Author Topic: What do you call that white condiment?  (Read 20075 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2014, 09:14:02 pm »
None of the above.

Like Webster shows: may-uh-naze.

(Webster actually uses that funny little upside-down "e" that phonetically inclined people use, but I don't know how to get that character to include in a post, or the "a" with a bar over it to show that the vowel is long; both the "a"'s are long. And the accent is on the first syllable.)


Don't know why, but I pronounce it with the 'o' rather than with the "little upside-down 'e' that phonetically inclined people use"--with the o said quite quickly.

The "little upside-down 'e' ", by the way, is called a "shwa"!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwa ' ə '

In linguistics, specifically phonetics and phonology, schwa (sometimes spelled shwa)[1] refers to the mid-central vowel sound (rounded or unrounded) in the middle of the vowel chart, denoted by the IPA symbol ə, or another vowel sound close to that position. An example in English is the vowel sound in the second syllable of the word sofa. Schwa in English is mainly found in unstressed positions, but in some other languages it occurs more frequently as a stressed vowel.

In relation to certain languages, the name "schwa" and the symbol ə may be used for some other unstressed and toneless neutral vowel, not necessarily mid-central.


As for option 3 - MAN-naise--Whut?? Vas is dat, stranger??

I love Google, and I LOVE Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise (/ˌmeɪəˈneɪz/, /ˈmeɪəneɪz/ or /ˈmneɪz/, French: [majɔnɛz] (listen), often abbreviated as mayo,[1] is a Spanish sauce, (from Ma, Menorca) thick, creamy sauce often used as a condiment. It is a stable emulsion of oil, egg yolks and either vinegar or lemon juice,[2] with many options for embellishment with other herbs and spices. Lecithin in the egg yolk is the emulsifier.[3]

Mayonnaise varies in color, but is often white, cream, or pale yellow. It may range in texture from that of light cream to a thick gel. In countries influenced by French culture, mustard is also a common ingredient, but the addition of mustard turns the sauce into a remoulade with a different flavor and the mustard acts as an additional emulsifier.[4][5] In Spain, Portugal and Italy, olive oil is used as the oil, and mustard is never included.

Commercial egg-free mayonnaise-like spreads are available for people who want to avoid animal fat and cholesterol, or who are allergic to eggs.[6]


Origin

The sources agree that the origin is from western Europe, published as early as 1642 in La Suite des Dons de Comus, being a kind of aioli.

Other sources place the origin of mayonnaise as being the town of Ma in Menorca (Spain), from where it was taken to France after Armand de Vignerot du Plessis's victory over the British at the city's port in 1756. According to this version, the sauce was originally known as salsa mahonesa in Spanish and maonesa (later maionesa) in Catalan (as it is still known in Menorca), later becoming mayonnaise as it was popularized by the French.[7]

The Larousse Gastronomique suggests: "Mayonnaise, in our view, is a popular corruption of moyeunaise, derived from the very old French word moyeu, which means yolk of egg."[8] The sauce may have been christened mayennaise after Charles de Lorraine, duke of Mayenne, because he took the time to finish his meal of chicken with cold sauce before being defeated in the Battle of Arques.[9]

Nineteenth-century culinary writer Pierre Lacam suggested that in 1459, a London woman named Annamarie Turcauht stumbled upon this condiment after trying to create a custard of some sort.[10]

According to Trutter et al.: "It is highly probable that wherever olive oil existed, a simple preparation of oil and egg came about particularly in the Mediterranean region, where aioli (oil and garlic) is made."[7]

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term mayonnaise was in use in English as early as 1823 in the journal of Lady Blessington.[11]


 8) 8) 8)

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline x-man

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2014, 09:15:21 pm »
Not only taste, but texture, translucency, everything...or so they tell me!

Segueing on to something else as fast as I can........ :P

No, no, no, Front Ranger.  Let us not try to escape so quickly.  :)  I wonder if the expertise of the "friend" who advised you about the various qualities of the two substances under discussion here might have inadvertently opened up a new question for our pollster: To spit or to swallow."
As you might know, perhaps unfairly, women have the reputation for spitting.  I, on the other hand, was raised with the teaching that spitting was both unsanitary and uncivilized.  What would your "friend" say?  Or has this poll already been done?
Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.  Give him a mask and he will tell you the truth. ---- Oscar Wilde

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2014, 09:34:19 pm »

One other thing:




The unmistakable taste of Hellmann's Real Mayonnaise, with its creamy smooth texture and real simple ingredients originates from the creation of Hellmanns Mayonnaise in a New York deli of Richard Hellmann in 1905. Its quality is symbolized by the Blue Ribbon that is used to mark only the best.


   


But DON'T even try to tell me about:
Gag! I mean--as IF!

 :P :P ::) ::) :laugh: :laugh:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hellmann's_and_Best_Foods


Hellmann's and Best Foods are brand names that are used for the same line of mayonnaise and other food products. The Hellmann's brand is sold in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, and also in Latin America, Europe, Middle East and Canada. The Best Foods brand is sold in the United States west of the Rocky Mountains, and also in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand.

Hellmann's and Best Foods are marketed in a similar way. Their logos and web sites resemble one another, and they have the same English slogan: "Bring out the best".

Both brands were previously sold by the U.S.-based Bestfoods Corporation, which also sold several other food products in addition to Hellmann's and Best Foods mayonnaise. Bestfoods, known as CPC International before 1997, was acquired by Unilever in 2000.


History

In 1905, Richard Hellmann from Vetschau, Germany, opened a delicatessen on Columbus Avenue in New York City, where he used his wife's recipe to sell the first ready-made mayonnaise. It became so popular that he began selling it in bulk to other stores. In 1912 he built a factory for producing Mrs. Hellmann's mayonnaise. It was mass marketed and called Hellmann's Blue Ribbon Mayonnaise. It was so successful, Hellmann closed his delicatessen by 1917 to devote full-time to his mayonnaise business

While Hellmann's Mayonnaise thrived on the U.S. East Coast, the California company Best Foods introduced their own mayonnaise. Best Foods Mayonnaise became popular on the West Coast, and was operating a major plant in San Francisco in the first half of the twentieth century. In 1932, Best Foods bought the Hellmann's brand. By then both mayonnaises had such commanding market shares in their respective halves of the country that the company decided that both brands and recipes be preserved. To this day:

Best Foods Mayonnaise is sold west of the Rocky Mountains, specifically, in and west of Montana, Wyoming (!!!!), Colorado, and New Mexico.

Hellmann's is sold east of the Rockies, specifically, in and east of the Frontier Strip (North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas).[1][2]

In 1955, Best Foods acquired Rosefield Packing Co., makers of Skippy peanut butter. Best Foods was bought by Corn Products Refining Company in 1958 to form Corn Products Company, which in 1969 became CPC International Inc. Hellmann's mayonnaise arrived in the United Kingdom in 1961 and, by the late 1980s, had over 50% market share.[3]

Prior to 1960, Hellmann's and Best Foods were advertised both in the same advertisements. The ads pointed out that it is known as Hellmann's in the East, and Best Foods in the West. Around 1968 the Best Foods brand added the Blue Ribbon from the Hellmann's brand, making them more sister products. Since 2007, both brands have exactly the same design.

In 1997, CPC International split into two companies: Bestfoods, becoming its own company once more, and Corn Product International. [4] Bestfoods was acquired by Unilever in 2000.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2014, 10:06:28 pm »
Thank you, Aloysius. It's telling that Kraft doesn't even call their product mayonnaise but rather, "salad dressing".

As for you, x-man, the rule is swallow, never spit! After all, it's nutritious! (According to my friend, of course)
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2014, 10:11:40 pm »
After all, it's nutritious! (According to my friend, of course)

And according to Xaviera Hollander.

One time, I was playing Trivial Pursuit and we were at the tiebreaker question, so of course I chose Literature. The question, strangely, was "Who is the author of 'Call me Madam' in Penthouse Magazine?" Although I was steamed that this was a literature question, I answered correctly and won the match!
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2014, 10:48:10 pm »



The main difference between Miracle Whip and mayonnaise are the sweeteners: high-fructose corn syrup and sugar are the fourth and fifth ingredients, respectively, of Miracle Whip.

 :o :o :-X :-X :P :P


http://www.neatorama.com/2006/12/22/whats-the-difference-miracle-whip-vs-mayonnaise/#!G9PWS


What's the Difference?
Miracle Whip vs. Mayonnaise

By Alex Santoso
Friday, December 22, 2006 at 3:49 AM




The Dilemma: Two thick white dressings with similar flavor in similar-looking jars are bearing down on you from your refrigerator, and you're asking yourself just one question: "Do I feel lucky?" Well, do ya, punk?

People You Can Impress: deli-goers and anyone killing time in the checkout line.

The Quick Trick: Taste them both side by side. The sweeter one is Miracle Whip.

The Explanation: In 1756, the French under Louis Franois Armand de Vignerot du Plessis, duc de Richelieu, captured Mahn on the Spanish-held island of Minorca. In honor of this victory, the duc's chef created a new dressing for his master: Mahonnaise. It wasn't until 1905, however, at Richard Hellmann's New York deli, that Americans got to taste the goods. But boy, did it catch on! Within seven years, he'd mass-marketed the condiment as Hellmann's Blue Ribbon Mayonnaise.

To be frank, mayo is one of those love-it-or-hate-it things. The lovers know that, in its most authentic form, mayo's a pretty simple affair: raw egg yolks, oil, lemon juice or vinegar, and spices. Not much room for improvement.

But in 1933, Kraft Foods though differently. Inventor Charles Chapman's patented emulsifying machine allowed regular mayonnaise to be evenly blended with cheaper dressings and more than 20 different spices (plus sugar). The result was Miracle Whip, which debuted at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. Promising to create "Salad Miracles with Miracle Whip Salad Dressing," the Whip was an instant hit (Note: It's not known if the dressing is responsible for any non-salad-related miracles.)

The main difference between Miracle Whip and mayonnaise are the sweeteners: high-fructose corn syrup and sugar are the fourth and fifth ingredients, respectively, of Miracle Whip.

And a Word About Grey Poupon: While we're on the subject of condiments, we couldn't resist the opportunity to squeeze in a quick fact about mustard, or more specifically Grey Poupon. While it sounds hoity-toity, the name Grey Poupon isn't so much about the mustard's color as it is the names of two 18th-century big-time mustard firms from Dijon (run by guys cleverly named Maurice Grey and Antoine Poupon). The name can be a bit confusing, and even unappetizing, to French speakers, as poupon means "newborn baby."

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline BradInBlue

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2014, 12:32:21 am »
It's egg yolk and oil. That's mayo. Add some salt, lemon juice, other things and it changes a bit, but at the end of the day, it's mayo. Comparing mayo and Miracle Whip is like comparing butter to margarine. Having said that, I grew up on Miracle Whip and Margarine. Yuck.

xman, can you put sex on the shelf for five seconds and have a meaningful discussion?

Brad


Offline x-man

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2014, 04:26:28 am »
Edited by Penthesilea:
Content temporarily pulled for consideration.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 12:53:43 pm by Penthesilea »
Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.  Give him a mask and he will tell you the truth. ---- Oscar Wilde

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2014, 07:53:39 am »
"Sing Co Deh My Oh"


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline milomorris

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2014, 07:59:09 am »
"Sing Co Deh My Oh"

I like Cinco de Mayo best when it falls on a weekend!!
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.