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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: In the New Yorker... 0 Residents and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 232834 times)
Jeff Wrangler
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« Reply #1760 on: August 01, 2017, 09:06:30 am »

Thanks to Katherine, I read it on line. One's enough. ...
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« Reply #1761 on: August 01, 2017, 10:47:45 am »

I don't think they ever intended to print it. The news was too hot to hold for the next issue, and Lizza's story got linked and quoted so widely that there's no point in printing it now anyway.

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« Reply #1762 on: August 11, 2017, 01:28:01 pm »

OMG, I think I won't be able to stop laughing all afternoon. I almost never read the single-page humor pieces, but I read Bruce McCall's about Canada (July 31), and I can't stop laughing over this line:

"That hunky young Canadian Prime Minister makes Trump look like a used-car salesman."

 laugh  laugh  laugh

That's exactly what he looks like. And I'd never buy a car from him.  Grin
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« Reply #1763 on: August 12, 2017, 12:40:09 pm »

Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto is easy on the eyes, too.



So grotesque-looking Trump is bracketed by handsome leaders. The funny thing is, I don't know how much Trump thinks about that. I think he assumes that as long as his wife is beautiful, his own looks don't matter. And yet, he's vain enough to keep that hair or whatever it is and wear orange makeup. Even though people ridicule both.

In any case, the North American leader looks balance was pretty close when Obama was president.



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« Reply #1764 on: August 12, 2017, 02:36:37 pm »

Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto is easy on the eyes, too.


Oh! I don't think I've seen a picture of him before. But, yeah, real easy on the eyes. On facial features, I'd pick him over Justin Trudeau, if I had to--or could.  Roll Eyes  But I've always had a thing for Hispanic men. ...

Quote
So grotesque-looking Trump is bracketed by handsome leaders. The funny thing is, I don't know how much Trump thinks about that. I think he assumes that as long as his wife is beautiful, his own looks don't matter. And yet, he's vain enough to keep that hair or whatever it is and wear orange makeup. Even though people ridicule both.

He's so vain Carly Simon could write a song about him. ...

Quote
In any case, the North American leader looks balance was pretty close when Obama was president.

I would agree with that.  Smiley
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« Reply #1765 on: August 12, 2017, 05:08:02 pm »

Oh! I don't think I've seen a picture of him before. But, yeah, real easy on the eyes. On facial features, I'd pick him over Justin Trudeau, if I had to--or could.  Roll Eyes  But I've always had a thing for Hispanic men. ...

Good, because I'd go for Justin. So we won't have to fight!  Smiley

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He's so vain Carly Simon could write a song about him. ...

He's so vain he makes Mick Jagger and Warren Beatty, among the speculative subjects of that song, look like ... [insert name of some especially low key, modest, self-effacing celebrity, because I can't think of one ... Bill Pohlad?].



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« Reply #1766 on: August 21, 2017, 02:13:16 pm »

In the Aug. 21 issue the Talk of the Town includes a small piece on Hampton Fancher, who is now the subject of a documentary. Probably the most notable thing about him is that he wrote the "script that became the bones of 'Blade Runner,' the dystopian Ridley Scott film."

Before he became a full-time writer, Fancher was an actor, and that me feel a peculiar connection to him as I read this short piece. A few years ago, when I was visiting my dad, I watched an episode of my favorite childhood TV show Daniel Boone on one of the nostalgia channels. This episode included a tall, lean young man with what I thought was a head of beautiful, thick brown hair, playing a greenhorn Continental Army officer. So, sure, this episode was maybe 40 years old, but I was intrigued to know who this attractive young man was, so I watched the credits and later did some research: Hampton Fancher.

I remember checking and learning that he did another Boone episode, and apparently he appeared on many other TV shows of that era, like Bonanza and Adam-12,  though he never became a star. I mentioned his hair in particular because the article claims his hair contributed to his not becoming a leading man.  Huh?

He once was Terri Garr's boyfriend.
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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #1767 on: August 21, 2017, 03:52:54 pm »

In the Aug. 21 issue the Talk of the Town includes a small piece on Hampton Fancher, who is now the subject of a documentary. Probably the most notable thing about him is that he wrote the "script that became the bones of 'Blade Runner,' the dystopian Ridley Scott film."

Before he became a full-time writer, Fancher was an actor, and that me feel a peculiar connection to him as I read this short piece. A few years ago, when I was visiting my dad, I watched an episode of my favorite childhood TV show Daniel Boone on one of the nostalgia channels. This episode included a tall, lean young man with what I thought was a head of beautiful, thick brown hair, playing a greenhorn Continental Army officer. So, sure, this episode was maybe 40 years old, but I was intrigued to know who this attractive young man was, so I watched the credits and later did some research: Hampton Fancher.

I remember checking and learning that he did another Boone episode, and apparently he appeared on many other TV shows of that era, like Bonanza and Adam-12,  though he never became a star. I mentioned his hair in particular because the article claims his hair contributed to his not becoming a leading man.  Huh?

He once was Terri Garr's boyfriend.



Not ugly.....




Vintage photo of American actress
Sue Lyon and her first husband
American actor Hampton Fancher.





Actors  Christina Sinatra (R) and Hampton Fancher  (C) on set of TV production
Romeo & Juliet 70  as director Michael Pfleghar (L) stands nearby.









http://www.indiewire.com/2017/07/escapes-review-hampton-fancher-michael-almereyda-blade-runner-1201860278/

Born in 1938 and an undefinable survivor ever since, Fancher choreographed striptease routines for his sister when he was 10, he snuck about a ship to Spain when he was 15, where he became a flamenco dancer before sailing back to the States with Marlon Brando and Salvador Dali. He started working as a two-bit television actor, though he really only liked the job for the access it gave him to a constellation of beautiful starlets; he married Sue Lyons shortly after she shot “Lolita,” and he turned her into a Lolita of his own. He dodged death, became friends with the guy from “Flipper,” and seduced Barbara Hershey away from David Carradine. And then, as if by accident, he wrote the first draft of a movie that eventually came to be called “Blade Runner.”




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hampton_Fancher

Fancher was born to a Mexican/Danish mother[1] and an American father, a physician, in East Los Angeles, California, USA.[2] At 15, he ran away to Spain to become a flamenco dancer and renamed himself "Mario Montejo". He was married briefly to Sue Lyon of Lolita fame.[3]

In 1959, Fancher appeared in the episode "Misfits" of the ABC western television series, The Rebel. In the storyline, Fancher used the name "Bull" with Malcolm Cassell as Billy the Kid and Hal Stalmaster as "Skinny" plot to rob a bank so that they can live thereafter without working. The "Misfits" enlist the help of The Rebel (Nick Adams) in carrying out their doomed scheme.[4]

Fancher then played Deputy Lon Gillis in seven episodes of the ABC western, Black Saddle, with Peter Breck. He guest starred on other westerns, Have Gun, Will Travel, Tate, Stagecoach West, Outlaws, Maverick, Lawman, Temple Houston, Cheyenne (1961 episode "Incident at Dawson Flats"), and also Bonanza (1966 episode "A Dollar's Worth of Trouble").

Fancher appeared in two Troy Donahue films: 1961's Parrish and 1962's Rome Adventure and was cast as Larry Wilson in the 1963 episode "Little Richard" of the CBS anthology series, GE True, hosted by Jack Webb.[5] In 1965, he played the role of Hamp Fisher (a name very similar to his own), in the Perry Mason episode "The Case of the Silent Six."

After initially failing to convince Philip K. Dick to option Dick's 1968 science fiction novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? in 1975, Fancher sent his friend Brian Kelly, a prospective film producer. Dick agreed, and Fancher was brought on to write a screenplay before Kelly enlisted the support of producer Michael Deeley.[6] This made Fancher the executive producer, which led to disagreements with the eventual director Ridley Scott who then brought in David Peoples to continue reworking the script, ultimately filmed and released as Blade Runner (1982).[7]










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Jeff Wrangler
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« Reply #1768 on: August 21, 2017, 04:23:38 pm »

Not bad at all, which is why I "tracked him down" after the Boone episode--which, apparently, never gets mentioned.

I'll have to see if I can track down the episode.

ETA: The episode I saw when I was visiting my dad was called "The Desperate Raid" and aired Nov. 16, 1967.

A short while ago I checked out some Google images and saw pics of him dressed, I thought, like a bull fighter. That must have been his flamenco period.
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« Reply #1769 on: August 21, 2017, 05:03:07 pm »

Not bad at all, which is why I "tracked him down" after the Boone episode--which, apparently, never gets mentioned.

I'll have to see if I can track down the episode.

ETA: The episode I saw when I was visiting my dad was called "The Desperate Raid" and aired Nov. 16, 1967. The other episode was called "Fort West Point" and aired March 23, 1967.

A short while ago I checked out some Google images and saw pics of him dressed, I thought, like a bull fighter. That must have been his flamenco period.
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"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens
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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: In the New Yorker... « previous next »
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