Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 489045 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #720 on: November 14, 2013, 03:44:47 pm »
What is the most unusual thing you ever ate? For me, I guess it would be sea urchin. It was wonderful, but I wouldn't eat it often. In Scotland I ate (and loved) haggis and in Nepal I ate yak meat. That was pretty bland. There are more off-putting dishes here in America, IMHO. Okra! Fried pickles! In fact, anything fried kind of turns my stomach.

I usually like to try anything unusual I have the opportunity to eat. So ostrich, rattlesnake, alligator, nutria, raw oysters, crawfish, fried pig's tail (like if bacon were shaped like a pig's tail), all the stuff they put in sushi. Plenty of okra. And fried pickles, at a restaurant in Wyoming in the company of Brokies!  :D

Someone recently circulated a list of 100 "unusual" foods on Facebook (most but not not all them unusual to the average American) and I scored 71.

I added a couple to my list, Lee, at that restaurant in Denver that possessed the city's first liquor license and where the walls are covered with animal heads. That dinner was kind of a disaster, though -- my younger son was a vegetarian at the time, and a restaurant covered literally floor to ceiling in multiple rooms with severed animal heads is not the ideal setting.


Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #721 on: November 16, 2013, 02:01:40 pm »

I added a couple to my list, Lee, at that restaurant in Denver that possessed the city's first liquor license and where the walls are covered with animal heads. That dinner was kind of a disaster, though -- my younger son was a vegetarian at the time, and a restaurant covered literally floor to ceiling in multiple rooms with severed animal heads is not the ideal setting.

Oh, that would be the Buckhorn Exchange. What did you have there? The BBQer's went there in 2007 before departing Denver for Estes Park. I didn't go because I was picking up Chrissi at the airport. However, I did go back there with Luigi a year or so later and we had a rattlesnake appetizer. And there's a fellow Wyoming-loving friend who I meet there in the upstairs bar for a drink every once in a while.

I can see how your vegetarian son would have been freaked out by the animal heads. There are getting to be some nice vegetarian restaurants in Denver now. And many of the regular restaurants are adding vegetarian dishes. When I am out with my vegetarian friends I always follow their dietary preferences but, secretly, I miss fish and seafood when I can't order it...meat, not so much.
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #722 on: November 16, 2013, 06:25:47 pm »
I could understand vegetarianism, although I am not one. But I could never understand veganism until recently. Then I realized that we have an abundance of milk and other dairy products because the calf is taken away from its mother shortly after it is born. That seems cruel, maybe even more cruel than eating meat. I still drink milk and eat cheese but I am careful not to waste it. Milk is so cheap that we oftentimes just grab a gallon of it and then end up pouring half down the drain at the end of a week.
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline milomorris

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #723 on: November 16, 2013, 07:05:13 pm »
Milk is so cheap that we oftentimes just grab a gallon of it and then end up pouring half down the drain at the end of a week.

We were having that issue too. Then we started down-sizing. We finally figured out about 3 years ago that 1 quart would get used regularly before any of it spoiled.
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #724 on: November 16, 2013, 08:22:00 pm »
We were having that issue too. Then we started down-sizing. We finally figured out about 3 years ago that 1 quart would get used regularly before any of it spoiled.

I actually never buy milk unless I know people are coming over and want it for coffee.  I don't drink coffee, and almost never use milk.  If I buy it I end up wasting it, so better not to have it at all.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #725 on: November 17, 2013, 04:21:41 am »
We were having that issue too. Then we started down-sizing. We finally figured out about 3 years ago that 1 quart would get used regularly before any of it spoiled.


Good thinking. "Just grab a gallon" - that's something one can't do over here. We don't sell beverages in gallons, but in liter packages (tetra paks for non-carbonated beverages, bottles for carbonated). One liter is almost exactly a quart. Even if we could buy a gallon of milk, nobody could put it into their fridge. Not enough space in there for huge gallon packages. :laugh:
That's actually something I started wondering about in the 90ies, watching the TV show Roseanne. They always took those huge plastic containers out of the fridge. Who can even empty such a big container before the contents get spoiled?

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #726 on: November 17, 2013, 10:12:22 am »
Sometimes I think I was born on the wrong continent. I agree with you that those gallon jugs are awful. They're even a pain when empty. Finally the recyclers now accept them. But they take up so much room! My daughter buys milk at Costco, which comes in a box of two gallon jugs. Even that doesn't last a week at her house! She does make yogurt and buttermilk. She also buys cream by the quart and makes sour cream and cheese.

Meat is another matter. I'm trying to clean out the fridge in preparation for moving. That means coping with big hunks of meat that have been chilling in there since forever. Fortunately, EDelMar and OCD have scheduled a movie night tonight. I know I can count on them to eat bunches of this meat!

May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #727 on: November 17, 2013, 11:17:13 am »
I don't drink coffee


What? Chuck, you're not from Texas!  8)


Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #728 on: November 17, 2013, 11:49:29 am »
Oh, that would be the Buckhorn Exchange. What did you have there? The BBQer's went there in 2007 before departing Denver for Estes Park. I didn't go because I was picking up Chrissi at the airport. However, I did go back there with Luigi a year or so later and we had a rattlesnake appetizer.

I think we had the rattlesnake, too. And somebody had ostrich, and somebody I'm sure had buffalo, and I can't remember what all else.

Quote
I can see how your vegetarian son would have been freaked out by the animal heads. 


He's no longer a vegetarian. It only lasted a couple of years, but man while he did it he was intense. I had to make two batches of spaghetti sauce, and if the spoon from the meat one went into the non-meat one, the non-meat one was ruined. He wouldn't sit on a leather chair. He made himself throw up when he found he had eaten Ceasar salad dressing containing anchovy paste. Couldn't eat lots of pies and most Hotess items because they contain lard. No gelatin-containing candy. Had to have a non-leather baseball glove.

Then one day he started right back eating meat.

Quote
There are getting to be some nice vegetarian restaurants in Denver now. And many of the regular restaurants are adding vegetarian dishes. When I am out with my vegetarian friends I always follow their dietary preferences but, secretly, I miss fish and seafood when I can't order it...meat, not so much.

I have to eat a lot of animal products because I avoid carbs. But I'm always happy to eat a vegetarian meal here and there. I find these days that most nice restaurants have at least one vegetarian dish on the menu. During Jack's vegetarian days he at some really delicious meals in restaurants. Sometimes I would join him. My then-husband and son always had to have meat.


But I could never understand veganism until recently. Then I realized that we have an abundance of milk and other dairy products because the calf is taken away from its mother shortly after it is born. That seems cruel, maybe even more cruel than eating meat.

It gets a lot crueler than that in the world of factory farming. Take the chickens who spend their entire lives in wire cages the size of shoeboxes, stacked by the thousands in big dark warehouses, their entire existence devoted to being egg-laying machines. And a "cage free" label usually just means they're packed by the thousands into big dark warehouses but without the wire cages.

I'm less familiar with the lives of cows but I'm sure all factory farmed animals endure various forms of hell. If you want to understand more about the moral argument for veganism, I highly recommend Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals.

So here's a thought I had last night. I went with some friends to see 12 Years a Slave, and as always with a movie like that, you have to examine your conscience -- what would I have done if I'd lived in those times? And of course I always like to think I would have been a progressive abolistionist and not a slaveholder (and by the way, this exercise doesn't just apply to white Americans whose ancestors were here back then -- unless you want to argue that different ethnic groups have different moral capabilities, then it applies to everybody). But of course you can never know -- if I'd grown up as a white person in rural Louisiana in the 19th century, I'd be highly unusual if I even thought to object to slavery. Even if I weren't entirely comfortable with it (as clearly some of the white characters aren't in the movie), I wouldn't necessarily do anything about it.

Now I'm someone who thinks that factory farming is evil, but I continue to eat eggs, dairy and meat. I do always grab the "cage free" eggs (figuring that's better than the alternative) and buy eggs and meat from a small farm at the farmer's market whenever I go, and look for sausage in the grocery story from this one company that even JSF kind of approved of because they raise their pigs so humanely. But those are pretty lame actions compared to the larger principle.

To be very clear, I'm not equating the lives of humans and animals, or saying factory farming is just as bad as slavery or anything like that. I'm just wondering: how far are average people (myself, for example) willing to go on behalf of their moral beliefs? Not that far, usually.




Offline CellarDweller

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #729 on: November 17, 2013, 11:54:55 am »
What? Chuck, you're not from Texas!  8)


Nope!  Jersey through and through!   I do enjoy a mug of hot chocolate on occasion.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!