Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 1516558 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2960 on: January 09, 2022, 01:46:56 pm »
I believe TNY also uses a diacritical mark (?--not sure if that's what it's called) in coordinate rather than a hyphen or no punctuation at all.

Quote
A diaeresis is a pair of dots that appear over a vowel to indicate that the vowel is pronounced separately from an adjacent vowel. For example, in English oo is generally pronounced as a single vowel sound, usually either the /u/ sound in boot or the /ʊ/ in book. The New Yorker puts a diaeresis over the repeated vowel in words like cooperate to show that those two o?s are pronounced as two distinct vowels. This also applies to other words with repeated vowels like reelect.
https://www.arrantpedantry.com/2020/03/24/umlauts-diaereses-and-the-new-yorker/

But that's just fussy punctuation, I think, not the same as letting writers use British English. Which actually wouldn't be a terrible idea, especially if the writer's Britishness is relevant to the piece.

But then what? Would they let Black writers write in an Ebonics voice if that comes naturally? Might not be a bad idea either.

Not expecting it in TNY, but I wouldn't be surprised if there are hipster-y magazines that do that.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2961 on: January 09, 2022, 03:04:17 pm »
But that's just fussy punctuation.

I like that characterization.  :D

BTW, did you read the article about that celebrity chef? She was quoted using fuck, shit, and bitch all in one sentence.  :laugh:
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2962 on: January 10, 2022, 09:40:38 pm »
I highly recommend the article about Dan Bongino in the Jan. 3 & 10 issue. Yes, it's a duty article, and it's hard going, but I think this is a duty everyone should undertake. Evan Osnos makes a very good point: "Spend several months immersed in American talk radio and you'll come away with the sense that the violence of January 6th was not the end of something but the beginning." I also get the impression Osnos thinks it's foolish for liberals to wring their hands over Facebook and TikTok when they should be paying attention to and being be concerned about what's going on in the world of extreme-right-wing talk radio.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2963 on: January 18, 2022, 03:12:15 pm »
To my own surprise, I'm actually caught up on my magazines. I'm reading the Jan. 17 issue now.

Partly at least, this is because I simply stopped reading everything, particularly anything that had to do with art, the performing arts, theatre, and movies.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2964 on: January 18, 2022, 10:58:36 pm »
In an article today I saw the word "focussed." Do they use archaic/non-American spellings just to be obstinate and quirky? Would Mr. Shawn roll in his grave if they spelled it with one S, yet they're OK with "fuck" now?



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2965 on: January 21, 2022, 12:01:09 am »
On my blog I wrote an entry concerning the Jan. 17 profile of Hanya Yanagihara. Didn't seem appropriate to make the comment here.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2966 on: January 21, 2022, 06:08:52 pm »
The first thing I read in the Jan. 24th issue is the review of the original and new translation of the book Bambi: A Life in the Woods and of the Disney movie, by Kathryn Schulz. Yes, I still feel reverberations of the trauma I experienced watching the movie as a child. I didn't really understand it when his mother died because I had never seen a gun before (Except for Elmer Fudd's but he never had a chance against the wascally Bugs). But I did feel terror when the fire raged through the forest. And I wondered at the ending: why was Bambi, like his father, regarding the family from a distance and not going to them? Shulz explains it all.

Walt Disney shaped my and countless baby boomers' entire world. Would life be totally different if he had gone into some other line of work? I wonder...
"chewing gum and duct tape"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2967 on: January 22, 2022, 09:38:24 pm »
The first thing I read in the Jan. 24th issue is the review of the original and new translation of the book Bambi: A Life in the Woods and of the Disney movie, by Kathryn Schulz. Yes, I still feel reverberations of the trauma I experienced watching the movie as a child. I didn't really understand it when his mother died because I had never seen a gun before (Except for Elmer Fudd's but he never had a chance against the wascally Bugs). But I did feel terror when the fire raged through the forest. And I wondered at the ending: why was Bambi, like his father, regarding the family from a distance and not going to them? Shulz explains it all.

Walt Disney shaped my and countless baby boomers' entire world. Would life be totally different if he had gone into some other line of work? I wonder...

I read that article, too, though it reverberated less for me because I've never seen Bambi. Still, as I read, I kept thinking, Wouldn't it be awfully traumatic for a small child, that part about losing his mother? It would have been for me.

Sounds like bookends to me, the father at the beginning and Bambi at the end.

I wonder how you pronounce the name in German?
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2968 on: January 22, 2022, 09:41:40 pm »
I haven't yet read the article about Thomas Mann, but I intend to. I was browsing through it and came across a quote from Mann that if Fascism ever came to America, it would be in the name of Freedom.

There's a prophecy for you.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2969 on: February 12, 2022, 03:35:32 pm »
I should keep John McPhee's article in the Feb. 7 issue for where he writes about scotches and bourbons.

Distilleries get bought and sold by different companies, even though they keep their names (brand identification). Maker's Mark, however, is still made by Maker's Mark in Loretto, Kentucky--at least, that's what it says on the bottle I have in my liquor cupboard.

Pappy Van Winkle's is Walt Longmire's preferred bourbon.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.