ennis."

This is the place where Ennis so tenderly says to Jack, "I sure wrang it out a hunderd times thinkin about you." In case we weren't sure whether the laundry theme was significant, we now know.

As the years go by, Ennis stays "as lean as a clothespole" and his never-changing wardrobe is noted, while Jack's transformation into a Texas dude is also pointed out. Their trips to the high country are a series of discussions of waterways and drainages. When Jack scoops up some icy stream water to drink, Ennis cautions that he might get a fever. At their last meeting, the years of things unsaid and now unsayable rise like vast clouds of steam. Suddenly a clothes hanger appears as a metaphor, being used to unlock a car door and then straightened back for its original use. This clothes hanger will appear again, and once again will unlock the truth.

As Ennis is climbing the stairs to Jack's room, he remembers the gruesome story that Jack told of his dad pissing on him when he was a child of about three or four, and how he was forced to mop up the mess, take off all his clothes, and wash them in the bathtub. It was also Jack's first revelation that he was different from his dad and other men. But when Jack washed Ennis's shirt in the stream when Ennis was away, it moved him so deeply that he took Ennis's shirt away and created a shrine out of the two shirts in his closet. In the story, Ennis discovers Jack's shirt, hung on a nail, then Ennis's blood on the shirt, and finally, Ennis's "plaid shirt, lost, he'd thought, long ago in some damn laundry..."

In the movie, the clothes hanger on which both the shirts are hung presses into Ennis's face like a question mark, as he embraces them and breathes deeply, hoping for a scent of Jack.

At the end of the story, Ennis is washing horseblankets, then goes to a gift shop to buy a post card of Brokeback Mountain. At the end of the movie, he is left with Alma, Jr.'s sweater, which he folds carefully and stows in the closet with the two shirts. The clothing dutifully stands in for absent people, silently speaking out for them, even to the point where Ennis is speaking to the shirt, saying "Jack, I swear." The tears, and the water, and wringing have had a powerful effect on Ennis and have worn him down to his essence, like the powerful effect that water has on an impassive mountain.





« Last Edit: January 07, 2009, 05:17:23 pm by Front-Ranger »
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Offline stevenedel

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2006, 11:44:10 am »
Thanks, Front-Ranger, for a very perceptive and thought-provoking post!
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Offline jpwagoneer1964

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2006, 11:50:40 am »
Good post
 One factual error in the book and movie is the mixing of the sheep. If a herd is mixed they simpley need to be led away by their respective herdsman. The sheep know there herdsman and will remain intact.
Thank you Heath and Jake for showing us Ennis and Jack,  teaching us how much they loved one another.

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2006, 04:23:57 pm »
The tears, and the water, and wringing have had a powerful effect on Ennis and have worn him down to his essence, like the powerful effect that water has on an impassive mountain.

Wonderful said, Lee. Your whole posting is thoughtful and full of good examples regarding clothes/laundry/water. But I especially love the above quoted sentence.

Quote
I love the theme of the laundry because it brings together two motifs to intertwine in the story and the movie of Brokeback Mountain--the garments that stand in for absent characters, and the water that carries both the story and the lives told about in the story in its flow.

I knew/felt it/have read somewhere that the theme of laundry is important to the movie. But this equation never occurred to me until you pointed it out:
clothes + water = laundry

Even at my first viewing it attracted my attention that Ennis and Alma live above a laundromat. At first I didn't know why this is so obviously shown, only recognized it. Then I read on TOB that it is to demonstrate their poverty: Alma doing the laundry with her hands, though they live above a laundromat. And this is sure a valid point. But there is more to the whole laundry theme. And you pointed it out very well.

Doing laundny for another person is also an intimate thing to do and a part of being domestic together. It is Jack who does it for Ennis, before Alma does. As it is Jack who first lived together with Ennis, came close to him, made him open up himself (not only first, but more than Alma was able to in 12 years of marriage), and finally Jack was first to have sex with Ennis before Alma had (o.k. the last one is debatable because we have no evidence for it).

Ennis is never shown doing laundry, although he must have done it before their job switch on Brokeback and later in the movie when he lived alone. Why?

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2006, 04:33:45 pm »
I like that thought, pent, about laundry being an intimate thing to do for another person. Actually, I think that at the end when Ennis carefully folds Jr's sweater and puts it away, and then snaps Jack's shirt, that that is the first time we see him "doing the laundry" for the absent beloveds.
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Offline Midnight24

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2006, 05:02:10 pm »
I like that thought, pent, about laundry being an intimate thing to do for another person. Actually, I think that at the end when Ennis carefully folds Jr's sweater and puts it away, and then snaps Jack's shirt, that that is the first time we see him "doing the laundry" for the absent beloveds.

I'd like to think of it that way, too. It shows intimancy between Ennis and Jack even though Jack isn't there any more. It's hard for me to explain it, but it's hard for me to put it into words.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2006, 02:02:22 am »
Great post, Lee! I watched the movie with a friend last night -- she's seen it a few times, mostly at my insistence, but is not a huge fan by our standards -- and then this morning she was musing on the meaning of the laundry. I think there's really a lot going on with it.

The big difference I've always noticed is that Jack does the laundry outdoors, in nature, whereas Alma does the laundry the way she does the dishes -- inside, with civilized "society" water. But earlier on, we see her as a hopeful young bride, hanging laundry outside in the yard, relatively in nature but also somewhat domestic. Is that because she is hoping at that point that their relationship will be "a force of nature"?

And then there's the joke, one of my favorites on the Cowboy Etiquette thread. Ennis parks in the back parking lot, right under the "Laundromat entrance around front" sign. Yet Ennis' own favorite entrance is not in the front! It's funny, but is it JUST funny? Subconsciously, I guess, he's not interested in the front-entrance laundromat life.

Doing laundny for another person is also an intimate thing to do and a part of being domestic together. It is Jack who does it for Ennis, before Alma does. ... Ennis is never shown doing laundry, although he must have done it before their job switch on Brokeback and later in the movie when he lived alone. Why?

Hi Penth! Nice to see you! Ennis undoubtedly does do laundry, but I think it's probably just not important enough to show. Instead, we see Jack and Alma washing Ennis' shirts because they're competing, implicitly, as Ennis' partner. (We do see Ennis doing other nice things for Jack, but if we saw him do Jack's laundry it might confuse the issue.)

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2006, 03:08:10 am »
Instead, we see Jack and Alma washing Ennis' shirts because they're competing, implicitly, as Ennis' partner. (We do see Ennis doing other nice things for Jack, but if we saw him do Jack's laundry it might confuse the issue.)

Yeah, the competition between Jack and Alma, you're right. I itemisized some of it, bit I didn't see the wood for the trees. And it might have diluted the effect if we had seen Ennis doing the laundry.

I've said it before (and many others have too), but I have to repeat it:
Is there anything in this movie that is not reasoned, well thought out and deliberate? I guess there is, there are even flaws in the movie. But I've never seen a movie where so many seemingly circumstancial, random details are not random, but deliberate and meaningful.


I like that thought, pent, about laundry being an intimate thing to do for another person. Actually, I think that at the end when Ennis carefully folds Jr's sweater and puts it away, and then snaps Jack's shirt, that that is the first time we see him "doing the laundry" for the absent beloveds.
A lovely way to think about it. I love the way Ennis folds the sweater, so careful, gentle and tender (same for the shirts). Reminds me of Amanda's thought, posted on another thread, that Ennis tends to linger his fingers on things and how he caresses the first postcard.  Ohhh, he is such a sweet guy. I just love everything Ennis.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2006, 03:19:41 am »
Ohhh, he is such a sweet guy. I just love everything Ennis.

I'm with you there! (As you well know.  ::)) I could go on and on with examples, myself. Oh wait -- I think maybe I've done that already.

Penth, your mention of flaws compared to the extreme care given to so many minute details is interesting. I hope it's not too OT, but that baffles me. And I don't just mean details like the microphone cord on little Alma Jr. or the magical peanuts and chopping-block log -- flaws that, as somebody pointed out, may have been prohibitively expensive to fix by the time they were discovered. But there are even flaws that seemingly resulted from poor planning -- date glitches, particularly -- which is strange, given how beautifully so many other things are planned.

Offline Sheriff Roland

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2006, 03:50:09 pm »
Here's a little quote from the book:

"...You want some a this hot water? There's plenty."
"It's all yours."
"Well, I'm goin a warsh everthing I can reach," he said, pulling off his boots and jeans (no drawers, no socks, Jack noticed), slopping the green washcloth around until the fire spat.


Seems to me that Ennis isn't just talking about body parts when he says he's "goin a warsh everything (he) can reach". So he did take care of laundry too.

Otherwise, I LOVE this thread. I love that 6 months after seeing the movie, I'm still being shown connections that warm my heart. And like a couple a people have claimed in recent posts, I too LOVE everything Ennis! It says so right there under my avatar! And that too was the name of the first thread of importance that I posted at IMDb (which can be found in the archives here at BetterMost), and the initial reason for the eventual creation of "I Love the Lighter Side" forum, also here at BetterMost.
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Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2006, 05:51:39 pm »
Some of you seem to be a little cornfused! This is the laundry room. The I love everything Ennis room is down the block. In fact there's a whole streetful of I love everything Ennis rooms for your pleasure! (I'm a Jack person myself. Have too many Ennises littering my past; in fact I am an Ennis myself!)
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Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2006, 04:00:41 am »
Some of you seem to be a little cornfused! This is the laundry room. The I love everything Ennis room is down the block.

 :laugh: Thinking of Ennis confuses me every time  ::) But you're right, let me do some more laundry:

When we see Alma taking off laundry from the clothesline outside the little house/ranch (before they move to Riverton), we see noticably Ennis's brown patterned shirt, and we see Alma taking it off. It's the same shirt that he wears in TS1 (and when they come down the mountain). This is another detail, which I noticed, but don't know what to think about it. It's like the one cherry in the cherry cake: demonstrative.
I'll attach pics of the three scenes below.


I'm with you there! (As you well know.  ::)) I could go on and on with examples, myself. Oh wait -- I think maybe I've done that already.
:laugh: :) :laugh: :) :laugh: ;D :laugh: :)


Quote
Penth, your mention of flaws compared to the extreme care given to so many minute details is interesting. I hope it's not too OT, but that baffles me. And I don't just mean details like the microphone cord on little Alma Jr. or the magical peanuts and chopping-block log -- flaws that, as somebody pointed out, may have been prohibitively expensive to fix by the time they were discovered. But there are even flaws that seemingly resulted from poor planning -- date glitches, particularly -- which is strange, given how beautifully so many other things are planned.

Strange is the word I would use, too. It puzzles me. Since it is OT here, maybe you could open a new thread for it?



The pics:
In the first pic, you can the at the sleeve, that it's the brown patterned shirt:


Coming down the mountain:


Alma at the clothesline (click to enlarge):
« Last Edit: July 05, 2006, 04:03:26 am by Penthesilea »

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2006, 04:23:46 pm »
Thanks for the pictures! Say, I was watching the movie last night (wanted to see the 4th of July scene again!) and I noticed that I have a shirt that is exactly like the one Jack wears in the post-divorce scene! It has diamond snaps and is in a dark blue-gray color with a chalk stripe. I got it at Rockmount Western Wear which is where the two starring shirts are from, in Denver, of course. (Notice how I so cleverly worked Jack into this post?!)
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #13 on: July 05, 2006, 06:09:58 pm »
F-R, you're the third or fourth person here I've seen say they watched the movie yesterday in honor of the 4th. Must be an unofficial Brokie holiday!

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2006, 06:22:37 pm »
The Fourth of July, Thanksgiving, the first full moon in June, and the Oscars have all changed in my mind, Katharine. New rituals for a new way of thinking!
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Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2006, 09:39:17 pm »
I have very little to add here at the moment... but I thought I'd pop in and say this is a lovely thread Lee!  I love the idea that we're seeing Ennis doing "laundry" (of a sort) at the very end when he folds Alma Jr's sweater and buttons Jack's shirt.
 :'(

Well, this may seem obvious and it also may have been mentioned here and there before... but I think it's a sign of "partnership".  Yes, doing laundry is certainly an intimate act (I think it's no accident that we see Jack washing Ennis's shirt... naked... after TS1... they're about as intimate as possible at this point) and it's the kind of thing you'd only likely to do for your partner or family.  I think this is meant to demonstrate that Jack was already very comfortably (and naturally) in the role of Ennis's partner up on Brokeback before Ennis settled down with Alma.  It seems important for the story/ film that Jack was Ennis's first love/ domestic partner despite the fact that he was technically engaged to Alma already.  I think this is why we hear the "opportunity" conversation... to be sure the audience knows that Jack is Ennis's first.  It makes Jack's "claim" on Ennis for the rest of the film seem appropriate... and unfortunately and unbeknownst to Alma it makes her seem like the usurper.  And this role of "partner" or the place where they could be "partners" is the place where they can never really return...  But, they both know that they were both happiest when they were living together as partners (Ennis admits he realizes this during the argument about him moving to Texas... when he says in a flippant way..."we could just live together herding sheep... and whiskey would flow in the stream..."  he's showing that he does recognize this as an ideal... so much so that it's now a fantasy).
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Offline jpwagoneer1964

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2006, 10:01:01 pm »
I have very little to add here at the moment... but I thought I'd pop in and say this is a lovely thread Lee!  I love the idea that we're seeing Ennis doing "laundry" (of a sort) at the very end when he folds Alma Jr's sweater and buttons Jack's shirt.
 :'(

Well, this may seem obvious and it also may have been mentioned here and there before... but I think it's a sign of "partnership".  Yes, doing laundry is certainly an intimate act (I think it's no accident that we see Jack washing Ennis's shirt... naked... after TS1... they're about as intimate as possible at this point) and it's the kind of thing you'd only likely to do for your partner or family.  I think this is meant to demonstrate that Jack was already very comfortably (and naturally) in the role of Ennis's partner up on Brokeback before Ennis settled down with Alma.  It seems important for the story/ film that Jack was Ennis's first love/ domestic partner despite the fact that he was technically engaged to Alma already.  I think this is why we hear the "opportunity" conversation... to be sure the audience knows that Jack is Ennis's first.  It makes Jack's "claim" on Ennis for the rest of the film seem appropriate... and unfortunately and unbeknownst to Alma it makes her seem like the usurper.  And this role of "partner" or the place where they could be "partners" is the place where they can never really return...  But, they both know that they were both happiest when they were living together as partners (Ennis admits he realizes this during the argument about him moving to Texas... when he says in a flippant way..."we could just live together herding sheep... and whiskey would flow in the stream..."  he's showing that he does recognize this as an ideal... so much so that it's now a fantasy).
While I agree with you that laundry is an intimate act, I do think that it was Jack job as camp tender at that time to do laundry for the both of them just as it would have been Ennis's when he was tender. there just wouldn'y have been time for the herder to do it. The we a partnership at some level from the very begining.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2006, 10:38:40 pm by jpwagoneer1964 »
Thank you Heath and Jake for showing us Ennis and Jack,  teaching us how much they loved one another.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2006, 11:10:38 pm »
Thanks, Front-Ranger, for a very perceptive and thought-provoking post!
I second that thought, stevenedel, and I also want to commend you on your avatar. That's Uhr-Ennis there, the living prototype for the tragic and beautiful cowboy we have come to know and love on the big screen. I feel you honor and immortalize that real human being by projecting his image here--thank you for that.

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Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2006, 11:28:47 pm »
While I adree with you that laundry is an intimate act, I do think that it was Jack job as camp tender at that time to do laundry for the both of them just as it would have been Ennis's when he was tender. there just wouldn'y have been time for the herder to do it. The we a partnership at some level from the very begining.

Yes, I'm sure that Ennis would have done Jack's laundry too and that it was part of the "job" description... but I don't think that either of them thought about it as if it were a job... know what I mean? 
 ;)
Or, maybe it started out feeling like a job, but as time went by they began to feel like it was a little thrilling to have such 'intimate' access to each other's clothes... it especially would have seemed like much more than a job once they'd become lovers.  By the way... I love how Jack pounds away at Ennis's shirt (the shirt, by the way) in the stream as if he's letting all his frustration and anxiety loose on it.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2006, 01:13:46 am by atz75 »
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2006, 11:38:10 pm »
Yes, I agree it's very satisfying the way he pounds on the shirt, Amanda!
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2006, 12:45:53 am »
It seems important for the story/ film that Jack was Ennis's first love/ domestic partner despite the fact that he was technically engaged to Alma already.  I think this is why we hear the "opportunity" conversation... to be sure the audience knows that Jack is Ennis's first.  It makes Jack's "claim" on Ennis for the rest of the film seem appropriate... and unfortunately and unbeknownst to Alma it makes her seem like the usurper.

Very good point, Amanda. If we'd seen Ennis and Alma together before Brokeback, it would have cast a slightly different spin on which couple is more "right." Of course, eventually we would come to see that Jack and Ennis are right together, for all kinds of reasons. But whatever couple comes first establishes itself in the viewer's mind, giving the next couple -- even if it's the dramatically "right" one -- a little hurdle to jump. Often that hurdle jumping is accomplished by having the previous partner seem wildly inappropriate (a jerk, really boring, extremely mismatched or something like that). But that's not the objective with Alma; she's meant to seem a nice wife caught in an unfortunate marriage. So it's best to let Ennis and Jack as a couple capture our empathy before Alma enters the picture.

Anyway, what this all has to do with laundry is that Jack's laundry-doing sticks in our mind in a very memorable scene -- so to all the other reasons we've previously discussed as to why he might be doing laundry naked, add that it sure grabs attention and makes the scene stick in our minds! Then the first time we see Alma after she and Ennis have set up house, she's also doing laundry. But in a far more mundane, indoorsy, domesticated, fully clothed, "society" way.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2006, 01:49:16 am by latjoreme »

Offline jpwagoneer1964

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2006, 01:06:22 am »
Yes, I'm sure that Ennis would have done Jack's laundry too and that it was part of the "job" description... but I don't think that either of them thought about it as if it were a job... know what I mean? 
 ;)
Or, maybe it started out feeling like a job, but as time went by they began to feel like it was a little thrilling to have such 'intimate' access to each other's clothes... it especially would have seemed like much more than a job once they'd become lovers.  By the way... I love how Jack pounds away at Ennis's shirt in the stream (it's the shirt too, by the way) as if he's letting all his frustration and anxiety loose on it.
Yes I agree, very well put.
Thank you Heath and Jake for showing us Ennis and Jack,  teaching us how much they loved one another.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2006, 09:50:28 am »
Maybe when he is beating on the shirt he is thinking back, perhaps subconsciously, to that time when he as a small child was forced to take off all his clothes that had been soiled by his cruel father and wash them in the bathtub, and maybe that is why he is beating them with such force and shivering at the same time.
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Offline fernly

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2006, 10:18:52 am »
Maybe when he is beating on the shirt he is thinking back, perhaps subconsciously, to that time when he as a small child was forced to take off all his clothes that had been soiled by his cruel father and wash them in the bathtub, and maybe that is why he is beating them with such force and shivering at the same time.
Lee, that is such a great observation! I think this scene, like all the rest, is working on so many levels, from the very prosaic (anyone would probably be shivering) to simple character differences (Jack feels the cold more than Ennis) to all the implications discussed before of Jack washing clothes between TS1 and TS2.
And now your post illuminates the scene as another of those times when Ang, et al, use visuals instead of words to bring in elements of the story. That instance of abuse is so horrific, and would have been utterly impossible to put in overtly into the film, but is really important. It's always broken my heart that the last direct words from Jack in the story are about that - "No way to get it right with him after that." (and maybe those words resonate further too...)
Thank you finding this connection.
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Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #24 on: July 06, 2006, 12:36:12 pm »
Another thing that is relevant here is the passage at the end where Ennis dreams about Jack and when he wakes, sometimes the pillow is wet and sometimes it's the sheets. In the process of becoming wet, the fabric and the people go through a transformative process. It's a force of nature.
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2006, 09:29:41 pm »
Well, I'm rather envious of the friend that got to watch BBM with you, Katherine. Maybe someday... but I also wanted to mention that Ennis is doing laundry at the end of the story. He throws all the horseblankets from the Coffeepot ranch where he is working into the pickup and hoses them off at the car wash. Then he steps across the street to the gift shop to buy a post card of Brokeback Mountain.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2006, 01:31:58 am »
Well, I'm rather envious of the friend that got to watch BBM with you, Katherine.

That's nice of you to say, Lee, but don't be envious. She wasn't much fun, anyways, was she? That is, she's fun as a friend, but she's not much fun as a Brokie. She has seen the movie three or four times, she owns a review DVD and I've been pretty upfront with her (moreso than anyone else, anyway) about the depth of my obsession. So she's as close as I come to a "real life" Brokie friend (not including the Brokie friends I have since met in "real life" ;))  But she talks during the movie; she's not fully engaged; she's interested in, but not blown away by, all the nuances and metaphors; she doesn't find the tent scenes hot (?!); and she goes to bed halfway through (while I, of course, stay up til 2 a.m. watching to the end).

In other words, good sport though she is to humor my obsession, she falls far, far short of a real Brokie. So you're right, someday ...

OK, back to laundry. How about a negative example -- the laundry that conspicuously doesn't get washed, i.e., the blood-stained shirts. As you say, Lee:

Quote
In the story, Ennis discovers Jack's shirt, hung on a nail, then Ennis's blood on the shirt, and finally, Ennis's "plaid shirt, lost, he'd thought, long ago in some damn laundry..."

Is it significant that he thought the blood had been washed out, but in fact Jack had seen to it that it wasn't?

And, Lee, I love your inclusion of "I wrang it out" being another allusion to laundry. We see Jack naked in the river and although he's not wringing it out in the other sense, we see him as the person who does the (shirt) wringing for Ennis and not vise versa. But, in fact, the wringing goes both ways. In "wrang it out," I'd bet Annie's choice of idiom is not accidental.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2006, 12:28:22 pm »
That's what I love about her! Anybody else would think that Wyoming is an unlikely place to look for pithy and axiomatic idioms, but she proves us wrong. And speaking of word choice, I love your choice of idioms!
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #28 on: July 13, 2006, 09:12:28 pm »
Sometimes I like to just come back to this thread and rest, reading all the posts here, and just enjoying the coolness and darkness of the laundry room. It calms me down  when I feel like I've been "through the wringer" like I feel today.  :(
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Offline bbm_stitchbuffyfan

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #29 on: July 13, 2006, 11:09:54 pm »
*bump* This is a very interesting theme!
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2006, 11:00:54 pm »
The big difference I've always noticed is that Jack does the laundry outdoors, in nature, whereas Alma does the laundry the way she does the dishes -- inside, with civilized "society" water. But earlier on, we see her as a hopeful young bride, hanging laundry outside in the yard, relatively in nature but also somewhat domestic. Is that because she is hoping at that point that their relationship will be "a force of nature"?

Beautiful thread you're wringin' out here, everyone.  The above quote by Katherine makes me think of the line from the story:

"I looked in the case when I got a chance and there was my note still tied there and that line hadn't touched water in its life." As though the word "water" had called out its domestic cousin she twisted the faucet, sluiced the plates.

When I saw the line 'clothes + water = laundry,' I thought it was brilliant, and wanted a bumper sticker saying it.  Then I pictured that bumper sticker, and knew that no one would ever begin to get the wisdom it expresses.  Thanks for starting this beautiful thread, Lee.  Happy Birthday again.  :)

Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #31 on: July 19, 2006, 10:47:43 pm »
Isn't it amazing how this movie -and really all our analysis of the movie- make completely mundane things seem super-meaningful.  Who would have ever guessed that laundry, buckets, coffeepots and even shirts could be so exciting and interesting?

 :)
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #32 on: July 20, 2006, 06:22:12 pm »
Isn't it amazing how this movie -and really all our analysis of the movie- make completely mundane things seem super-meaningful.  Who would have ever guessed that laundry, buckets, coffeepots and even shirts could be so exciting and interesting?

 :)
Amazing, indeed. I know of very few works of cinematic fiction that posit so much meaning into everyday objects. The nearest other example that came to mind was that of the oeuvre of the great Japanese filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu, who lovingly detailed the daily domestic world of his middle-class characters, sometimes paying as close attention to the accoutrements of their environment as to the human beings wielding them. His famous 'pillow shots', wherein the camera lingers on a space after the human inhabitants have departed, are a salient example of this. But in Ozu, these objects always exist in and of themselves. They never serve as symbols for some underlying human or archetypal element, which is precisely how the objects in BBM function.

Jean-Luc Godard has written of Alfred Hitchcock being a filmmaker from whose films we primarily remember objects as opposed to people. Windmills, wine bottles, a glass of milk...we retain more vivid memories of these things than we do of the characters and stories comprising Foreign Correspondent, Notorious, and I Confess, respectively. As a conveyor of mysterious yet vital power through objects, Hitchcock attained not only supremacy as a rare poet of cinema, but even became "master of the universe". I submit that in Brokeback Mountain, Hitchcock's oeuvre has met its equal in the poetic and mythic uses of symbol-laden objects that Godard so evidently celebrates.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #33 on: August 17, 2006, 04:50:42 pm »
Thank you, Scott, for lending some class to this subject! I was rereading the story today, and noticed another laundry reference in the scene where Ennis discovers the shirts in Jack's closet. In addition to thinking his shirt had been lost "in some damn laundry" in the past, Ennis at first glance into the closet saw a couple of pairs of jeans that had been crease-pressed and folded neatly over a wire hanger. Not only would the iron have made an impression upon the jeans but also the hanger would have left a crease too. This is a haunting allusion to the tire iron that, in Ennis's mind, caused Jack's death. And the vertical and horizontal creases in the jeans would have made a cross. Finally, there were two pair of jeans, just like there were two shirts. In just a few words, the author has hinted at several different meanings. Pretty amazing.
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #34 on: August 20, 2006, 10:54:01 pm »
Yea, really amazing, he replied...
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Marge_Innavera

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #35 on: August 27, 2006, 03:26:28 pm »
Anyway, what this all has to do with laundry is that Jack's laundry-doing sticks in our mind in a very memorable scene -- so to all the other reasons we've previously discussed as to why he might be doing laundry naked, add that it sure grabs attention and makes the scene stick in our minds!

One of the things I love about the film is that the symbolism is always an integral part of the plot and script, rather than being just plunked down in the story. As even beginning writers know, symbolism is a bit like playing chess: very quick & easy to learn to do; very difficult and sometimes impossible to learn to do well.

In the case of Jack doing laundry naked, they've gone up there with only one change of clothes each. And if you're doing laundry in a stream under those circumstances, the best practice is to do it naked or at least in your underwear: that ensures having a dry set of clothes to put on later.

For me, that aspect of the symbolic parts also fitting into the literal story was one of the best aspects of the movie.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2006, 03:28:41 pm by Marge_Innavera »

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #36 on: September 01, 2006, 07:04:22 pm »
THings I do naked include the laundry, washing the car, and cleaning the shower. It just doesn't make sense otherwise!  ::) Of couse, the first only happens when I come back from a run and have to deposit the clothes I'm wearing into the washer, and the second only happens on midsummer nights.

Also, a note to Scott--copy your post here into your Daily Thoughts blog. Those insights are too good to languish here in the laundry room!!
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #37 on: September 02, 2006, 12:56:50 am »
THings I do naked include ... washing the car

Lee, do you get any strange looks (or appreciative glances!) from other customers at the car wash?

 ;D

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #38 on: September 02, 2006, 09:48:09 am »
LOL! No, I wash the car in my driveway (I live way out in the middle of nowhere in the Rocky Mountains, hope U can see it someday!)
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #39 on: November 01, 2006, 01:21:17 pm »
Thinking back to the scene of Alma doing laundry in the sink, there are many parallels to the companion scene of Jack doing laundry in the stream. We see both Alma and Jack from the back, although they are looking opposite ways. They both beat on the laundry, Alma with a washboard and Jack with a stick. They are both cleaning an item belonging to Ennis, Alma washing his undershirt and Jack washing his shirt. But the differences are telling. Of course, Alma is clothed while Jack is naked. And the contrast of the wild free-running stream to the sink in the choky little ranch house couldn't be more different!
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #40 on: November 01, 2006, 01:42:26 pm »
But the differences are telling. Of course, Alma is clothed while Jack is naked. And the contrast of the wild free-running stream to the sink in the choky little ranch house couldn't be more different!

LOL, I just posted about this in the nearly indiscernible moments thread. But it really belongs here. I think it's interesting that you hear the pounding of the washboard before you actually see Alma. The first time I saw the movie, I heard that and thought we were about to see Ennis and Alma in bed together. But -- we don't.

I don't think that's accidental.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #41 on: February 24, 2007, 12:52:28 pm »
Another reference to laundry from the story...when visiting Jack's mother and father, Ennis "bumps down the washboard road" in his truck. Ennis has been put "through the wringer" in many ways in this story and emerges a much different man.
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #42 on: March 22, 2007, 06:12:03 pm »
Yesterday I was at my yoga class and the instructor told us that the stretching and twisting exercises he was putting us through were meant to "wring out" the toxins from our inner organs just like water is wrung out of clothes by twisting them. He even showed us a wringing motion with his hands. I was reminded so much of Ennis, Brokeback Mountain, and this topic.

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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #43 on: March 22, 2007, 06:46:01 pm »
I was reminded so much of Ennis, Brokeback Mountain, and this topic.

Now, if only Ennis had taken up yoga!  ;)

I take a yoga class, too, on Thursdays. And I know I'm supposed to be concentrating on the positions, but every time my teacher talks about a "Twist" ...

Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #44 on: March 22, 2007, 07:53:31 pm »
So, Lee... you're yoga instructor didn't bring up the most *controversial* aspect of the concept of wringing I assume.
 ;)  ::)

Anyway, it's amazing how almost everything in daily life can eventually come to take on Brokie significance the more one gets engrossed in these discussions.



Hey, this is OT, but does anyone remember where we had that great old discussion of all the different definitions of the word "twist"?  I remember it was a really neat topic to think about.
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #45 on: March 22, 2007, 10:45:55 pm »
So, Lee... you're yoga instructor didn't bring up the most *controversial* aspect of the concept of wringing I assume.
 ;)  ::)

Anyway, it's amazing how almost everything in daily life can eventually come to take on Brokie significance the more one gets engrossed in these discussions.



Hey, this is OT, but does anyone remember where we had that great old discussion of all the different definitions of the word "twist"?  I remember it was a really neat topic to think about.

Well, now that you mention it, we were also treated to a talk about the importance of keeping the anal sphinchter tight and flexible! Is that controversial enuf for you??

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Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #46 on: March 22, 2007, 11:16:45 pm »
:o
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #47 on: March 23, 2007, 02:57:11 pm »
:o

We certainly do get into some rather esoteric subjects in yoga class, but, yes, it's an important element of overall health, but I won't gross you out with all the details!

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Re: The laundry and kitchen
« Reply #48 on: June 26, 2007, 03:31:12 pm »
We started out in the laundry, and after an extensive detour into the bathroom, we will presently head to the kitchen!!

We see Alma's kitchen several times in the movie. Here is, I believe, the second sighting of it:

« Last Edit: June 26, 2007, 03:38:42 pm by Front-Ranger »
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #49 on: July 04, 2007, 12:44:19 pm »
I must make a confession here: I've never seen the famous Wonder bread, either wrapped or unwrapped. Can someone help me out and post a picture or two of the Wonder bread that is supposedly sitting on Alma's kitchen counter?
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Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #50 on: July 04, 2007, 03:10:01 pm »
The theory was about two kitchen scenes with bread. But I expanded it to all three kitchen scenes.

We see all three of Alma's kitchens. And in all of them we see bread. And it's wrapped every time:

Kitchen of the lonesome ol' ranch. The bread is in the white Box right to Alma's back; under the left one of the kitchen cabinets.


Kitchen of the Riverton apartment; when Ennis gets Jack's first postcard.



Kitchen in Monroe's and Alma's house; Thanksgiving blow-up




The theory is that the bread represents Ennis's sexuality, respectively Alma's knowledge of it. In the first kitchen scene, we don't see the bread, but we (the audience) know it's there. And one (Alma) can sense the bread in there, because the color of the wrapping of the bread shines a little bit through. And it's in the ranchhouse we see Ennis doing what she hates - should have been a hint to her, shouldn't it?


In the second kitchen scene the bread was still in a box, but the box was open. More was about to be revealed to Alma: the reunion kiss follows shortly after this scene.

In the third kitchen scene everything is clear and laid out, no box where the bread is hidden in. Alma is about to expose Ennis, like the bread is exposed, lying openly.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #51 on: July 05, 2007, 09:16:37 am »
Thank you very much. At last I understand it and I don't have to Wonder any more!!
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Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #52 on: July 05, 2007, 11:30:15 am »
I think I may have found another bread moment (what an expression, lol). It's direclty after the reunion kiss, when they go into the appartment to greet Alma. And I think this is the famous Wonder bread you've heard of.

I didn't see it as bread because I don't know the brand and it's colors. But I saw it today on another thread (in adiabatic's diagram of the Riverton appartment) and then did a google picture search for it.

I think direclty left of Alma's arm we see Wonder bread in this scene.







And here is what Wonder bread looks like:



Can someone of the US BetterMostians please verify or invalidate this?

moremojo

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #53 on: July 05, 2007, 11:45:08 am »
Oh yes, that's almost certainly a Wonder Bread bag in that still, though it looks like there's very little bread left in the bag...maybe a slice or two at the very bottom. It also looks like the bag is untied, open...perhaps the cat is out of the bag, so to speak, at this point.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #54 on: July 05, 2007, 03:18:32 pm »
Great information. BTW, I read where Wonder Bread is celebrating its 85th anniversary, and moms are invited to write in and share their Wonder Bread stories. Now I have one, but I don't think it's what they had in mind, LOL!

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #55 on: July 05, 2007, 04:04:39 pm »
Great information. BTW, I read where Wonder Bread is celebrating its 85th anniversary, and moms are invited to write in and share their Wonder Bread stories. Now I have one, but I don't think it's what they had in mind, LOL!




Well, you're a mom and you have a Wonder Bread story to tell, so go for it  :)! Maybe you'll win a prize for the most unusual Wonder Bread story  :D.

"...The Wonder Bread I searched for more than a year...."  ;)

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #56 on: July 05, 2007, 04:46:49 pm »
Well golleee, that does look like a Wonder Bread wrapper.  Well, hunh.

Here' my Wonder Bread story - also one I don't think they want:  When I was a child, there were lots of Wonder Bread commercials on TV, and they talked about "building strong bodies 12 ways."  And there would often be a cool time lapse-esque film of a little white girl or boy growing, growing, growing to be a teenage basket ball player or cheerleader.

I always enjoyed those commercials, and ate my squishy Wonder Bread sandwiches with gusto.  But then, as I got older, I learned the truth about white bread in general, and how poor-quality it is, nutritionally.  And I was appalled - but the commercial made it sound like it was ESSENTIAL for good health.  It was my first lesson about lying in advertising.  Of course I now know dozens, hundreds, what feels like millions of examples of lies being told publically.  But that was the first, and it hurt.  Tarnished my view of the world, you know?

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #57 on: July 05, 2007, 05:10:59 pm »
But gosh, nutritional issues aside, those soft Wonder Bread slices were scrumptious to this little Texas kid. They made for the ideal peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches. Perhaps the wonder of Wonder Bread is how they made a product of dubious nutritional value taste so good!

Offline shortfiction

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #58 on: July 09, 2007, 02:02:08 pm »
After repeated viewings and readings, I hadn't thought much about this aspect until I caught your thread. 
Very well done and insightful
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #59 on: July 10, 2007, 03:39:08 pm »
After repeated viewings and readings, I hadn't thought much about this aspect until I caught your thread. 
Very well done and insightful

Welcome to my beautiful laundrette! Altho I'm sure Alma didn't think that way about it. I've been to Wyoming, and clothes get dirty there, even tho your not a roughneck or a ranch hand, but an ordinary tourist!!
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #60 on: March 08, 2008, 01:41:40 am »
I'm glad you're visiting my launderette tonite. Welcome!
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Marge_Innavera

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #61 on: March 08, 2008, 01:18:20 pm »
Welcome to my beautiful laundrette! Altho I'm sure Alma didn't think that way about it.

Yeah, but in a museum job that I worked at for several years, I tried doing laundry the old-fashioned way a few times, and always think of that in the scene where you see Alma scrubbing clothes on a washboard. Even if she didn't have to build a fire to heat water and then agitate the clothes by hand, like in pioneer days, I can really appreciate the appeal that living over a laundromat would have.   ;D  Not to mention Wyoming having such a cold climate; their apartment would have been that much more cozy in the winter.

Would love to stay in that place someday, if they ever decide to rent it out by the night!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #62 on: March 08, 2008, 09:43:12 pm »
This is waaaayyy OT, so I'm only posting a link. But here is an essay from the Iowa Review called Laundry, which explores the task of doing laundry and its larger metaphoric meanings. I liked it, and I thought others might possibly find it interesting.

http://www.uiowa.edu/%7Eiareview/mainpages/stanton.html


Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #63 on: March 08, 2008, 11:48:44 pm »
This is waaaayyy OT, so I'm only posting a link. But here is an essay from the Iowa Review called Laundry, which explores the task of doing laundry and its larger metaphoric meanings. I liked it, and I thought others might possibly find it interesting.

http://www.uiowa.edu/%7Eiareview/mainpages/stanton.html



 ;D I like the idea of bring outside resources/reference materials to these discussions Bud.  And, it's nice and reassuring to know that Brokies aren't the only ones who feel that laundry can have deep metaphorical significance.


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Re: The laundry
« Reply #64 on: March 09, 2008, 12:04:57 am »
;D I like the idea of bring outside resources/reference materials to these discussions Bud.  And, it's nice and reassuring to know that Brokies aren't the only ones who feel that laundry can have deep metaphorical significance.

I definitely agree! Our matriarch Annie Proulx does this all the time...cites many sources of inspiration, including history, art, poetry, and Hamley's Ranch Catalogue!

Yes, I love laundry and all its allusions. In fact, in my laundry room I have a series of photographs on the wall which I took years ago. I used to go into people's laundry rooms and poke around and take pictures. I found all that stuff amazing!! THere's also some needlepoint that my mother made for me hanging over the washer. It says, "Please don't do my laundry" LOL!
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #65 on: March 09, 2008, 06:53:48 am »
Yes, I love laundry and all its allusions. In fact, in my laundry room I have a series of photographs on the wall which I took years ago. I used to go into people's laundry rooms and poke around and take pictures. I found all that stuff amazing!! THere's also some needlepoint that my mother made for me hanging over the washer. It says, "Please don't do my laundry" LOL!



My first thought was: no way I would let you take pictures of my collected laundry mess. And then the sentence in blue: don't do my laundry! How true. My mother-in-law sometimes uses the chance to dive into my dirty laundry when she is at our house and I'm not there. I hate it! She knows it, I've made it cristal clear (and I'm not the shy type). But I guess that's just a typical mother-in-law thing to do: being annoying from time to time  :laugh:.


I just wanted to point out what an intimate thing doing the laundry for someone else is, but then I noticed I pointed out exactly the same thought already two years ago  ::).  Guess I better go and reread the whole thread before I repeat the same ole stuff.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #66 on: March 09, 2008, 11:26:38 am »
In fact, in my laundry room I have a series of photographs on the wall which I took years ago. I used to go into people's laundry rooms and poke around and take pictures.

Good idea for a photo project, FRiend. When I went to italy last fall with a group of old friends, one woman in the group made a project of photographing laundry hanging from lines, suspended between those beautiful old buildings. She got some really interesting images.

Guess I better go and reread the whole thread before I repeat the same ole stuff.

If we had to worry about that, I'd spend weeks just doing the back-reading! ;D


Offline BlissC

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #67 on: March 09, 2008, 11:46:17 am »
Well I've not read the whole thread (read bits and skim-read through others) and I've not been here that long, but I'm finding it fascinating reading about all the different symbolisms in the film (and in the story - though it's a while since I read the story - I really need to read it again), and while I'd spotted various bits of symbolism, I'd not noticed the laundry one, though now thinking about the film again I see it. Fascinating thread.


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Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #68 on: March 09, 2008, 01:04:26 pm »
I've skimmed through the article K linked. I found it a fascinating read, but was too impatient to read it thoroughly right now. Anyway, two quotes from it:

In television commercials for laundry detergent, the housewife sensually presses her face into a soft, warm, fragrant, fluffy towel which, along with a tidy bowl, signifies her success as a wife and mother, as a woman, her love for her family. Laundry signifies love."

Yup, we've all seen this image countless times in different variations. This is exactly what Ennis does with Alma Junior's sweater after she left. The way he cares tenderly about a piece of clothing shows his love for its owner. The fact that it's not freshly washed, but still carries her scent, makes it even more poignant, IMO.


"When the ritual [of doing the laundry] is over, our clothes are clean and folded, and a kind of lesser order is restored. Dirt is gone; life starts anew. The bodies we put into these fresh clothes may do something different this time around."

I think this is a very interesting thought. New chances. We haven't discussed this aspect of doing laundry yet. When Jack does the laundry naked after TS1, something new starts. Before they had been friends, but now they are also lovers, a new part of their relationship begins.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #69 on: March 09, 2008, 01:52:53 pm »
"When the ritual [of doing the laundry] is over, our clothes are clean and folded, and a kind of lesser order is restored. Dirt is gone; life starts anew. The bodies we put into these fresh clothes may do something different this time around."

I think this is a very interesting thought. New chances. We haven't discussed this aspect of doing laundry yet. When Jack does the laundry naked after TS1, something new starts. Before they had been friends, but now they are also lovers, a new part of their relationship begins.

Good point, Bud, and way to connect the outside resource with the discussion of BBM!


Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #70 on: March 09, 2008, 02:46:56 pm »
I've skimmed through the article K linked. I found it a fascinating read, but was too impatient to read it thoroughly right now. Anyway, two quotes from it:

In television commercials for laundry detergent, the housewife sensually presses her face into a soft, warm, fragrant, fluffy towel which, along with a tidy bowl, signifies her success as a wife and mother, as a woman, her love for her family. Laundry signifies love."

Yup, we've all seen this image countless times in different variations. This is exactly what Ennis does with Alma Junior's sweater after she left. The way he cares tenderly about a piece of clothing shows his love for its owner. The fact that it's not freshly washed, but still carries her scent, makes it even more poignant, IMO.


"When the ritual [of doing the laundry] is over, our clothes are clean and folded, and a kind of lesser order is restored. Dirt is gone; life starts anew. The bodies we put into these fresh clothes may do something different this time around."

I think this is a very interesting thought. New chances. We haven't discussed this aspect of doing laundry yet. When Jack does the laundry naked after TS1, something new starts. Before they had been friends, but now they are also lovers, a new part of their relationship begins.


Yeah Chrissi!  These are great quotations!  I completely agree with the idea that laundry is a really intimate act.  And, I know this is repeating things said before... but to see both Jack and Alma doing Ennis's laundry just seems so important in terms of their status as rivals for Ennis's affection/attention/commitment.  I think in the scene where we see Alma at the clothes line and Ennis's truck is seen driving towards the ranch in the distance... I think that brown and blue plaid shirt is the shirt he was wearing during TS1.  And, of course, the force of the wind here combined with the laundry is huge.  And, in the scene where Jack nude, washing Ennis's shirt in the stream... it just seems so important that that's one of the paired shirts at the end. 

I wonder why we never see Ennis doing laundry?  I mean, we see him doing other domestic things (both on Brokeback and at home with Alma... even helping wash dishes at Monroe's house), but never specifically the laundry.  But, he is certainly apparently super sensitive to clothing the scent of clothing, etc. (both Alma Jr.'s sweater and the paired shirts)... so maybe he's meant to be viewed as the recipient of love... if laundry is meant to be a symbol of love/devotion... in this particular context.

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Offline elomelo

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #71 on: March 13, 2008, 12:33:30 pm »
Yeah Chrissi!  These are great quotations!  I completely agree with the idea that laundry is a really intimate act.  And, I know this is repeating things said before... but to see both Jack and Alma doing Ennis's laundry just seems so important in terms of their status as rivals for Ennis's affection/attention/commitment.  I think in the scene where we see Alma at the clothes line and Ennis's truck is seen driving towards the ranch in the distance... I think that brown and blue plaid shirt is the shirt he was wearing during TS1.  And, of course, the force of the wind here combined with the laundry is huge.  And, in the scene where Jack nude, washing Ennis's shirt in the stream... it just seems so important that that's one of the paired shirts at the end. 

I wonder why we never see Ennis doing laundry?  I mean, we see him doing other domestic things (both on Brokeback and at home with Alma... even helping wash dishes at Monroe's house), but never specifically the laundry.  But, he is certainly apparently super sensitive to clothing the scent of clothing, etc. (both Alma Jr.'s sweater and the paired shirts)... so maybe he's meant to be viewed as the recipient of love... if laundry is meant to be a symbol of love/devotion... in this particular context.



\ :o  I never noticed that Jack was washing Ennis's clothes in the river too! Good observation!

And actually, when he's washing the shirt after their first sexual encounter, maybe the washing signifies cleansing and forgiveness like water has throughout various religions and stories. As in, Jack is forigiving Ennis for the denial that is soon to come and cleansing both their shirt signifies a new beginning for them, in terms of their friendship and newfound relationship which starts off as sexual tension and release, then develops into something transceding merely sex.

And Ennis as the recepient of love? Brilliant. :) Maybe...hmm, not sure if this makes much sense, but in claiming something that he has lost. Losing Jack and Alma Jr. impacts him, and their clothing is the remnants of the different loves in his life.

- another thought, though I don't know if it's relevant; Jack is shirtless the second night in the tent. You'd assume it's warm but then we see Ennis rubbing his hands in front of the fire...? Lack of shirt = lack of a barrier? So he's showing Ennis that he's just as vulnerable without that protection of the shirt, and that he's "forgiven" Ennis. Hm..thoughts, anyone? :D

Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #72 on: March 13, 2008, 01:03:51 pm »
Great post, Elomelo. The idea of the shirt-washing as a sort of cleansing ritual is really interesting. Especially because water is so prevalent throughout their relationship and seems to usually indicate love, or progress in their relationship.

As for Jack being shirtless in the tent, I agree with your interpretation. I've noticed that fewer layers of clothing often suggests more vulnerability or openness. And more layers means being more closed off or resistant. Their second night together, they're both wearing one less layer of clothing than they were the first night. At the reunion, Ennis is just wearing a shirt, though Jack is wearing a vest (hedging his bets, in case Ennis wasn't ready to get back into it again?). And later, camping by the lake, Ennis wears just a shirt (am I remembering this correctly? I haven't seen it since last May, and my memory of some of these details is getting foggy!  ::)) until Jack mentions the sweet life and Ennis is resistant -- then he puts on a jacket and hat.


Offline elomelo

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #73 on: March 13, 2008, 01:15:33 pm »
Great post, Elomelo. The idea of the shirt-washing as a sort of cleansing ritual is really interesting. Especially because water is so prevalent throughout their relationship and seems to usually indicate love, or progress in their relationship.

As for Jack being shirtless in the tent, I agree with your interpretation. I've noticed that fewer layers of clothing often suggests more vulnerability or openness. And more layers means being more closed off or resistant. For example, at the reunion, Ennis is just wearing a shirt, though Jack is wearing a vest (hedging his bets, in case Ennis wasn't ready to get back into it again?). And later, camping by the lake, Ennis wears just a shirt until Jack mentions the sweet life and Ennis is resistant -- then he puts on a jacket and hat.



Yeah, Ennis does tend to increase the amount of clothing as the years go by, like the denim jacket when he recieves the last postcard. He's also wearing a jacket in his trailer when Junior comes to see him, once again building the defense, though Junior takes off her own jacket showing she bears no hostility towards him and comes in peace.

And in the end, they both are wearing many layers, hat included though there's no sun, during the argument but this time, "the walls fall down" as they clutch each other and Ennis sobs, truly allowing his emotions to be shown so nakedly. Despite the layers, he's so vulnerable and Jack's layers are a sanctuary to him.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #74 on: March 13, 2008, 01:35:07 pm »
Plus, when they're leaving the mountain, they're in shirts, but by the time they're parting in Signal -- where presumably it would be warmer -- they're wearing jackets, maintaining distance.


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Re: The laundry
« Reply #75 on: March 13, 2008, 01:53:19 pm »
Lack of shirt = lack of a barrier? So he's showing Ennis that he's just as vulnerable without that protection of the shirt, and that he's "forgiven" Ennis. Hm..thoughts, anyone? :D
I'd say you're right, elomelo, especially since Jack says to Ennis, "s'alright, s'alright."

In the story, Ennis wears the same clothes winter and summer, he's quite numb to the weather and the passage of time. Jack gets more duded up as time goes by, wears more flamboyant colors, and needs protection from the cold, because he's more sensitive and open to life in general.
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Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #76 on: March 13, 2008, 03:23:13 pm »
Thinking of Ennis and his jackets... and the layers they wear upon coming down from Brokeback... Where did he get that yellow raincoat?  He's wearing it when Aguirre is counting the sheep and says "ranch stiffs ain't never no good."

Did Aguirre supply him with the yellow raincoat?  It can't possibly have fit in Ennis's little brown paper bag.
 ???

<img src="http://www.divshare.com/img/3121106-7ba.jpg" border="0" />


« Last Edit: March 13, 2008, 10:53:19 pm by atz75 »
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #77 on: March 14, 2008, 10:30:39 am »
Did Aguirre supply him with the yellow raincoat?  It can't possibly have fit in Ennis's little brown paper bag.
 ???


Yes, I think the rain coat is supplied by Aguirre. Ennis wore it earlier, in the scene where Jack's mare crow-hopped only a little and he said "No more beans" before leaving.






And later, camping by the lake, Ennis wears just a shirt (am I remembering this correctly? I haven't seen it since last May, and my memory of some of these details is getting foggy!  ::)) until Jack mentions the sweet life and Ennis is resistant -- then he puts on a jacket and hat.

Nope, Ennis wears his corduroy jacket before Jack mentions the sweet life. After Jack's comment he sits up and puts his hat on.


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Re: The laundry
« Reply #78 on: March 14, 2008, 12:16:23 pm »
I'd say you're right, elomelo, especially since Jack says to Ennis, "s'alright, s'alright."

In the story, Ennis wears the same clothes winter and summer, he's quite numb to the weather and the passage of time. Jack gets more duded up as time goes by, wears more flamboyant colors, and needs protection from the cold, because he's more sensitive and open to life in general.

It has always struck me that the 2 times we see both of them without any clothes,are after the 4 year break.They have the totally uninhibited reunion kiss and then we see them without clothes in the motel.It seems for the 1st time they are both on an equal footing.The joy of the reunion and to some extent acceptance by both of their love is signalled by no clothes and complete vulnerability of them both.Each giving of each other freely.
Also interesting, in the script as soon as Jack says he has redlined it all the way there,what about you,The script is for Enis to pull on his shirt.As in barrier up again its getting awqward.
The only other time we see them both minus clothes, (the subject of what Ennis witnessed has yet to be discussed.)Is when the 2 of them ,in one of the films few moments of uninhibited joy,jump off the cliff into the lake.
At that point in the film I almost thought they might have a chance.They were both so in synch with each other.The fabulous reunion,followed by a few days together.
It seemed vaguely possible that Jack might persuade Ennis round.
Wrong of course as it is followed by Enis childhood revelation.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #79 on: March 14, 2008, 12:21:16 pm »

Yes, I think the rain coat is supplied by Aguirre. Ennis wore it earlier, in the scene where Jack's mare crow-hopped only a little and he said "No more beans" before leaving.



Nope, Ennis wears his corduroy jacket before Jack mentions the sweet life. After Jack's comment he sits up and puts his hat on.



Thanks Chrissi!

I'd forgotten about Ennis wearing that yellow jacket earlier.

Also, now looking at this pic:


<img src="http://www.divshare.com/img/3121106-7ba.jpg" border="0" />


It occurs to me that Jack is also wearing an unusual jacket.  It's not his normal green coat with the fuzzy collar.

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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #80 on: March 14, 2008, 12:39:20 pm »
Nope, Ennis wears his corduroy jacket before Jack mentions the sweet life. After Jack's comment he sits up and puts his hat on.





Thanks for clearing that up, Chrissi. I really should have just gone to Striped Wall myself, but I don't go there often enough so I always find it a little confusing getting around. You are such a whiz at it that when something comes up, you probably just think, "Oh, Ennis in the "sending up a prayer" scene? That would be good old screencap No. 3,478 -- one of my favorites!"

 :)




Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #81 on: March 14, 2008, 12:54:44 pm »

Thanks for clearing that up, Chrissi. I really should have just gone to Striped Wall myself, but I don't go there often enough so I always find it a little confusing getting around. You are such a whiz at it that when something comes up, you probably just think, "Oh, Ennis in the "sending up a prayer" scene? That would be good old screencap No. 3,478 -- one of my favorites!"

 :)


What's the Striped Wall?? ???

I've always been curious about where folks (like Chrissi!) get all of their great film stills.  I usually get mine via hit-or-miss google image searches, etc.

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #82 on: March 14, 2008, 01:01:07 pm »
The galllery at http://www.stripedwall.com/

I spent a HUGE amount of time there recently gathering all of the images for the Tarot Deck. And now I have a wonderful collection of my favorite screen caps! But it took me about 6 hours of work!!

Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #83 on: March 14, 2008, 01:03:07 pm »
The galllery at http://www.stripedwall.com/

I spent a HUGE amount of time there recently gathering all of the images for the Tarot Deck. And now I have a wonderful collection of my favorite screen caps! But it took me about 6 hours of work!!



Thanks Lee!  I'll have fun with that this weekend I think. 8)

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Offline serious crayons

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #84 on: March 14, 2008, 02:17:18 pm »
Thanks Lee!  I'll have fun with that this weekend I think. 8)

Yup, it's an invaluable resource! I sometimes think the site could be a bit more intuitively organized -- at least for me, I find it difficult to get around, there's a lot of hit-and-missing involved -- but you couldn't ask for a better collection of BBM pix (and screencaps from some other movies, too, if you're interested).



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Re: The laundry
« Reply #85 on: March 14, 2008, 03:42:39 pm »

Thanks for clearing that up, Chrissi. I really should have just gone to Striped Wall myself, but I don't go there often enough so I always find it a little confusing getting around. You are such a whiz at it that when something comes up, you probably just think, "Oh, Ennis in the "sending up a prayer" scene? That would be good old screencap No. 3,478 -- one of my favorites!"
 :)


 :laugh: No, it's not like that. But I know my way around the scenes in BBM, therefore it's easy to search for a specific picture.

But in the past stripedwall had been more convenient to use. They used to have BBM divided into six sections and you could directly click on the part of the movie you're looking for. Now you have to browse through the whole movie if you're looking for a scene from the end. At least you can go in big steps, always forwarding to the next 500 pics.

One tip: it's better to bookmark directly the first page with BBM screencaps, so you don't have to navigate around their site every time. Here's the link: http://www.stripedwall.com/gallery.php?page=movies/Brokeback
I looove stripedwall. It's by far the biggest collection of BBM screencaps. God bless them and let them keep it up forever.

Offline elomelo

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #86 on: March 14, 2008, 03:46:20 pm »
Ooh, thanks for the link!

I always wondered where everyone got those image  :)

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #87 on: March 14, 2008, 04:40:47 pm »
Thanks Chrissi!

I'd forgotten about Ennis wearing that yellow jacket earlier.

Also, now looking at this pic:


<img src="http://www.divshare.com/img/3121106-7ba.jpg" border="0" />


It occurs to me that Jack is also wearing an unusual jacket.  It's not his normal green coat with the fuzzy collar.


Yup, you're right. Here's a better pic of the jacket. It's not actually in the movie (and therefore not on stripedwall), but provides a good look at the jacket. It's the only time we see him in this jacket/raincoat.



When they go down the mountain, they both wear only shirts. When the sheep are counted, both wear raincoats. When they part at Jack's truck, both wear their usual jackets.


Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #88 on: March 19, 2008, 08:35:41 pm »

One tip: it's better to bookmark directly the first page with BBM screencaps, so you don't have to navigate around their site every time. Here's the link: http://www.stripedwall.com/gallery.php?page=movies/Brokeback
I looove stripedwall. It's by far the biggest collection of BBM screencaps. God bless them and let them keep it up forever.


 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
Geez!!!  I don't know how I survived all this time without knowing about and using this website!  Just awesome. I finally checked this site out this evening.

And, Chrissi, thanks for the specific link to the Brokeback page... I was very confused when I went to the main Striped Wall page initially and tried to navigate from there.  I kept getting error messages.

But, this link you provided here worked just fine!

Really, this totally rocks!  :D :-*

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #89 on: March 20, 2008, 05:05:27 am »

 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
Geez!!!  I don't know how I survived all this time without knowing about and using this website!  Just awesome. I finally checked this site out this evening.

And, Chrissi, thanks for the specific link to the Brokeback page... I was very confused when I went to the main Striped Wall page initially and tried to navigate from there.  I kept getting error messages.

But, this link you provided here worked just fine!

Really, this totally rocks!  :D :-*


Aww, you're welcome sweetheart  :-*

I also don't know how any Brokie can survive without the stripedwall site  :laugh:
The only less than optimal thing is that the screencaps are pretty dark. But with Picasa it's easy to brighten them up.

Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #90 on: March 20, 2008, 10:17:15 am »
Thanks again Chrissi,

It's so exciting to have this resource!  Watch out Open Forum!  I many be posting up a storm with new visual observations!

On my computer the screencaps look pretty nice.  So, maybe it's a matter of adjusting computer monitors.  I discovered this the DVDs of BBM too... changing the "brightness" levels on my TV makes a massive difference.


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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #91 on: January 07, 2009, 05:23:27 pm »
I wonder if the metaphor of the sink, which we have been discussing lately, is related to the Laundry metaphor.
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Re: The laundry
« Reply #92 on: July 28, 2009, 01:09:38 pm »
This is waaaayyy OT, so I'm only posting a link. But here is an essay from the Iowa Review called Laundry, which explores the task of doing laundry and its larger metaphoric meanings. I liked it, and I thought others might possibly find it interesting.

http://www.uiowa.edu/%7Eiareview/mainpages/stanton.html

Friend, I just had the chance to follow this link, a year and a half after you posted it, and it's a fascinating essay about generations of a family from the POV of the laundry. The author is right: laundry is love!! Especially when you consider that her mother ended up washing an estimated 35,000 cloth diapers in her lifetime!!
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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #93 on: May 09, 2010, 11:33:23 pm »
Jack's washing machine was the middle of a roaring stream, and his laundry room was the great outdoors! In contrast, Ennis timidly rolled up his jeans when he had to wash out the coffee pot, but his laundry business had enuff of an effect on him to make him look up admiringly at Jack on the mountainside.

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #94 on: September 05, 2010, 07:03:14 pm »
The Laundry Room is where it all comes together.

I was thinking just now about how Ennis tried to "wash everything he could reach", how he tried to clean things up, make things all right, all pure and simple and acceptable. Even during the last days of the story, he threw all the horseblankets from the Coffeepot Ranch into his old pickup truck, took them into town and washed them in the car wash. Before leaving town, he ducked into Linda Higgins' gift shop looking for a postcard of Brokeback Mountain. Linda was removing a sopping wet coffee filter from her coffeepot, throwing it away. She ended up ordering a hundred postcards of Brokeback Mountain, just so Ennis could have his one. That's how I remember it anyway. Your mileage may differ.

I also remember how Ennis stuck a toothbrush in his mouth as he was packing to go off with Jack on a "fishing trip". Pawing through the closet, he sniffed a shirt or two in order to determine if they were clean enuff to take with him. And Alma, until they moved to the Riverton laundromat, had had to wash his shirts at the sink on an old washboard. Years later, she would be at the sink with Ennis again, sluicing plates, and talking about his fishing with Jack. "That line hadn't touched water in its life" she said then. And it was like the water of Brokeback Mountain called out to "its domestic cousin" just then, bringing the transformative power of nature into that little kitchen, overwhelming Ennis and causing him to threaten her with the fire of a burning bracelet. She'd overstepped his line with her line about the line.  ;)

After too short a time, it was Ennis who was on the washboard, bumping down the washboard road that zigzagged to Lightning Flat, on the welling prairie. Again, he visits a closet, again he searches for a scent remaining in a shirt. He finds only the remains of blood from a "gushing nosebleed" 20 years ago on Brokeback Mountain. Then, he finds the hidden shirt, his own shirt, "lost, he thought, long ago in some damn laundry." And he takes the shirts, takes them to his own closet. Through a few stinging tears, he says, "Jack, I swear--" as blood brothers do. What he did after that, we know little (Heath said "not much"), but we do know sometimes the pillow was wet, sometimes the sheets. Love is truly a force of nature, like the natural force of water. And like nature it is inscrutable, unknowable, inescapable, uncontrollable. All you can do is stand in awe before Nature's power and beauty and do what she compels you to do.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #95 on: September 05, 2010, 10:29:36 pm »
My first thought was: no way I would let you take pictures of my collected laundry mess. And then the sentence in blue: don't do my laundry! How true. My mother-in-law sometimes uses the chance to dive into my dirty laundry when she is at our house and I'm not there. I hate it! She knows it, I've made it cristal clear (and I'm not the shy type). But I guess that's just a typical mother-in-law thing to do: being annoying from time to time  :laugh:.

Pardon me for responding to this after all this time, but this brings to mind an encounter with my own mother-in-law and laundry. My husband, my toddler son and I were at my in-laws house visiting, and we were preparing to go to a very ritzy hotel later that day (It was the Ritz Carlton in Laguna Niguel). Just as we were about to leave, my son toddled over to the brick fireplace and bumped into it, gashing his gums and bringing blood. My husband scooped him up and handed him to me and I took care of my son's injury and comforted him, all the time with a diaper draped over my shoulder to handle the blood, spit-up, etc. While I was doing that, my husband took off his polo shirt, handed it to his mother, who rushed it to the laundry room and emerged a half-hour later with the shirt all washed and pressed. She handed it back to him and he put it on. Then crisply dressed father, goopy mother, and goopy son left for the hotel, and that's how we entered the hotel lobby an hour later!! No, they don't do it to be annoying, it's strategic, just marking their property!!
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #96 on: February 18, 2013, 11:38:26 pm »
I love coming back to the Laundry Room every once in a while and just hanging out. Anyone understand this strange behavior?
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #97 on: January 19, 2015, 10:49:45 pm »
Thinking about this tonight. These days I spend maybe 10 minutes every two weeks doing laundry. I almost miss hanging out in the laundry room!

Fortunately, it's also the cat's room, so I go in there every day to bring her food and fresh water.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #98 on: January 20, 2015, 05:13:27 pm »
I love coming back to the Laundry Room every once in a while and just hanging out. Anyone understand this strange behavior?

I would guess it depends on whether or not there's someone in the laundry room with you.

I've used the laundry room at my building only once, it's $1.50 to wash and then  $1.50 to dry.

I generally take everything over to mom and dad's place and have lunch with them, catch up, while the laundry is running.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #99 on: January 20, 2015, 09:48:07 pm »
Oh, that explains a few things, friend Chuck! I was trying to keep myself from inquiring about how you seemed to spend a big chunk of your weekend doing laundry, and now I find out that it's your time to socialize with your folks as well. So, that is a very good use of your time. Me, I toss a mixed load into the washer and do other things while it does its thing. It has a buzzer which tells me when to transfer the clothes into the dryer, which takes about a half a minute. Then, another buzzer tells me when to retrieve the clothes and put them into my closet and dresser. Time spent: maybe 15 minutes, altogether, once every two weeks.

Between the washer, dryer, and cat accoutrements, there's no room for anyone else, so it's just me in the laundry room!

I wonder if Alma had to go downstairs to the laundrymat to do her family's laundry. Probably so, but that's way better than using the scrub board in the sink, like she had to do at the old lonesome ranch house!
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #100 on: January 20, 2015, 10:35:54 pm »
I wonder if Alma had to go downstairs to the laundrymat to do her family's laundry. Probably so, but that's way better than using the scrub board in the sink, like she had to do at the old lonesome ranch house!

I'd sure consider a coin-op laundry a big improvement over a washboard in the kitchen sink!
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #101 on: January 21, 2015, 12:18:48 pm »
I would too, especially with two toddlers in diapers and a husband who wiped his bloody nose on his sleeve and his wet hands on his pants! Not to mention the pillow/sheets.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #102 on: January 21, 2015, 02:17:07 pm »
I would too, especially with two toddlers in diapers and a husband who wiped his bloody nose on his sleeve and his wet hands on his pants! Not to mention the pillow/sheets.

How do you warsh sheets without a warshing machine?  ???

Must need a big warsh tub.  :(
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #103 on: January 21, 2015, 10:24:34 pm »
Oh, that explains a few things, friend Chuck! I was trying to keep myself from inquiring about how you seemed to spend a big chunk of your weekend doing laundry, and now I find out that it's your time to socialize with your folks as well. So, that is a very good use of your time. Me, I toss a mixed load into the washer and do other things while it does its thing. It has a buzzer which tells me when to transfer the clothes into the dryer, which takes about a half a minute. Then, another buzzer tells me when to retrieve the clothes and put them into my closet and dresser. Time spent: maybe 15 minutes, altogether, once every two weeks.

Hiya Lee.

When it comes to my laundry, it seems to be a situation of 'six of one, half-dozen of the other'.

If I opt to do my laundry at home, it costs me $10.00, but I'm home, so I can get stuff done around the apartment.

If I opt to visit my parents, the laundry is done for free, however, I'm away from home, so anything I need to do must wait until I get back home.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #104 on: January 22, 2015, 10:23:13 am »
If I should ever decide to move to a new home (except maybe an old folks' home), lack of my own washer and dryer will be a deal breaker. I've lived too long with the convenience of my own washer and dryer to go back to having to share laundry equipment.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #105 on: January 22, 2015, 09:24:24 pm »
what I would love to have is a dish washer, but there's no room in this kitchen.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #106 on: January 22, 2015, 09:39:45 pm »
what I would love to have is a dish washer, but there's no room in this kitchen.

A dishwasher I could live without, but a washer and dryer, no.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline brian

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #107 on: January 22, 2015, 11:58:02 pm »
When I bought my first house, after 6 years in an owned apartment which we call a unit, there was a dsishwasher. After a few years I sold it as I only very ocasionally used it. 25 years later I moved to NZ and there is a dishwasher again, I had the kitchen completely remodelled, new cupboards, stove etc. so the only original piece is the dishwasher .Again not a lot of use but I am told I should run it once per month. I wash up once per day, after breakfast, and occasionally I am rushing out so there is 2 days dishes and then I use it. However I think loading and unloading is about as much effort as washing up.
Clothes washer is essential, have always had one of those. Had a drier for a few years, it was 2nd hand, given to me by my sister and broke down so I got rid of it. Hardly ever used it anyway.  As you probably know, most people in Australia and NZ dry clothes outside on the clothes line. Here in winter I often have to hang the clothes in front of the heat pump at night in winter to make sure they are fully dry.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #108 on: January 23, 2015, 09:42:36 am »
When it comes to my laundry, it seems to be a situation of 'six of one, half-dozen of the other'.

If I opt to do my laundry at home, it costs me $10.00, but I'm home, so I can get stuff done around the apartment.

If I opt to visit my parents, the laundry is done for free, however, I'm away from home, so anything I need to do must wait until I get back home.

But wait, you forgot to factor one important thing into the equation: the pleasure for you of seeing your parents, and for them of seeing you. That weights the scale way over to that side.

So it's more like six of one, 600 of the other.

Plus, as long as we're doing the full tally, you also save the cost of the lunch. So it's six of one, 607 of the other.



Offline serious crayons

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #109 on: January 23, 2015, 09:47:30 am »
A dishwasher I could live without, but a washer and dryer, no.

I've had both for 20 years, so it would be hard to give up.

For people who live alone, as I will be in a few years, there's such a thing as a dishwasher that's about half the length (vertically) as a regular one. It's like the top half of a dishwasher, so it doesn't require as much bending, which is important as you age, which none of us are.

But it would solve a problem I sometimes have, where I'm out of one thing, like coffee mugs or forks, but the dishwasher isn't quite full enough to run.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #110 on: January 23, 2015, 10:37:58 am »
For people who live alone, as I will be in a few years, there's such a thing as a dishwasher that's about half the length (vertically) as a regular one. It's like the top half of a dishwasher, so it doesn't require as much bending, which is important as you age, which none of us are.

But it would solve a problem I sometimes have, where I'm out of one thing, like coffee mugs or forks, but the dishwasher isn't quite full enough to run.

I don't really like a dishwasher; for a one-person household, I think it's really an extravagant waste of energy. But since I have one, I use it once a week so the seal doesn't dry out. I never use it for cookware--that I wash up by hand as it gets used--and I just manage my use of tableware so that it takes a week to fill up the dishwasher, and it gets run once a week, usually on Friday evenings after supper.

And if I'm using my mother's silver flatware, I wash that by hand anyway.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #111 on: January 23, 2015, 09:47:38 pm »
But wait, you forgot to factor one important thing into the equation: the pleasure for you of seeing your parents, and for them of seeing you. That weights the scale way over to that side.

So it's more like six of one, 600 of the other.

Plus, as long as we're doing the full tally, you also save the cost of the lunch. So it's six of one, 607 of the other.


who says seeing my parents is a pleasure?  :o   LOL   Just kidding, yes, you're right about that, so it does outweigh the time saving aspect of doing it at home.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #112 on: January 28, 2018, 05:00:41 pm »
Hey, Cellar Dweller who doesn't live in a cellar anymore (while I do now!), Alma would agree with you that line-drying is the best way to finish the laundry!

Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

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Re: The laundry
« Reply #113 on: January 28, 2018, 05:08:12 pm »


Here she is, thanks to Pentheslea.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline brian

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #114 on: January 28, 2018, 06:00:10 pm »
I doubt Alma had much choice  ;D
I am the same age as Ennis and do remember Mum washing when I was a child. My sister and I were just discussing a cousin who is causing all sorts of problems at the moment because, now aged 89, she has schizoid/paranoia and developing dementia. Apparently Mum never liked her and used to complain that she and her then husband always came for an unannounced visit on Mondays. Monday was washing day. Clothes in the boiler tub, wrung out by hand and carted, still heavy, to the line. I well remember Mum being excited when we got a spin drying machine which was spun by water. I do not know when washing machines became widely available, thankfully by the time I first moved from living at home in 1971. I had 2 rooms at the back of a house with a separate shower/toilet and use of the laundry in the same shed which the owner of the house left for my use on Saturdays.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #115 on: January 28, 2018, 06:21:16 pm »
Hey, Cellar Dweller who doesn't live in a cellar anymore (while I do now!), Alma would agree with you that line-drying is the best way to finish the laundry!


It certainly costs less!!!


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #116 on: January 28, 2018, 06:28:29 pm »
I doubt Alma had much choice  ;D
I am the same age as Ennis and do remember Mum washing when I was a child. My sister and I were just discussing a cousin who is causing all sorts of problems at the moment because, now aged 89, she has schizoid/paranoia and developing dementia. Apparently Mum never liked her and used to complain that she and her then husband always came for an unannounced visit on Mondays. Monday was washing day. Clothes in the boiler tub, wrung out by hand and carted, still heavy, to the line. I well remember Mum being excited when we got a spin drying machine which was spun by water. I do not know when washing machines became widely available, thankfully by the time I first moved from living at home in 1971. I had 2 rooms at the back of a house with a separate shower/toilet and use of the laundry in the same shed which the owner of the house left for my use on Saturdays.


I can remember going to my grandmother's house, and among the stuff she had in her hoard was an old washing machine that had the two rollers that you fed the clothes through to get the excess water out.










Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #117 on: January 29, 2018, 10:43:04 am »

I can remember going to my grandmother's house, and among the stuff she had in her hoard was an old washing machine that had the two rollers that you fed the clothes through to get the excess water out.










It's called a wringer washer. My grandmother had one, too, and she was still using it when I was a child. My grandmother's looked a lot like your grandmother's except I think they were different brands. Those rollers were called wringers, hence the name "wringer washer." Once upon a time those wringers had to be turned by hand, with a crank, but from the photo, it appears this machine has powered wringers, as did my grandmother's.

Notice the machine is on casters so it can be moved to wherever it's water supply came from, or maybe that was because of the drain. I don't remember how the water was drained when the laundry was done.

There used to be a saying that went something like "See you in the wash if I don't get caught in the wringer." That saying was clearly inspired by the washing machine.

In my time I've probably known some speed queens. ...  ::)
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #118 on: January 29, 2018, 07:38:11 pm »
There used to be a saying that went something like "See you in the wash if I don't get caught in the wringer." That saying was clearly inspired by the washing machine.

In my time I've probably known some speed queens. ...  ::)


:laugh:

 There are times that I wonder if that machine would've been worth money.  At the time of the hoard cleaning, we were so frustrated about it all, we just threw everything out.

Granted, most of what she had was worth nothing, but I wonder if there were a few buried treasures we missed.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Sason

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #119 on: January 30, 2018, 05:37:22 pm »
Hey, Cellar Dweller who doesn't live in a cellar anymore (while I do now!), Alma would agree with you that line-drying is the best way to finish the laundry!



I love the painting, Lee!

Do you know who the artist is?

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #120 on: January 30, 2018, 06:41:52 pm »
It's by Robin Cheers and it's called "Gusty Day". I should have given credit. Thanks for reminding me.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Sason

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #121 on: February 01, 2018, 06:59:27 pm »
Thanks for the info!

It's a lovely painting!

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: The Laundry Room
« Reply #122 on: February 02, 2018, 07:41:53 pm »
Can't hang the laundry outside today, it would freeze solid!


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!