Author Topic: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012  (Read 9365 times)

Offline RouxB

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2012, 12:41:02 am »
I like Tobey too. Elle and I saw him at a panel discussion of Brothers. I don't think he and Jake meshed well...

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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2012, 01:02:12 am »




I like Tobey too. Elle and I saw him at a panel discussion of Brothers. I don't think he and Jake meshed well...




Hmmmmmm.





[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKHRCrQ2dtw[/youtube]


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Offline RouxB

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2012, 01:16:04 am »
The implication was that there were some conflicts

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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2012, 11:00:28 am »
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/amazing-spider-man-film-review-340662?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+thr%2Fnews+%28The+Hollywood+Reporter+-+Top+Stories%29





The Amazing Spider-Man: Film Review
Marc Webb's adaptation features Andrew Garfield as the webslinger
hero and Emma Stone as his love interest.


The Bottom Line:
This satisfying reboot slings a darker Spidey, a stronger
romance and a welcome slew of tongue-in-cheek humor.


by Jordan Mintzer
8:55 AM PDT 6/21/2012





The Amazing Spiderman: Peter Parker uses those spider-like powers on a subway car. While two weeks of
the 90-day shoot took place in New York City, the majority of filming occured in and around Los Angeles.



Leaping back onto the screen with a new cast, crew, costume and a whole new array of daddy issues, The Amazing Spider-Man  reboots the top-grossing Marvel franchise to altogether satisfying results.

Directed with emotional depth and plenty of comedic touches by Marc Webb (no pun intended), this somewhat darker depiction of your friendly neighborhood superhero inserts a touching portrait of adolescent angst into an otherwise predictable dose of CGI-fueled action, with stars Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone breathing new life into Stan Lee ’s 50-year-old creation. With a stateside release set on the cusp of an extended Independence Day holiday weekend, one hardly needs Spidey sense to predict huge worldwide returns for Sony in the first frame, though long-term theatrical might be hindered by the arrival of Warner’s The Dark Knight Rises  only two weeks later.
 
Just a decade after Sam Raimi’s original Spider-Man  propelled the wisecracking, web-slinging teenager into the box-office stratosphere, launching a (some would say endless) wave of comic book blockbusters where visual effects tend to stand in for veritable character development, it’s encouraging to see Webb and screenwriters James Vanderbilt, Alvin Sargent and Steve Kloves build up a convincing Peter Parker origin story here, combining tongue-in-cheek high jinks with a more downbeat tale of childhood trauma and attempting to answer those viewers wondering why they ever did a remake in the first place.
 
Opening with a flashback revealing how the young Parker (Max Charles) was suddenly and mysteriously entrusted to his Uncle Ben (Martin Sheen) and Aunt May (Sally Field) by his father (Campbell Scott) -- a renowned scientist whose studies in all things arachnid give hints of what’s to come -- the story quickly shifts to the present, where 17-year-old Peter (Garfield) is introduced as a brooding skater with bad posture and an eye for science, photography and his cute and clever classmate, Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone).
 
After suffering a few obligatory high school humiliations and striking out at least once with Gwen, Peter comes across his dad’s old research papers, sending him on a stealth mission to the laboratory of Dr. Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans), who runs the state-of-the-art biochemical facility at the all-powerful Oscorp. While snooping around the lab’s massive web-churning cylinder experiment -- one of several impressive set pieces by production designer J. Michael Rival (Iron Man ) -- Peter gets bitten by a genetically modified spider, and when he’s assaulted on the train ride home, his powers unexpectedly come out in full force.



Garfield as Peter Parker shows off his gymnastic/basketball
skills. In the film, he plays a bullied teen-turned-powerful
superhero side of the character.

 

Not unlike Raimi, Webb has much fun revealing Peter’s newfound capabilities early on, highlighted by the subway scene and a hilarious basketball sequence where he schools the class bully (Chris Zylka) with his superhuman court skills. But such playful moments soon give way to some more despair when Uncle Ben is abruptly -- and perhaps all too conveniently for plot purposes -- murdered by a fleeing street thug, sending Peter on a vigilante mission that eventually transforms him into the masked crusader, Spider-Man.
 
It came as somewhat of a surprise when commercials veteran Webb, with only one indie feature under his belt, was chosen to take the reins of the billion-dollar commodity, but it’s clear in the film’s first half what the maker of (500) Days of Summer  is bringing to the table here. Not unlike the forlorn greeting card writer of that catchy rom-com, Peter is depicted as a smart but downtrodden outsider who truly comes to life when he’s alongside his object of desire, and the scenes between Garfield and Stone have a witty and realistic edge to them that’s rare for a comic book romance.
 
Such moments, combined with Peter’s eternal quest for the father he never knew, help carry the narrative through the mandatory denouement of fights, chases, mutant transformations and a rather lengthy final showdown set – surprise! – at the top of a skyscraper, as if Marvel simply swapped out the Stark Enterprises sign of The Avengers  for the Oscorp one here. An earlier action scene on a traffic-jammed Williamsburg Bridge shows more inventiveness, even if the visual effects (headed up by Jerome Chen, Beowulf ) are top-notch, filled with POV shots of Spidey swinging down Fifth Avenue or in combat mode with his high-tech web shooters -- which, along with the more latex-heavy costume, reveal how our hero has been updated from previous installments. (The other update being that he relies a lot on his cell phone.)
 
While the two leads deliver the goods and manage to combine a frisky sense of first love with the movie’s gloomier arc, they are well-served by a terrific supporting cast, with Sheen as Peter’s tough-loving guardian angel, Denis Leary as Gwen’s overprotective policeman dad and Ifans as an increasingly mad scientist whose reptile leather fetish yields disastrous results.
 
The swooping score by James Horner blends well with the crime-fighter’s many leaps and bounds, while cinematographer John Schwartzman, shooting in 5K with the Red Epic, gets plenty of mileage out of the film’s various night sequences. Beyond a few brief flourishes, the 3D hardly feels necessary here, serving no other clear purpose than to sling a few additional dollars into Spidey’s web of worldwide ticket sales.
 


Opens: Tuesday, July 3 (Columbia Pictures)
 
Production companies: Columbia Pictures, Marvel Entertainment
 
Cast: Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Denis Leary, Martin Sheen, Sally Field, Irrfan Khan, Chris Zylka

Director: Marc Webb

Screenwriters: James Vanderbilt, Alvin Sargent, Steve Kloves, from a story by James Vanderbilt, based on the Marvel comic book by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko

Producers: Avi Arad, Laura Ziskin, Matt Tolmach

Executive producers: Stan Lee, Michael Grillo, Kevin Feige

Director of photography: John Schwartzman

Production designer: J. Michael Riva
 
Music: James Horner

Costume designer: Kym Barrett

Editors: Alan Edward Bell, Pietro Scalia

Visual effects: Sony Pictures Imageworks.

Visual effects supervisor: Jerome Chen

Special effects supervisor: John Frazier

3D special effects supervisor: Rob Engle

Stunt coordinators: Andy Armstrong, Vic Armstrong

PG-13 rating, 136 minutes
« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 04:54:06 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2012, 02:11:31 pm »
"Bottom line" indeed!!  ;)
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2012, 04:51:06 pm »
http://www.vulture.com/2012/06/movie-review-the-amazing-spider-man.html



The Amazing Spider-Man : 
Unnecessary Reboot Makes a Convincing Case for Itself
By David Edelstein
Today at 11:45 AM




Coming barely a decade after Sam Raimi’s first Spider-Man,  the “reboot” called The Amazing Spider-Man  is clearly unnecessary and ought to be shunned for all kinds of reasons — chiefly to deliver a shock to the system of Hollywood execs whose primary job is finding merchandisable “franchises” and studio “tentpoles.” But for all its under­lying cynicism, the new Spidey picture is pretty damn good. The lesson should not be that lazy multiplex viewers and Comic-Con fanatics will pay to see anything with ­Marvel’s name on it, but that first chapters — a.k.a. “origin stories” — are easier to make and more reliably fun. By the time part three of a blockbuster superhero saga rolls around, the lead actors have aged out of their roles and are impatient to prove they can carry “serious” (i.e., Oscar-bait) movies, while the filmmakers, their edges blunted by too much money and unable to think about complex, long-term story arcs the way TV creators can, flop about in misery, their brains grinding emptiness. Why not start the whole thing over with a younger, hungrier, less expensive crew?

I’m not making the case for a movie like The Amazing Spider-Man  — only saying it’s fresher than Raimi & Co.'s shambolic Spider-Man 3.  (No, it can’t touch Spider-Man 2,  the best of all the Marvel pictures.) The new Peter Parker is Andrew Garfield, the glowering dweeb from The Social Network,  and where Tobey Maguire was soft-faced and mild, examining his sudden, sticky excretions with an adolescent’s wonderment, Garfield is high-strung and angry — and those excretions don’t come naturally. (This Peter has to build his web-jets.) Because a primal trauma must kick-start every superhero career, we’ve seen little Peter lose his parents (Campbell Scott as his scientist dad, Embeth Davidtz as his mom) in the prologue, and high-school Peter beaten up by bullies. His powers emerge spasmodically, twisting him in knots, his body with a mind of its own. The problem with the first Spider-Man  was that whenever Maguire got into his suit, he transformed into a little video-game fellow swinging around an artificial cityscape, fluidity trumping realism. Director Marc Webb makes the flights more jagged, mixing up his angles and adding Spidey-eye views for the wheeee factor. At one point, Peter channels Ratso Rizzo: “I’m swingin’ here!” You don’t get that weightless, inhuman CGI vibe as powerfully.

Like many superhero pictures, The Amazing Spider-Man  has more self-­empowering messages than there are placards at a Maoist convention. A poster of Albert Einstein carries the banner, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Peter’s uncle (Martin Sheen, ever the voice of the liberal conscience) preaches moral responsibility — the social good taking precedence over freedom of choice. Politics-shmolitics: Americans now get most of their civic lessons from masked men in Spandex. A strikingly handsome Rhys Ifans plays the ­Jekyll/­Hyde figure, Dr. Curt Connors, once Peter’s father’s best friend. Having only one arm, he sits in his lab and stares longingly at lizards flitting around their aquaria, losing their tails and growing them back with aplomb. Reptiles are the master race, he concludes. Everyone should be turned into reptiles. His scheme doesn’t make much sense, but give it points for weirdness. The lizard metamorphoses mean there’s so much CGI that the artists’ and programmers’ names are scrolling long after you’ve exited the restroom and headed for home.

I’ve saved the best for last: The love interest played by that throaty redheaded (here blonde) darling Emma Stone, whose blue eyes radiate so much intelligence that any actor on whom she trains them in adoration becomes an instant movie star. Lucky Garfield, getting to play scenes like the one in which Peter tries to tell Stone’s Gwen Stacy what happened after a chemically mutated spider dropped down his shirt. “I’ve been bitten … ” he stammers. “So have I,” Stone says, sighing, and melting him with her gaze. CGI is superfluous.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Monika

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2012, 12:39:16 am »
from my fb

Last night I went to the midnight opening of "The Amazing Spider-Man". Wow - go and see it. Great acting (Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Martin Cheen, Sally Field, Dennis Leary) and above all - it had lots of heart. In comparison with the earlier Spiderman movies, this version is a little more gritty which gives the story a realistic touch. Perhaps its biggest virtue is that it contains way more Peter Parker scenes than scenes showing Spiderman hitting bad guys. This movie is not about the special effects (or as in Magic Mike - about gyrating hips) but about characters and telling a story. This Spiderman doesn´t take anything away from the earlier movies, but rather adds more layers to the Spiderman saga.
 

Offline Sophia

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2012, 01:41:39 am »
from my fb

Last night I went to the midnight opening of "The Amazing Spider-Man". Wow - go and see it. Great acting (Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Martin Cheen, Sally Field, Dennis Leary) and above all - it had lots of heart. In comparison with the earlier Spiderman movies, this version is a little more gritty which gives the story a realistic touch. Perhaps its biggest virtue is that it contains way more Peter Parker scenes than scenes showing Spiderman hitting bad guys. This movie is not about the special effects (or as in Magic Mike - about gyrating hips) but about characters and telling a story. This Spiderman doesn´t take anything away from the earlier movies, but rather adds more layers to the Spiderman saga.
 

Might just be the first thing I do on my summer break. Take a trip to the Cinemal. I´m sure I could enjoy a handsome Andrew Garfield.

Offline Luvlylittlewing

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Re: The Amazing Spider-Man (with Andrew Garfield), July 3 2012
« Reply #18 on: July 04, 2012, 02:14:10 pm »
I saw it last night with my daughter and nephew.  The Jack London Theater was as crowded as I've ever seen it, with most people there to see Medea.  Anyway, Spiderman was great!  He has always been my favorite super-hero, and I really like what I saw last night.  I'm a repeat movie goer (hey, I saw Brokeback 15 times during its run) and I may see Spiderman again.