Author Topic: London Spy: Ben Whishaw, dreamy lover/genius Ed Holcroft and sage Jim Broadbent  (Read 184026 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYMI6_KIM PHILBY



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LM9qVRC-0Q[/youtube]
The BBC has uncovered previously unseen footage of one of Britain's most
infamous spies talking about his work as a double agent.
Published on Apr 4, 2016



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


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and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYMI6_KIM PHILBY


http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/world/europe/kim-philby-bbc-lecture.html


EUROPE
Kim Philby, Lecturing in East Berlin in ‘81,
Bragged of How Easy It Was to Fool MI6

By STEVEN ERLANGER
APRIL 4, 2016



Kim Philby’s grave at a cemetery in Moscow on Monday. Credit Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters



LONDON — Kim Philby, the double agent whose betrayal of his country to the Soviet Union still marks British life, boasted in a 1981 lecture that was recently discovered by the BBC and broadcast on Monday of the ease with which he fooled a complacent establishment.

Mr. Philby, who defected to Moscow in 1963 and died there in 1988 at 76, delivered his hourlong lecture in English in East Berlin to members of the Stasi, the feared East German intelligence service, whose recording of the talk was discovered in the Stasi archives.

Aging and puffy, wearing large dark glasses, Mr. Philby addressed his audience as “dear comrades.” After describing his successes with a cut-glass accent and a deep note of satisfaction, he gave them his best advice: “Deny everything.”

Even when confronted with an incriminating document you wrote, said Mr. Philby, who survived numerous vettings even after his loyalties were in grave doubt, insist “it’s a forgery.”

With a thin smile, he said: “All I had to do really was keep my nerve. My advice to you is to tell all your agents that they are never to confess.”

The son of a famous desert explorer and official in the Indian Empire who later became a Muslim and took the name Hajj Abdullah, Harold Adrian Russell Philby was known as Kim, after the young boy in the Kipling novel who serves his country as a spy.

Born in India, he was educated privately and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where historians now say he was recruited, and not, as he claimed, in Austria in 1934.




Kim Philby in 1955.
Credit Associated Press




In what he called his “30 years in the enemy camp,” Mr. Philby was aided by class assumptions, he said.

“Because I had been born into the British governing class, because I knew a lot of people of an influential standing, I knew that they would never get too tough with me,” he told the Stasi. “They’d never try to beat me up or knock me around, because if they had been proved wrong afterwards, I could have made a tremendous scandal.”

Mr. Philby, with a note of amusement, described how easy it was for him to steal secret documents. He befriended the archivist at MI6 and bought him drinks, and then he had access to files that were not within his area.

“Every evening I left the office with a big briefcase full of reports which I had written myself, full of files taken out of the actual documents, out of the actual archives,” he said. “I was to hand them to my Soviet contact in the evening. The next morning I would get the file back, the contents having been photographed, and take them back early in the morning and put the files back in their place. That I did regularly, year in, year out.”

The best-known video recording of Mr. Philby is from a news conference in 1955, in his mother’s London apartment, in which he denied being a Communist spy after being dismissed by MI6 but cleared in Parliament by Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.

He was later rehired, and it was not until late 1962 that the British became convinced he was a double agent and sent a new interrogator to meet him in Beirut.

Mr. Philby disappeared in January 1963 and emerged in Moscow about six months later. He escaped, he told the Stasi, because of further British incompetence. The agent sent to keep an eye on him could not resist going skiing after hearing that fresh snow had fallen on the Lebanese mountains.

Mr. Philby was part of a ring of Cambridge spies that included Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean, who preceded him to Moscow after Mr. Philby warned them in 1951 that they were under suspicion and about to be interrogated by British counterintelligence officials. Their defection raised more suspicion about Mr. Philby, but he survived the episode.

It was not until 1979 that the long-suspected “fourth man,” Anthony Blunt, an art historian close to the queen, was publicly revealed to have helped recruit the other three men while they were at Cambridge in the 1930s.

But it was the career of Mr. Philby, who set up MI6’s section to spy on the Soviet Union to which he was loyal, that was most astonishing, as he rose to head the very counterintelligence department that should have discovered his treachery.

In 1965, the Russians awarded him the Red Banner of Honor for his services to the K.G.B., and he later received the privileges of a K.G.B. general.

Not without humor, Mr. Philby told the Stasi audience how his Soviet controllers told him to become chief of the anti-Soviet section of MI6 by removing his boss, Felix Cowgill.

“I said, ‘Are you proposing to shoot him or something?’ ” Mr. Philby recalled.

Told to use bureaucratic methods, “I set about the business of removing my own chief,” he said, then added dryly: “You oughtn’t to listen to this,” prompting laughter.

“It was a very dirty story,” said Mr. Philby, whose treachery was responsible for the deaths of hundreds. “But after all, our work does imply getting dirty hands from time to time, but we do it for a cause that is not dirty in any way.”



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2A2g-qRIaU[/youtube]
Kim Philby is interviewed about his association with Guy Burgess.
Uploaded on Dec 30, 2008
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/shortcuts/2016/jan/19/alan-turing-james-bond-london-spy-how-mi5-became-britains-most-inclusive-employer

MI5/MI5
Alan Turing, James Bond
and London Spy:
how the security services became
Britain’s most inclusive employer

Where once homosexuality might have led to blackmail, exposure
or disgrace, MI5 and MI6 now welcome gay people


By Richard Norton-Taylor and Tom Rob Smith
Tuesday 19 January 2016 14.03 EST



Thames House, MI5’s headquarters on London’s Millbank Photograph: Myung Jung Kim/PA



If you had walked past MI5’s headquarters in central London earlier today, you might have noticed the rainbow flag flying above the building. It is not the first time – it flew there on the day of London’s Pride festival last summer. But this time it was raised to mark the accolade of Stonewall’s employer of the year: Britain’s Security Service came top in the annual Stonewall Workplace Equality Index. The index measures an organisation’s work in tackling discrimination and creating an inclusive workplace for lesbian, gay, bi and trans people.

MI5 in particular, it might be argued, needs to be inclusive. Much of its work, as it director general Andrew Parker, said, “goes on by necessity out of view”. Its employees cannot talk about their work with outsiders. They need a workplace that is tolerant and welcoming, and an esprit de corps that encourages diversity.

Historically, when homosexuality was illegal, spying might have been a particularly attractive career for people used to hiding their personal – as well as political – proclivities. They could keep secrets, and tell lies. Perhaps the most notorious gay spies were Guy Burgess and Anthony Blunt, two members of the Cambridge ring whose circle was imbued with sexual liberation, of all kinds. (There was one exception. The ascetic John Cairncross told me years after he was exposed as the “Fifth Man” that he did not take to the fellow members of the spy ring because of their class – which protected them from exposure – and lifestyle.)





Bond gets up close and personal with Raoul Silva (played by Javier Bardem) in Skyfall.
Photograph: Moviestore / Rex Features




Now even James Bond, the most highly charged heterosexual of all spies, is confronted in Skyfall with a flirtatious gay scene when villain Raoul Silva, played by Javier Bardem, undoes Bond’s shirt and strokes his chest while Bond is tied to a chair. “First time for everything?” he asks. Daniel Craig’s Bond, replies: “What makes you think this is my first time?”

In 1954, Alan Turing, the codebreaking genius of wartime Bletchley Park, the forerunner of GCHQ, died in an apparent suicide after battling with his sexuality and being sentenced to chemical castration. More than 50 years later, Gareth Williams, the GCHQ maths genius, was found dead in his London flat while seconded to MI6. His death , unsurprisingly, is often thought to have been an inspiration for the recent BBC2 series, London Spy. The similarities between Williams and Alex, played by Edward Holcroft, are pretty clear – although writer Tom Rob Smith has said his character is a work of fiction. Nevertheless, these are cases – one fact, the other fiction – when their employers did not face up to a duty of care in a profession which can be uniquely lonely.

MI5 now has a LGBT “champion” to promote diversity, an 80-plus-strong LGBT network, and a “reverse mentoring” scheme for staff who want to develop their understanding of diversity. Staff are offered “unconscious bias training”. Meanwhile MI6, Bond’s employer, uses Stonewall’s logo on recruitment ads appealing for people who are “able to get on with diverse groups”.

Until the early 90s, MI5 – like the Secret Intelligence Service, MI6 – prevented gay people from security-sensitive posts on the grounds they were vulnerable to blackmail. MI5 heading Stonewall’s table will be leaving many of Britain’s former security chiefs aghast – and be a lesson to any of them still in post, trying to hold fast to their service’s old and damaging ethos.





The fictional view: Edward Holcroft and Ben Wishaw in the BBC2 drama London Spy.
Photograph: Joss Barratt/BBC/WTTV Limited




‘The Secret Service used to embody the sense that
gay people were not part of mainstream society’
London Spy writer Tom Rob Smith on MI5




The news that MI5 has come top of Stonewall’s employers list is wonderful. My drama London Spy was never intended as a commentary about these organisations today. It was grappling with a historic question, which is why were organisations such as MI5 so adamant that gay people were unsuitable for the secret services? I wanted to look at it from a slightly different perspective, which was that if you are aware that your country would not employ you, or would prosecute you for your sexuality, are you in a sense made a spy by your country?

If that link to your country is cut at a very early age, you look for other countries where you might be able to be happy or welcome. The Soviet Union peddled the myth that there was equality over there, that gay people would be free and happy, and you can see why that was conceptually appealing to some. It was never the fact that gay people were somehow intrinsically less trustworthy, which was certainly the impression having the blanket ban on gay employees gave out. And that was always what the character of Scotty [played by Jim Broadbent] was grappling with historically.

We often talk about equality as somehow doing things for people or minorities. Actually, it benefits society at large. It’s clearly not beneficial to have a group of people feeling disconnected from their country.

One of the reasons this news is so wonderful is that the Secret Service used to embody a sense that gay people were not part of mainstream society. And so for it to go to being the best place for someone who’s gay to work is a really remarkable transformation.


Tom Rob Smith (as told to Daniel Martin)

« Last Edit: April 05, 2016, 10:19:09 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/shortcuts/2016/jan/19/alan-turing-james-bond-london-spy-how-mi5-became-britains-most-inclusive-employer


The fictional view: Edward Holcroft and Ben Wishaw in the BBC2 drama London Spy.
Photograph: Joss Barratt/BBC/WTTV Limited



The news that MI5 has come top of Stonewall’s employers list is wonderful. My drama London Spy was never intended as a commentary about these organisations today. It was grappling with a historic question, which is why were organisations such as MI5 so adamant that gay people were unsuitable for the secret services? I wanted to look at it from a slightly different perspective, which was that if you are aware that your country would not employ you, or would prosecute you for your sexuality, are you in a sense made a spy by your country?

Tom Rob Smith

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Spies like us
As BBC drama London Spy begins, Barry Didcock
explores our abiding fascination with spooks



“I haven't had the John le Carré life, but I have had a life of wondering how I am a spy on some level – and that connects with being gay and leading a double life in the sense that you have this persona,” he explains. “At school I was terrified. I couldn't even comprehend it [being gay] so my way of dealing with it was to say, 'I'll be a much more convincing liar if I can convince myself that it isn't true.' So on one level I shut that whole part of my brain down and I became a spy to myself. I was living a cover that I started to try to believe in order to make it more convincing. That's my reason for getting into spy stories.”

Tom Rob Smith
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/11980812/London-Spy-sex-spooks-and-the-perfect-murder.html


London Spy
sex, spooks
and the perfect murder

A new BBC thriller echoes
the baffling case of the 'spy in the bag’
Tom Rob Smith explains why he wrote it


By Tom Rob Smith
7:00AM GMT 09 Nov 2015



Ben Whishaw plays Danny and Edward Holcroft plays "Joe" (Alex) in London Spy
Photo: Ed Miller/ BBC



Twenty years ago, I stood on the dangerous and decrepit former incarnation of the Hungerford pedestrian bridge that connects the north and south banks of the River Thames. The old bridge was afflicted with crime and it wasn’t a place to linger. But that night, I looked out over the city skyline and asked – as though London were a wise mentor capable of answering back – whether life got any easier.

I don’t recall another occasion when I’ve seriously contemplated suicide. But standing there, I realised that death would be the end of everything good, as well as everything bad. My life, which had been a largely happy one, full of love and potential, would have been rewritten in those troubled hours, as one of perpetual despair leading to that act. I would have wound up as a statistic, engulfed by a much wider narrative about a society in which many young gay people, such as me, struggle to cope.

I’m very glad I lived to tell a different story but perhaps, because of this moment, I’m aware of how the circumstances of some people’s deaths can sometimes present a very misleading picture of their actual lives.

Herein lies the premise for my first television drama series London Spy, a thriller which opens with my character, Danny (played by the Bafta-winning actor Ben Whishaw) standing on Lambeth Bridge, feeling low and asking the London skyline whether life gets any easier.

London answers him with a chance encounter, an early morning runner who stops to ask if he’s OK. Introducing himself as Alex, an unusual connection forms between these men who are opposites in many ways. It’s unusual in the sense that it’s special to both parties, but it’s also unusual for mainstream drama on the BBC, which rarely places gay relationships at the heart of stories.

Alex claims to be working in the financial services: he’s successful and wealthy. He’s also anti-social and profoundly shy, doesn’t do drugs or hang out in clubs. A love story begins that promises happiness for both. However, eight months into their relationship Alex is found dead in a sex room designed for multiple anonymous encounters, littered with drugs and extreme bondage gear.

It is a scenario completely alien to the Alex that Danny has come to know. His perfect love is, in an instant, rewritten. He is no longer this man’s partner but merely one of many nameless sexual hook ups. In death, Danny not only loses his lover, he loses their love story too. It turns out, Alex lied about his job. He wasn’t a banker – he was a spy.

I’ve been asked whether there are parallels between my thriller and the 2010 Gareth Williams case, the GCHQ operative whose body was found in a North Face holdall, padlocked from the outside, in his flat in Pimlico. The key to the padlock was underneath his body, inside the bag.




Mystery: [The real] Gareth Williams was found dead in a locked holdall. The unsolved case
inspired London Spy




I should be clear that this series is entirely a work of fiction: none of the characters are real. It isn’t intended as a commentary on the police investigation or the security services. However, at the heart of the Press and public interest in the Williams case was the question of whether his death told a story of his life, or whether his death was staged to tell a story that would disguise and distract us from his murder. That story, presented to the public, involved the implication of cross-dressing (£20,000 worth of women’s clothing was found in his flat) and a history of bondage websites on his internet browser, leading to suggestions that 31-year-old Williams died alone in an erotic game of escapology.

If it were a murder, the concepts behind its construction were not new. Some years back I stumbled across a training manual allegedly drafted by the CIA and distributed to agents and operatives at the time of the Agency’s 1954 covert coup in Guatemala, which ousted the democratically elected president Jacobo Árbenz Guzmán.

I cannot vouch for this document’s authenticity, and if it turned out to be another agency’s attempt to smear the CIA, I wouldn’t be surprised. Regardless, its ideas remain striking: “For secret assassination… the contrived accident is the most effective technique. When successfully executed it causes little excitement, and is only casually investigated.”

We are now so immersed in paranoia and suspicion that an accident isn’t sufficient to divert our attention – fundamentally we don’t believe in coincidence, but we do believe in stories, or at least, we believe in stories that are well told. In order to make sure a death doesn’t become a murder, the murderer must become a storyteller. A subsection of the manual, under the label “Techniques”, declares: “A subject’s personal habits may be exploited to prepare him for a contrived accident of any kind.”

In order to create a plausible lie, you weave in elements of truth. As with all storytelling, it’s important to have your audience in mind, which means understanding how they react to certain provocations.

Prejudices are useful because they are stories people believe without requiring any evidence. For example, the murder of an alcoholic would be much less suspicious if you killed him with alcohol; the execution of someone with a history of speeding would be less toxic if it was implied that he or she was driving too fast.

In London Spy, the character Danny argues that storytelling of a different kind is at play.

Danny has had his heart broken many times already and the death of Alex seems to confirm a powerful fear that any intimate relationship is doomed (a fear that is particularly prevalent in the gay community, many of whose members grow up believing that their attraction to the same sex could end their careers and could also, thanks to HIV/Aids, end their lives).

He’s certain that even though his partner lied about his job as a spy, he didn’t lie about his true nature. Danny is sure that the “sex room” has been staged. There were no other sexual partners. They were destined to spend the rest of their life together. That is why Danny must fight: if he can prove that the Alex he knew – decent and genuinely looking for love – was the real Alex, then he can prove to himself that intimacy does not necessarily end in despair.

But as with any tale of espionage and double-dealing, Danny’s battle to uncover the truth about his partner is far from straightforward.


London Spy will air on Monday November 9 at 9pm on BBC2





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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 :( :( :( :(



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/11980812/London-Spy-sex-spooks-and-the-perfect-murder.html



By Tom Rob Smith
7:00AM GMT 09 Nov 2015




Twenty years ago, I stood on the dangerous and decrepit former incarnation of the Hungerford pedestrian bridge that connects the north and south banks of the River Thames. The old bridge was afflicted with crime and it wasn’t a place to linger. But that night, I looked out over the city skyline and asked – as though London were a wise mentor capable of answering back – whether life got any easier.

I don’t recall another occasion when I’ve seriously contemplated suicide. But standing there, I realised that death would be the end of everything good, as well as everything bad. My life, which had been a largely happy one, full of love and potential, would have been rewritten in those troubled hours, as one of perpetual despair leading to that act. I would have wound up as a statistic, engulfed by a much wider narrative about a society in which many young gay people, such as me, struggle to cope.

I’m very glad I lived to tell a different story but perhaps, because of this moment, I’m aware of how the circumstances of some people’s deaths can sometimes present a very misleading picture of their actual lives.

Herein lies the premise for my first television drama series London Spy, a thriller which opens with my character, Danny (played by the Bafta-winning actor Ben Whishaw) standing on Lambeth Bridge, feeling low and asking the London skyline whether life gets any easier.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Twenty years ago, I stood on the dangerous and decrepit former incarnation of the Hungerford pedestrian bridge that connects the north and south banks of the River Thames. The old bridge was afflicted with crime and it wasn’t a place to linger. But that night, I looked out over the city skyline and asked – as though London were a wise mentor capable of answering back – whether life got any easier.






Charing Cross Bridge [later to become the Hungerford Bridge] was portrayed in a series of oil paintings by French artist Claude Monet. Painted in between 1899 and 1904, they depict a misty,
impressionistic Charing Cross Bridge in London. The two separate pedestrian paths flanking either side the railway bridge were added much later in 2002.



Poor Tom! I guess in 1995/1996, the Hungerford pedestrian bridge must have been pretty dire. But around 2002 or so, the new paired Hungerford pedestrian 'Golden Jubilee Bridges' opened, one either side nearly touching the old Hungerford Railway Bridge (the tracks lead to Charing Cross Station on the North side of the Thames). At that time, I used to visit London a lot, four or five times a year, and, hearing about the spanking new walkways, I went to look. Beautiful!! I became obsessed. It became my daily walk--I'd charge through Trafalgar Square, down Northumberland Avenue, bound up the steps and walk across the river to Southbank to the National Theatre or the Globe or South to the Old Vic, or the Anchor and Hope gastropub or whatever/wherever. The pedestrian bridges opened South London for me and I loved it. No Danny or Alex though, unfortunately!   ::) ::)



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_Bridge_and_Golden_Jubilee_Bridges
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYMI6_KIM PHILBY



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/world/europe/kim-philby-bbc-lecture.html

But it was the career of Mr. Philby, who set up MI6’s section to spy on the Soviet Union to which he was loyal, that was most astonishing, as he rose to head the very counterintelligence department that should have discovered his treachery.

In 1965, the Russians awarded him the Red Banner of Honor for his services to the K.G.B., and he later received the privileges of a K.G.B. general.

Not without humor, Mr. Philby told the Stasi audience how his Soviet controllers told him to become chief of the anti-Soviet section of MI6 by removing his boss, Felix Cowgill.

“I said, ‘Are you proposing to shoot him or something?’ ” Mr. Philby recalled.

Told to use bureaucratic methods, “I set about the business of removing my own chief,” he said, then added dryly: “You oughtn’t to listen to this,” prompting laughter.

“It was a very dirty story,” said Mr. Philby, whose treachery was responsible for the deaths of hundreds. “But after all, our work does imply getting dirty hands from time to time, but we do it for a cause that is not dirty in any way.”



London Spy
Episode 3
"Blue"



Scottie (Jim Broadbent): I remember taking you to hospital--all those years ago.
There was a chance you'd been infected. We barely knew each other.
You were so young. More child than adult.
I made you promise never to take a risk like that again.


Danny: Scottie, I swear!

Scottie: You promised. You promised me.

Danny: I never broke that promise. I swear to you!
If you don't believe me, I don't have anyone else, Scottie, I don't have anyone else!
You have to believe.


Scottie: I believe you. I knew you were a young man who'd make a lot of mistakes.
But never the same one twice. I believe you.
I believe they deliberately infected you. Not to kill you, obviously.
With medication, you'll live a long and normal life.
They did it to discredit you.
They'll say you took risks with your own health.
You were reckless--and irresponsible.
Perhaps they'll even say that you infected Alex.


Danny: No. He, he was--

Scottie: He was negative. But what will the test say?
The story of you two has been written. It was written many months ago.
A sordid tale--the details of which will leak out into the public sphere.
People will recoil.
Many will think you got what you deserved.
No one will campaign for answers. No one will demand justice.








Danny: These people--

Scottie: Yes.

Danny: They'd do anything.







Yes.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/11980812/London-Spy-sex-spooks-and-the-perfect-murder.html

Herein lies the premise for my first television drama series London Spy, a thriller which opens with my character, Danny (played by the Bafta-winning actor Ben Whishaw) standing on Lambeth Bridge, feeling low and asking the London skyline whether life gets any easier.




"I want to tell you a story about--"
a bridge. In fact,
a city of bridges--















[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dsi3r_FokI[/youtube]
http://mangobango2.tumblr.com/
Published on Dec 26, 2015






"All I Want"
by Kodaline
2012


All I want is nothing more
To hear you knocking at my door
'Cause if I could see your face once more
I could die a happy man I'm sure

When you said your last goodbye
I died a little bit inside
I lay in tears in bed all night
Alone without you by my side

But If you loved me
Why'd you leave me?
Take my body
Take my body
All I want is
And all I need is
To find somebody
I'll find somebody like you

So you brought out the best of me
A part of me I've never seen
You took my soul and wiped it clean
Our love was made for movie screens

But If you loved me
Why'd you leave me?
Take my body
Take my body
All I want is
And all I need is
To find somebody
I'll find somebody

If you loved me
Why'd you leave me?
Take my body
Take my body
All I want is
All I need is
To find somebody
I'll find somebody like you


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kodaline




[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtf7hC17IBM[/youtube]
Published on Sep 9, 2012

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzuXZfKg2YM[/youtube]
Published on Oct 3, 2013










London Spy Quotable Quote:

http://www.vulture.com/2016/01/london-spy-recap-season-1-episode-1.html

Jack Mirkinson
January 21, 2016 11:19 p.m.



(....)

--Cut to the morning. Danny exits the club, looking decidedly worse for wear. He's jittery, high, and lost. We follow him down to the edge of the Thames, where he shatters his phone into pieces. As he slumps to the ground, a beautiful man runs by. He stops, then picks up the pieces of Danny's phone. Their eyes meet. You know the rest.

If you're thinking that this handsome stranger would turn out to be important, you're correct. (How did you know?) His name is "Joe". He's closeted, he's an investment banker, and he lives a regimented life in the kind of gleaming fantasy flat that either inspires jealousy or revolutions. The two make an intriguing pair. Edward Holcroft has that overripe, full-lipped, halting delicacy a besotted Victorian might extol in a love poem; Ben Whishaw is a bedraggled alien with a heart of gold. Danny, who works in a warehouse, is also living a decidedly boho-scrounger life, whereas "Joe" is possibly the poshest person in London. No matter, though. Both are thunderstruck.


(....)






« Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 08:37:57 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"