Author Topic: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?  (Read 4512 times)

Offline Mandy21

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2010, 06:51:15 pm »
I always thought he was telling the truth in this scene, especially because he says he'll be back that very night by telling her what to bring home for their dinner.

Also thought that it was a pivotal scene in the showdown of looks they give each other.  Reminded me of how dog owners are sometimes taught to stare down a dog that they're training, and never (as the human) to blink first.  If the dog blinks first, he's conceding that you're the stronger.  In this case, Ennis's glare wins over Alma's, and so she backs down.  But she is publicly humiliated and mortified, and I think this is the beginning of the end of their marriage.
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Offline Luvlylittlewing

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2010, 09:19:48 pm »
I always thought he was telling the truth in this scene, especially because he says he'll be back that very night by telling her what to bring home for their dinner.

Good point!  :)

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2010, 09:49:26 pm »
Just one of many scenes that cements the fact that Ennis is stuck. Makes it so much sadder thinking about that sweet life he could have had. How difficult and tormenting the situation was for him. It also shows that Ennis knows his responsibility is providing for those kids and Alma. Later, when he had the chance, he just couldn't do it.

Brad


Offline serious crayons

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2010, 10:07:08 am »
It seems to me that Tom is misremembering the scene as it appears in the movie. Ennis couldn't possibly be secretly planning to meet up with Jack, because he and Jack haven't reunited yet.

However, I think I remember a discussion of this scene, either here or at IMDb, where we either had reason to believe or were just speculating that this scene was initially intended to appear later in the movie, where it COULD be about Ennis lying to get together with Jack. Even then it would be a little weird, if he's expecting to be home for dinner.

If that's what the scene was originally about, it's strange that they included it after all but in a different place. It doesn't seem very pivotal, and it's always made me a little uncomfortable because of the way Ennis mispronounces "girls."

It's interesting to see the range of reactions here, from feeling that it shows Alma being publicly humiliated, to feeling that it shows Ennis being in a tormenting situation. I just see it as the sort of conflict that most married couples get into from time to time.

Yes, Ennis feels that Alma's job is less important than his. Or at least, it's more urgent that he go to it immediately. And he very well could be right, judging from their responses -- Ennis seems stressed about getting there, and he obviously can't take the girls with him, whereas Alma has a sister and an accommodating boss and is able to take the kids. More may be at stake with Ennis' job -- it may pay better, and be more essential to supporting the family.

The other important aspect of this scene is Alma Jr.'s line, "I need crayons." As usual, so much is contained in a seemingly throwaway line! It's a metaphor for the whole movie.




Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2010, 03:22:27 pm »
However, I think I remember a discussion of this scene, either here or at IMDb, where we either had reason to believe or were just speculating that this scene was initially intended to appear later in the movie, where it COULD be about Ennis lying to get together with Jack. Even then it would be a little weird, if he's expecting to be home for dinner.

I think I remember that, too.

Quote
If that's what the scene was originally about, it's strange that they included it after all but in a different place. It doesn't seem very pivotal, and it's always made me a little uncomfortable because of the way Ennis mispronounces "girls."

Of course, then there would have had to be another scene to introduce Monroe.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2010, 03:40:29 pm »

However, I think I remember a discussion of this scene, either here or at IMDb, where we either had reason to believe or were just speculating that this scene was initially intended to appear later in the movie, where it COULD be about Ennis lying to get together with Jack.



I feel sure we talked about it once upon a time.

I love all the points everyone has brought up in this thread.  It feels like everyone is right, even the views that may be in conflict with each other.  What makes this a great movie.

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2010, 03:41:17 pm »
And of course Ennis tells a number of boldfaced lies.

Offline Sason

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2010, 04:13:02 pm »

If that's what the scene was originally about, it's strange that they included it after all but in a different place. It doesn't seem very pivotal, and it's always made me a little uncomfortable because of the way Ennis mispronounces "girls."


Does he?

In what way does he mispronounce it?

Maybe it's something all native English speakers will hear immediately and always knew, but this is the first I heard of it.

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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2010, 08:40:24 pm »
Does he?

In what way does he mispronounce it?

Maybe it's something all native English speakers will hear immediately and always knew, but this is the first I heard of it.


Sonja, for some weird reason, in that scene, Heath sounds very Australian in spots, and the word "girls" is the strongest example.  To me, it's so strong that I am surprised they left it in the movie.  It doesn't fit with his mostly impeccable accent in the rest of the film.


Offline serious crayons

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Re: Was Ennis telling a "boldfaced lie"?
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2010, 09:42:14 pm »
To me, it's so strong that I am surprised they left it in the movie.

Me too. It doesn't seem like it would have been that difficult to re-record the voice for that line, without even touching the rest of the scene. I think I've seen Brokies say that low-budget indies have to cut corners where they can, but given the care lavished on making the rest of the movie authentic it doesn't seem like this would be that big a deal.

Does he?

In what way does he mispronounce it?

Not sure how well this will translate, but here goes: What Heath says in that scene might be spelled "guhls" or "gihls" or even "gulls" in an American accent. But what a Wyoming accent would sound and be spelled like is more like "grrrls" or "garhls" with a harder R. Does that make sense?

Elle, I'm not sure I've noticed that many other spots where Heath seems noticeably Australian. Overall, he did master the American accent really well. That's why, for me, this one spot is so jarring. I can see how it would happen -- it would be tough to keep up an impeccable non-native accent at all times, and many actors attempting different English-language dialects, even including Americans doing other American regions, are MUCH less successful -- but I wish they'd have fixed it.

To add further complication, Heath's accent never sounded to me like a typical Australian accent (at least, the way I think of one) -- it always sounded sort of British. I believe either Sue or Kerry enlightened me at some point that his accent isn't necessarily typical Australian, but is a reflection of his region and background.