Author Topic: Last January, world famous Toronto gay artist Steve Walker died at 50  (Read 27985 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://digitaljournal.com/blog/15281


World famous Toronto gay artist
Steve Walker dead at 50

By Michel F. Paré
Posted Feb 14, 2012 in Arts



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gEpTHJlJrtg[/youtube]



Internationally renowned Canadian artist Steve Walker passing was sudden and unexpected, at his home in Costa Rica on January 4, 2012. He died from a heart attack, but had no history of a heart condition. The family executor of the estate requested the announcement be delayed, to allow time for an accurate inventory of the artist's paintings to be made in his galleries in Canada and the United States as well as his studio in Costa Rica. (Source: James Lyman, Lyman-Eyer Gallery, Provincetown, MA)


Biography of Steve Walker




Born in Ottawa, Walker was 19 when he moved to Toronto to study theatre at university. Deeply affected by the impact HIV/AIDS had on the gay community, he gave up his goal of being an actor and started to paint.

Drawing was one of Steve Walker's earliest childhood memories. He recollected drawing pictures from about the age of three or four years old. Drawing came naturally to the Toronto artist, and his love of the art form continued into his adulthood. As a self taught artist, Walker only began painting after a trip to Europe when he was 25 years old. During the trip, he spent much of his time in Europe touring the great galleries and museums. In his words it was the first time he was exposed to great painting, and the first time he recognized the potential power of the art form. "I was moved by something that I was capable of doing," he said. His first paintings were done in a somewhat secretive way, as he had no intention of exhibiting or selling, and had no aspirations of becoming a professional artist.

Producing art about his life, and the lives of those around him, was as natural to Walker as his first childhood drawings. As a gay man, Walker was acutely aware that he was living during a period of history that was both the best of times and the worst of times. There was more freedom and acceptance for gay men and women, while at the same time AIDS had devastated the gay population. But Walker's paintings are not about gay people or homosexuality. He described his art as being about love, hate, pain, joy, touch, communication, beauty, loneliness, attraction, hope, despair, life and death. His art includes universal themes regardless of race, gender, socio-economic class, culture or sexual orientation. However, his work is unique because he conveys these themes through the subjects in his paintings - young gay men.

"Remove the gender of the painting's subjects and what we have is human relationships in general, and one's relationship to the world itself," he said. "As a homosexual, I have been moved, educated and inspired by works that deal with a heterosexual context. Why would I assume that a heterosexual would be incapable of appreciating work that speaks to common themes in life, as seen through my eyes as a gay man? If the heterosexual population is unable to do this, then the loss is theirs, not mine." If Walker were an abstract painter or a landscape artist, he said his sexual orientation wouldn't matter. But since his paintings are about gay life, his sexual orientation became more important than his cultural background, age, or nationality.

The focus of his paintings often depicted sadness and loneliness to reflect the reality that much of anyone's life is sad and lonely. Walker often portrayed people in relationships as separate entities because that is the way he viewed them. He also used a small and consistent palette of colors because he was comfortable with them and the colors provided the desired results. "Color is very powerful and a little can go a long way if used effectively," he said. "Some colors are very exciting to me, while others are quite offensive. Painting flesh is very exciting because of the huge variations possible within a very small color range." Walker's artworks are very large, always measuring 36" by 48". He created large paintings because he believed that a large image is more appealing than a smaller one. "Whether it's a television screen, cinema screen, or an image in a magazine, the size of the image connotes a degree of importance," he said. Walker said belonging to an oppressed minority group had been a driving force in creating his art. "Any minority wants and needs to find artistic voices that reflect their own personal situations, and, in doing so, validate and record their lives and cultures for themselves, and for the larger world," he said. Walker said he experienced many small rewards during the creative process. "After hours of painting, I stand back and look at something that wasn't there before -- a hand, face, or piece of fabric will exist where there was once a blank canvas," he said.

As an artist, Walker said it was exciting to be working at a point in history where there is an audience ready to appreciate and consume his creations. "It is very rare to find success as an artist in your lifetime," he said. "My work will be around long after me, but seeing it affect people, at the time that I am creating it, is very rewarding." In recent years, Steve Walker's work has been exhibited in galleries in Toronto, Montreal, Los Angeles, Fort Lauderdale, Key West and Provincetown. The gay community of North America has responded very positively to Walker's art. "I am very aware of the appreciation from a group of people who recognize the time, energy and talent devoted to a body of work that speaks specifically to them but at the same time exists in the larger world that we all live in."


Funeral Arrangements

Walker lived for years in a modest apartment at Wellesley and Jarvis St. in Toronto Ontario.

Steve is survived by his mother and father, Gloria and Gilbert Walker (Greely, Ontario), his brother Kevin Walker (Kingston, Ontario) and sister Marjorie Walker, Estate Trustee (Pembroke, Ontario). He is predeceased by his brother Bruce Walker. A funeral memorial will be held at Our Lady of the Visitation Parish, Ottawa, Ontario on February 25, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. It is anticipated that a memorial celebrating the life of Steve Walker will be held in Toronto at a date still to be determined. His family, friends and the international art world mourn the passing of this talented and beloved artist.

Walker once wrote: "I hope that in its silence, the body of my work has given a voice to my life, the lives of others, and in doing so, the dignity of all people."

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brsQlN_YDB4&feature=related[/youtube]


[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3xROEiK-RY&feature=related[/youtube]
.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://martingodin.blogspot.com/2012_03_01_archive.html


Saturday, March 24, 2012
Steve Walker, R.I.P.










































« Last Edit: May 19, 2012, 07:34:38 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=R7uPAD0SODA[/youtube]
Artwork by Steve Walker
Music - Song for Cello & Piano by Daniel Tobias





In Memoriam:
Steve Walker (1961-2012)

by Claude J. Summers
Posted on 02/12/12
Last updated on: 02/14/12


The death of acclaimed Canadian artist Steve Walker was announced on February 10, 2012 by James Lyman of the Lyman-Eyer Gallery in Provincetown. He died unexpectedly at his home in Costa Rica on January 4, 2012. He is survived by his mother and father and brother and sister. A funeral service is scheduled for February 25 in Ottawa, where he was born. A memorial service will be held later in Toronto, where he lived for many years.

Walker is responsible for some of the most famous images of gay male couples in contemporary popular culture. Executed in a photo realist style, his paintings of handsome men in emotionally charged situations owe something to the influence of Paul Cadmus, but the self-taught artist imbued them with his own distinctive romantic and often melancholy sensibility.

He described his work, which focuses almost exclusively on men together, as "a documentation, an interpretation, a crystallization of singular moments rendered in line, color, light, shadow, using a hundred brushes, a thousand colors, and a million brushstrokes. I strive to make people stop, if only a moment, think and actually feel something. My paintings contain as many questions as answers."

On his website, Steve Walker Artist, which contains a gallery of his images, he writes that "It simply never occurred to me to paint about themes in any other context than that of my own life as a person who happens to be gay. I had never had a problem relating to work created by heterosexuals in a heterosexual context. Why should I create paintings whose context was anything other than the truth of my life as a gay man?"

He also wrote, "I hope that in its silence, the body of my work has given a voice to my life, the lives of others, and in doing so, the dignity of all people."


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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I came home tonight to the news that my favorite artist, Steve Walker is no longer with us. 

His works inspired my hopes and dreams and helped me to overcome my fear of embracing and accepting myself for who I am.  I am thankful to have enjoyed his art and I am saddened to know that the special light that he shone on our world is dimmer and diminished by his absence.


 
Dear Clients,

It is with great sadness that as Works of Art Executor and Trustee of the Estate of Steve Walker, on behalf of his family, that I announce internationally renowned Canadian artist Steve Walker has passed away at the age of 50. The Lyman-Eyer Gallery, his family, friends and the international art world mourn the passing of the talented and beloved artist.

James Lyman
Lyman-Eyer Gallery
Provincetown, Massachusetts


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Offline Meryl

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What beautiful work.  Thanks for posting so much of it, John.   :-*
Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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What beautiful work.  Thanks for posting so much of it, John.   :-*




Thanks, Meryl.

The last video posted (with Song for Cello & Piano  by Daniel Tobias), I just lost it, and cried and cried. It made me think of Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings.



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNLtvAcQMIk[/youtube]



Steve Walker was an amazing artist. So sad.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Sason

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Thank you so much for all these posts of his work, John.

I don't think I've ever heard of him before. What a talented artist he was!

His pictures are indeed very beautiful and touching. Even though most of them depict two people together, to me they convey a sense of sadness, loneliness and melancholy.

The one that touched my heart the most, is the painting of the little boy with his doll.


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Offline Sason

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What a prolific artist he was!

With so much detail and realism, each painting must have taken quite some time to complete, and there are so many of them!

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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Thank you so much for all these posts of his work, John.

I don't think I've ever heard of him before. What a talented artist he was!

His pictures are indeed very beautiful and touching. Even though most of them depict two people together, to me they convey a sense of sadness, loneliness and melancholy.

The one that touched my heart the most, is the painting of the little boy with his doll.





Thanks, Sonja. I don't know if it is, but I rather think the little boy with his doll was meant to represent Walker himself.

I am probably over reaching, but I think (maybe ironically?) that Walker was also representing himself as the child in this  painting--




--is it a stretch to say that the boy is looking at the right-hand figure in the painting, the figure which is sad--or ashamed?


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Offline Sason

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Thanks, Sonja. I don't know if it is, but I rather think it is (at least) meant to represent Walker himself.


I probably am over reaching, but I think (maybe ironically?) that Walker was also representing himself as the child in this painting--






Oh, I didn't think of that!

I was thinking this is how he wishes his paintings would be received by the general public: like any painting in any gallery where any people would admire it.

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Offline Monika

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I really find his work beautiful and interesting. There is a stark realism about his paintings and they all strike me as very intimite.  They remind me about the line in Brokeback "...lets a panel of the dream slide forward."

I really would like to own a reproduction of the Bareback Mountain painting. It´s so understated - so Brokeback-ish.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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As a self taught artist, Walker only began painting after a trip to Europe when he was 25 years old. During the trip, he spent much of his time in Europe touring the great galleries and museums. In his words it was the first time he was exposed to great painting, and the first time he recognized the potential power of the art form. "I was moved by something that I was capable of doing," he said. His first paintings were done in a somewhat secretive way, as he had no intention of exhibiting or selling, and had no aspirations of becoming a professional artist.




This  is no stretch--you can see that the portrait here (from the back) is obviously himself  (better if you click to see the original in his gallery in his site)--








But this one is, maybe, just representational--




Drawing was one of Steve Walker's earliest childhood memories. He recollected drawing pictures from about the age of three or four years old.




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Oh, I didn't think of that!

I was thinking this is how he wishes his paintings would be received by the general public: like any painting in any gallery where any people would admire it.




--is it a stretch to say that the boy is looking at the right-hand figure in the painting, the figure which is sad--or ashamed?

--and that the 'father' is looking at the left-hand figure, which is trying to tentatively comfort--?

--and the 'mother' is--holding back----Comfort? Judgment?

As 'beautiful' as his paintings are, they are always--thoughtful. Questioning.

And, of course, almost always sad.


 
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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I really find his work beautiful and interesting. There is a stark realism about his paintings and they all strike me as very intimite.  They remind me about the line in Brokeback "...lets a panel of the dream slide forward."

I really would like to own a reproduction of the Bareback Mountain painting. It´s so understated - so Brokeback-ish.



Somehow I would have known you would like that one, Monika!  ;) :)




And you CAN buy the reproduction!   :D ;D  8)


http://stevewalkerartist.com/title_list.html


Quote
I am pleased to announce that Lyman-Eyer Gallery in Provincetown, Massachusetts, is now the sole
authorized producer and distributor of canvas reproductions of my paintings. Titles listed below in
white are available in both large and small formats, while those listed in blue are available in small
format only. Please click here to go to the Lyman-Eyer website for more information


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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://floridaagenda.com/2012/02/16/artist-steve-walker-passes-iconic-gay-artist-leaves-legacy-of-beauty/


ARTIST STEVE WALKER PASSES
Iconic Gay Artist
Leaves Legacy of Beauty

Posted on 16 February 2012





Internationally- renowned gay artist Steve Walker passed away unexpectedly at his home in Costa Rica on Jan. 4. The news of Walker’s death was released in a written statement by his estate last weekend. No cause of death was included in the written statement by representatives of his estate in Canada.
 
The work of the artist, who was only 50 when he died, is immediately recognizable by both seasoned art lovers and novices alike, and some of them were painted in South Florida. Most of the Ottawa-native’s work depicts men interacting with each other or with nature. Fort Lauderdale Beach, including the famed Wave Wall, served as the setting for several of his pieces.
 
Art consumed much of Walker’s earliest childhood: friends say that he started drawing at the age of three or four. A self-taught artist, Walker began painting after a trip to Europe when he was 25. He spent much of that time in Europe touring the great galleries and museums. It was the first time he was exposed to great painting, and the first time he recognized the potential power of the art form.
 
“I was moved by something that I was capable of doing,” Walker would later recall. His first paintings were done in a somewhat secretive way, as he had no intention of exhibiting or selling them and had no aspirations to becoming a professional artist.
 
The universal themes he depicted were done without respect to race, gender, socio-economic class, culture, or sexual orientation. However, his work is unique because he conveys these themes through the subjects in his paintings: young gay men.
 
“Remove the gender of the painting’s subjects and what we have is human relationships in general, and one’s relationship to the world itself,” Walker explained.
 
The focus of his paintings often depicted sadness and loneliness, to reflect the reality that much of life is sad and lonely. Walker often portrayed people in relationships as separate entities; that is the way he viewed them. He also used a small and consistent palette of colors with which he was comfortable and which became associated with his signature style.
 
“We started carrying his originals about one-and-a-half years ago,” said Tommy LaFashia, the owner of Gallery XO and himself an artist. Gallery XO is the exclusive Broward County gallery for Walker’s original artwork.
 
“About four weeks ago, we got a call at about seven one morning from the person who handles Steve’s artwork, telling me that he passed away. He has a sister who is acting as executor and is taking care of the estate and creating a foundation in Steve’s name. They want to make sure they preserve Steve’s legacy and keep his artwork out there.”
 
LaFashia explained that the estate initially wanted to keep Walker’s death secret until arrangements could be made, and an inventory of his work taken.
 
“We have four original works at the gallery,” said LaFashia. “We were told by the estate they are not to be sold until [the estate] gets everything together and they can talk to all the galleries. The original artwork will be available at some point, but I’m not sure when that will be.”
 
Walker’s original pieces at Gallery XO are titled “Platano y Pipa,” “Sculpture Series No. 1,” “Two Umbrellas,” and “Vintage Twilight.”
 
LaFashia said that he expects the estate to raise the prices on Walker’s artwork, and that the original works will carry a premium price.
 
Walker is survived by his parents, Gloria and Gilbert Walker, his brother, Kevin, and sister, Marjorie.  Another brother, Bruce, predeceased him.


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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://gerryburniebooks.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/bits-and-pieces-2/





Bits and pieces
Steve Walker
by Gerry B
Posted 12/02/2012



An internationally acclaimed  and prolific Canadian artist passed away January 4th, 2012, Steve Walker, but I have yet to see a single word about his passing in any Canadian media.
 
I cannot help but compare this neglect to the coverage being given to the passing of Whitney Houston, who was a)  not Canadian, and b) hardly a poster girl for wholesome living.
 
It is this sort of oversight that frustrates me, BIG TIME. Canada has a wonderful history, a plethora of accomplishments and talent, but unless it’s foreign or multicultural we–and the world–seldom get to hear of it.
 
End of rant.

Until next time,
 
Gerry





http://gerryburniebooks.wordpress.com/2012/02/13/a-eulogy-for-steve-walker-artist-and-illustrator-1962-2012/


Bits and pieces
A eulogy for Steve Walker,
Artist and illustrator  (1961 – 2012)

by Gerry B
Posted 13/02/2012





Since the Canadian media has so far failed to recognize the passing of a renowned Canadian talent, I have taken it upon myself to write this eulogy for a man I didn’t know, but whom I admire greatly for the following reasons:

Although I did not know Steve Walker personally, or even professionally, I think I would have liked him.
 
In his biography he comes across as a shy, unassuming person–as most extraordinarily talented people do–for in his own words, “I have always been inclined to let my work speak for itself, believing that should I need to explain it, I have perhaps failed.”

He was born in Ottawa, Ontario, and although his artistic talent was recognized as early as the first grade, his primary ambition was to be an actor, i.e.:

 
“Despite my artistic talent I was determined to be an actor “when I grew up”. At the age of nineteen, I moved to Toronto, Canada to study theatre at university. Four years later I graduated from university, moved into my own apartment, and embarked on a career as an actor and, of course, waiter.”
 

It was about then that he discovered his sexual orientation, which seems to have been an evolutionary process as apposed to a revelation—a not uncommon occurrence.
 

“I remember feeling a strange sense of elation upon having survived childhood, a rural environment, education, and the knowledge that my sexual orientation, (which was never a mystery or problem to me personally), would forever cause some people who never met me and would never know me, to hate me and others like me.”
 

However all this was about to change in the 1970s when the term “A.I.D.S.” started to circulate around the gay community, not only in Toronto but around the world, and so he turned away from acting in an attempt to “find a cure for the hatred, fear, and ignorance that surrounded so many young men around the world as they lay in hospital beds and drew the last breaths of unfinished lives,” and so he began painting.
 
Never having painted before, he nonetheless taught himself and began creating paintings, not about gay or homosexual men, per se, but about the things all human beings share.
 

“Themes of love, attraction, hope, despair, loneliness, the beauty of sky, the perfection of a horizon, the power of a person touching another were given life on pieces of canvas. I created images that came from a place of truth. I tried to make sense of and give order to a world that seemed to know neither.
 
“It simply never occurred to me to paint about themes in any other context than that of my own life as a person who happens to be gay. I had never had a problem relating to work created by heterosexuals in a heterosexual context. Why should I create paintings whose context was anything other than the truth of my life as a gay man?”





 
From there he began to display his works in gay restaurants and bars around Toronto—I remember very distinctly seeing some of these at the “Les Cavaliers” club on Church Street (now the “Gay Village”—and in a short while he was exhibiting and selling his work in high end mainstream galleries throughout North America, and reproductions of his work throughout the world.
 
An epilogue in his own words,
 

“I see my work as a documentation, an interpretation, a crystallization of singular moments rendered in line, color, light, shadow, using a hundred brushes, a thousand colors, and a million brushstrokes. I strive to make people stop, if only a moment, think and actually feel something. My paintings contain as many questions as answers.
 
“I hope that in its’silence, the body of my work has given a voice to my life, the lives of others, and in doing so, the dignity of all people.”


 
***
 
Requiestat in pace, Steve Walker. I mourn your passing as a gay man; as an admirer of great talent; as a Canadian; and as a person.










"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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“I remember feeling a strange sense of elation upon having survived childhood, a rural environment, education, and the knowledge that my sexual orientation, (which was never a mystery or problem to me personally), would forever cause some people who never met me and would never know me, to hate me and others like me.”


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
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Offline Sason

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The painting of the little boy is awesome.

He actually resembles my brother quite a lot when he was little.

Not the mouth, but eyes, hair, cheeks, the shape of his face.

My brother didn't/doesn't usually look that sad, though.

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline southendmd

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Thank you, John, for this.  I have known about his work for years and have always admired it.  I hadn't heard that he died.  The two paintings of two men tying ties always struck me as interesting--simple, intimate, domestic and yet very sexy.  I love the way he paints hands--very David-like, I think. 

I put the Brokeback homage painting on the banner.  I had never seen that one; it was done in 2007, our "year of heaven" as Lee puts it. 

I happen to be just a few blocks away from the Lyman-Eyer Gallery here in Ptown--I think I'll go visit today.


Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Thank you, John, for this.  I have known about his work for years and have always admired it.  I hadn't heard that he died.  The two paintings of two men tying ties always struck me as interesting--simple, intimate, domestic and yet very sexy.  I love the way he paints hands--very David-like, I think. 

I put the Brokeback homage painting on the banner.  I had never seen that one; it was done in 2007, our "year of heaven" as Lee puts it. 

I happen to be just a few blocks away from the Lyman-Eyer Gallery here in Ptown--I think I'll go visit today.



Thanks, Paul.

I saw a painting of his hanging in a gallery in New York early last year. Two men in a painter's studio. Once again, I was amazed by his sheer talent. and like you, until last evening, I hadn't heard of his death. More than four months ago. At 50. Horrible.

It would be nice to hear if there will be a foundation--there should be.


 
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(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
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Offline Penthesilea

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The two paintings of two men tying ties always struck me as interesting--simple, intimate, domestic and yet very sexy. 


Of all the pictures John and Roland posted, that's exactly the one who stood out to me, too. :)


Family Ties

I love the intimacy and domesticity of it. They look like they had been doing it for years, but also as if it were a special occation on this very day.

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I can't get over the hay bale in the foreground. I always think there's a third person in the picture, with her back to the viever, watching the guys. Looks like the hairdo of an elderly lady to me.
And the third person watching them of course reminds me of Aguirre spying through his big-ass binoculars. :-\


(Now if we think fanfiction, it might be Mrs. Twist. ;) :laugh:)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Of all the pictures John and Roland posted, that's exactly the one who stood out to me, too. :)


Family Ties

I love the intimacy and domesticity of it. They look like they had been doing it for years, but also as if it were a special occation on this very day.



If you liked that one, Chrissie, you should really  like this one!    :)



"Ties" 1998





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
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Offline Meryl

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Looks like the hairdo of an elderly lady to me.
And the third person watching them of course reminds me of Aguirre spying through his big-ass binoculars. :-\

Spoken like a true Brokie!  ;D
Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Penthesilea

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Spoken like a true Brokie!  ;D

Thanks. :)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Obviously,
the young Walker
loved Streisand--


"Funny Boy" 2002



"The Way We Were" 2007


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Sason

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i can't get over how prolific he was.

There seems to be an endless flood of paintings.

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Spoken like a true Brokie!  ;D



James Schamus
should like this one--

¿Señor??



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Sason

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LOL

The whole list of "recent posts" on the front page, is from this thread!  ;D

You really struck a chord there, John!


Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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i can't get over how prolific he was.

There seems to be an endless flood of paintings.



Yes.




“I was moved by something that I was capable of doing,” Walker would later recall.




Amazingly talented, he was also quite a worker--




LOL

The whole list of "recent posts" on the front page, is from this thread!  ;D

You really struck a chord there, John!



Thanks, Sonja!

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Oh, my goodness!  :o

This is terrible news.  :'(

At first the name rang no bells--I'm "that way" about names--but when I started to look at the images I was shocked. I know so many of them. I've been in the gallery in Provincetown that sold his works. I've bought cards with reproductions of his work.

I'm no art critic; I'm not competent to judge. But I liked his style of photorealism.

This is a terrible loss.

 :'(
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline milomorris

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One of the things I like about Walker's work is that there is a sense of motion in everything. Even when the subjects are just standing or sitting, you get a sense that they are breathing, blinking, etc.
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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It says this one was done in 2005. I wonder if it could have been inspired by Brokeback Mountain? It certainly invokes thoughts of Ennis.
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Offline ifyoucantfixit

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   Oh my god.  I am so sad about this.  I have admired this mans art, for a very long time now.  I never knew his name however.  I am a great admirerer of his work.  It is possibly the most talented display of emotion from his subjects of any artist ever.  Believe me, I have seen most of the great works of art, if not in person, still studied in one way or another.   I think he deserves to be up there with  all of them. 

  I can never believe the depth of emotion, he can produce, with only two people in a frame.  In many cases even one.  I don't know if it is simply the color palatte that he uses?  Or if it is the fact that many of them are looking away from the viewer, the subjects never look directly toward the "camera".  That in itself is a show of shyness and fear.  It has much to do with body language, but there is more to it than that.  It is just an ability he  seemed to have inately. 

   The ability to show true inner feeling without placing the usual grotesque facial or physical obviousness in most artwork, to display those emotions.  Or the physical horrors.  I am in awe of his talent.  I vow he will become one of the most acclaimed artists of his time.  He may have been, rather introverted, and  shy about  displaying his work.  Possibly because of the insipid mind set in some parts of the world.  However I do believe, when this is more or less, water under the bridge.  He will then be fully recognized by the world for his very special. and wonderful talent.

    I wish I had even a copy, of his work.  He is now my second favorite artist of all tiime, next to VanGoch. Who also had that unique ability to paint emotion.  Even though his art was in the main, landscape.  He also painted subjects as well.  They were almost, seeminegly a practice, of technique, rather an afterthough because of not having anything better to choose from.  Showing the facial features and seemingly to use these, as practice, rather than convey emotion.  He was able to show his own emotions, though, in his landscapes.  Both his lonliness, and the dispair.  The madness is most obvious, in his most famous piece, Starry Night.   He has been until now, in my opinion undisputedly the best.  Now Mr Walker has displayed the same talent, however differently it is on first look. He has shown the singular ability to place both elements into his frames.  At first glance, it seems almost simplistic.  Nearly to the point of being cute.  However on closer examination.  You see the true depth of his ability.  I am in awe...his work is truly magnificent.  His talent will be truly missed.


     This last one brings to mind the new song in Adams recent album.  The  line "Baby I can smell you on my clothes."  From the song Chokehold.  I wish you guys would all check it out.  He has such a great lineup of songs in it.  If it is not your type of favoite, music wise.  I think there is still a lot you could identify with.  He has definitely not gotten the support from the gay community he deserves to.  He is doing so much work and help for the community, I think he deserves to at least be acknowledged for his efforts in this regard.  He truly is in my opinion the most esciting new artist in music today.  I hope he is around for many many years to come.  His is such a great guy, and his talent is boundless.  He is having through his own mindset, plus tremendous pressure from the gay community to become a role model.  He said at first, " don't believe I am qualified to be a roll mode.  I am just a guy, trying to sing, who happens to be gay."  They would not let that happen, and he soon recognized, simply by being in the public eye, he had to make his stand and use his persona to represent the people in the community.  He is working almost nonstop to make and promote his music, and then has worked for two large chariities.  In addition to this he has taken on almost every other group supported activity he has been asked to participate in.  He truly is a great roll model for the community.  I just wish they would support him in kind.  They have generally not been as supportive of him, as he has of them.. I tell you the truth  I find that highly disappointing...

    I do not believe, that the only music gay people listen to is classic, show tunes, or Madonna.  There has to be more diversity to the choices in music than that.  How about Jazz, or dance, or any of the other choices?
« Last Edit: May 19, 2012, 04:03:46 pm by ifyoucantfixit »



     Beautiful mind

Offline southendmd

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I had a lovely talk with James Lyman, owner of the Lyman-Eyer gallery in Provincetown.  After some chit-chat about Steve Walker, he confided that there has been some controversy in the estate, as there are only 32 paintings left.  And no one knows what they are worth, they are in only 4 galleries, two in Canada. 

Regardless, he has the exclusive for the prints, and they are gorgeous--giglee prints on canvas in three sizes.  He has about two dozen large size prints that are signed by the artist.  In addition, most of Walker's oeuvre is available in prints in three size--you can see them on the website link above.  He had quite a few in the small size that I thumbed through, including the Brokeback homage, and the color and texture is really beautiful. 

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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I had a lovely talk with James Lyman, owner of the Lyman-Eyer gallery in Provincetown.  After some chit-chat about Steve Walker, he confided that there has been some controversy in the estate, as there are only 32 paintings left.  And no one knows what they are worth, they are in only 4 galleries, two in Canada. 

Regardless, he has the exclusive for the prints, and they are gorgeous--giglee prints on canvas in three sizes.  He has about two dozen large size prints that are signed by the artist.  In addition, most of Walker's oeuvre is available in prints in three size--you can see them on the website link above.  He had quite a few in the small size that I thumbed through, including the Brokeback homage, and the color and texture is really beautiful. 


Thanks, Paul!!

 :-*


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.southfloridagaynews.com/news/national-news/5698-steve-walker-iconic-gay-painter-50-passes-away.html


Steve Walker,
Iconic Gay Painter, 50,
Passes Away

Written by R.E. Frederique
Thursday, 23 February 2012 10:09
 




His work has been a recognizable part of gay culture for at least the past two decades. Steve Walker’s paintings can be described as pensive, quiet, emotional, haunting, empathetic, knowing. The men who inhabit these paintings tell a story that is at once very personal, yet seemingly familiar to all gay men. Walker himself saw his work as having a universal message.  He once said, “As a homosexual, I have been moved, educated and inspired by works that deal with a heterosexual context. Why would I assume that a heterosexual would be incapable of appreciating work that speaks to common themes in life, as seen through my eyes as a gay man?”
 
Twice in the past two years, Steve Walker has been gracious enough to allow SFGN to use one of his paintings in our publication. Once as the cover for SFGN’s issue for May 24, 2010. Then again last year, as an illustration for Pier Angelo’s moving requiem after the loss of his partner Jack.  The painting Pier had chosen for this purpose was titled “Lost at Sea.”  Walker informed us that, “Ironically, in the painting is my last true love, Turker... who died at the age of 29.... I think of him every day.”  Walker added, “Ten years later, the sadness is still overwhelming.”
 
Entirely self-taught, Steve Walker began painting in the early 1990s after visiting the galleries and museums of Europe. The popularity of Walker’s paintings increased over the years and now sell at prices in the thousands of dollars.  Among his most popular paintings are the images that depict the “Wave Wall” on Fort Lauderdale Beach. His work is represented mainly by Lyman-Eyer Gallery in Massachusetts.
 
Steve Walker died of a heart attack on Jan. 4 at his home in Costa Rica. The funeral will be held in his native Canada on Feb. 25 at 11am – at the Our Lady of the Visitation Parish in Ottawa.
 
As for his legacy, Walker himself said it best in an autobiographical note:  “My paintings contain as many questions as answers. I hope that in its silence, the body of my work has given a voice to my life, the lives of others, and in doing so, the dignity of all people.”
 
SFGN intends to feature the paintings of Steve Walker in the Spring issue of our glossy magazine, The Mirror.  The quality of reproduction will more faithful to the originals than it would be in newsprint.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.southfloridagaynews.com/arts-and-entertainment/arts/6115-steve-walker-looking-back-the-mirror.html


Steve Walker:
Looking Back
(The Mirror )

Written by and images courtesy by
Debbie Burke, Art Frenzie
Friday, 04 May 2012 13:24
 


"Rest on the Flight to Fort Lauderdale"


It still seems very surreal to me and it is with great sadness and regret to write about the sudden passing of my friend and internationally acclaimed artist Steve Walker at the age of 50 on January 4, 2012. We here at Art Frenzie in Wilton Manors, Fla. are mourning his loss along with his family, other friends and the international art world.

We first met Steve in 1997 when we had a problem getting a shipment of his work from his distributor. Their lateness, which screwed up Christmas orders for our clients, prompted us to contact him directly. That initial contact blossomed into not only a wonderful friendship, but also a great business relationship with us becoming his Southeastern distributor…which, by the way has been imitated but will never be duplicated. We invited him to come down to do exhibitions with us when we had our first gallery in the Shoppes of Wilton Manors.
 
The first time he came down here it was unannounced. He surprised us and we introduced his work to Wilton Manors and South Florida, which of course was, and still is, greeted with an awesome response. We had the pleasure of his visits every two to three years since that first one for signing events. We were always joined at the hip during his stays and would book him for as many exhibitions as time allowed. His work has appeared at such places as Georgie's Alibi, Cathode Ray, AnyWayz and many private showings. We even took him up to St. Pete Alibi so we could share his work up there. He loved our community. We always had a great time meeting and greeting fans of his work, and introducing many others to his work.



"Guesthouse"


We would get together every afternoon during his visits and stay together through the exhibitions. We’d hang out until the wee hours sharing lots of laughs and solving all the world’s problems. While visiting he always found his solitary time to explore Fort Lauderdale to get more ideas for future paintings. Steve was a news fanatic and CNN would keep him keenly aware of world events, as he would work on his paintings. He was kind of shy in his own way. He was quiet, introspective and reflective, which always spoke volumes in his paintings. He'd always say "there’s so much strength in silence.”
 
He taught himself to paint after the AIDS epidemic and always hoped that his work would enlighten people. He taught himself to paint and regularly used the themes of love, light, loss, touching, watching, thinking, yearning, reflecting and fearing.
 
"I paint about life, mine and yours,” he always said. His brilliance and insight was absolutely incredible.
 
I must say: he's one of the most talented and visionary artists I ever met in 23 years of being in this business. It was always like Christmas getting the shipments of the new originals he would create for each show. Just seeing the new concepts was very exciting and amazing. Every image tells a myriad of stories and evokes a great variety of emotions in people viewing them.
 


Steve Walker


He always said, "I hope that in its silence, the body of my work has given a voice to my life and lives of others, and in doing so gives dignity to all the people I paint about.”
 
We always sold out of his originals every time along with hundreds of reproductions on canvas and print. It was difficult for him to keep up with the demand for originals at the various galleries around the world.
 
Steve was very profound beyond his years. He was always making notes and sketches of conceptual thoughts for fear that he might forget them. Favorite songs, phrases, movies, celebrities and the great masters he got to see in his travels through Europe influenced his work.
 
Just the titles he would come up with are part of the works of art themselves.
 
He never liked painting faces much. We stayed up all night while he continuously kept signing prints I was feeding him, talking about Barbara Streisand and his fear of not being able to paint her. Not long after that trip he called me said "I did it!!" He had painted an absolutely stunning rendering of a self-portrait of himself as a young man watching Funny Girl,  titled Funny Boy.  How many of us remember the feeling of watching that for the first time? He never did sell that original.
 
We had a lot of great times together. He had a hysterically dry sense of humor. We would always find time during his visits to go somewhere and sing karaoke for him. He loved anything my business partner Bernadette would sing for him. I of course always had to sing "My Man" for him.
 
Many have compared his work to the likes of Hopper 's realism. I believe his unique style has made him comparable to the Norman Rockwell of our society.
 


"Funny Boy 2"


His artwork has also been used on over 20 books worldwide and his works have made their mark all over the world and has received international acclaim.
 
I would just like to say bravo to our beloved friend Steve Walker. You really have left a legacy behind in your paintings. We are very proud to have his entire collection of reproductions for viewing and for purchase on our Facebook Page and in the gallery, while our website is currently under reconstruction.
 
We also carry an extensive collection of Steve's works at Art Frenzie, 2055 Wilton Drive, in Wilton Manors, FL.
 
To our most loveable, pragmatic and sensitive friend Steve, you will be sorely missed here, your beautiful smile, your quick wit and one of a kind charm, simply put - your sheer brilliance. I know you are with the angels now, yet, you have gone way too soon. Rest in peace my friend. From all your friends here at Art Frenzie and in South Florida.
 
We are also planning a local memorial tribute to celebrate Steve's life here locally, date and location to be announced shortly. Please call 954-560-3684 or write [email protected] .


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Haircut" 2001

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Sophia

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Bareback Mountain... I would love to have it on my wall too :)

Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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I have loved this body of work, maybe I should say I have admired it and today I love it because suddenly it is finite and complete. I never really knew of Steve Walker but recognized the common theme and style throughout the images. What a wonderful thing that he chose to create, and what a gift he gave to the whole world.
"It was only you in my life, and it will always be only you, Jack, I swear."

Offline ifyoucantfixit

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    A great deal of his beautiful works seem to be of the same two men.  One a North American with sandy hair.  The other a
fair skinned latin.  I wonder if it may have been he, and his lover?



     Beautiful mind

Offline Sophia

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    A great deal of his beautiful works seem to be of the same two men.  One a North American with sandy hair.  The other a
fair skinned latin.  I wonder if it may have been he, and his lover?

What a great observation. Haven´t thought about that before.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Sason

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There seems to be an endless stream of paintings by him.

I can't believe how prolific he was!

Thanks muchly for your continued posting, John!

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre