Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 239644 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Hard to miss the point that The Guardian  really, really liked the film!


https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/dec/22/the-50-top-films-of-2017-no-1-call-me-by-your-name




Call Me By Your Name
Best culture 2017

The 50 top films of 2017: No 1
Call Me by Your Name
Peter Bradshaw celebrates a peach of a film about ecstatic submission
to love –the united No 1 choice of our British and American critics


by Peter Bradshaw
@PeterBradshaw1

Fri 22 Dec ‘17 01.00 EST



Reaches out to anyone with a pulse... Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name



This priority is often overlooked, but pure sensual pleasure is an important part of cinema. So it’s a thrill to see a really outstanding film which provides it, as well as being itself about sensual pleasure – about the desire that precedes it, about an ecstatic submission to love, about the intelligent cultivation of all these things. It is a story of a passionate affair between an older and younger man and reaches out to anyone with a pulse.

James Ivory has adapted André Aciman’s novel and it is directed by Luca Guadagnino. This film constitutes a distinct advance from his previous (excellent) film, A Bigger Splash, which in turn developed the promise of the one before that, I Am Love.

The setting is the early 1980s and Armie Hammer plays Oliver, a handsome, brilliant young scholar who has been invited to the Italian lakeside villa of a distinguished professor of antiquities, Mr Perlman, played by Michael Stuhlbarg, to assist him in his research. It is not, in fact, an onerous task, more a privilege for a favoured grad student. An idyllic, leisured summer is in prospect, with a little cataloguing and venturing out with Perlman to view those classical statues that have been recovered from the lake.

But all that’s really required is good conversation and companionship. Oliver doesn’t have to do much more than hang out with Perlman’s charming family, neighbours and friends; swimming, bicycling, lunching, dining, dancing, drinking, sunbathing in various states of alluring undress. The local women admire the beautiful Oliver and so does Perlman’s delicate, moody, highly strung son Elio, played by Timothée Chalamet. There are some heterosexual encounters for them, but these are each just prototypical foreplay for the main event: the hookup between Elio and Oliver.

Since this film has come out, a lot has been made critically of Elio and Oliver’s scene with the peach, and that is a sensationally erotic and candid moment, with hints of TS Eliot’s Prufrock, or even Philip Roth’s Portnoy’s Complaint. But it isn’t why I value the movie, whose moments of passion and yearning are more diffuse, less showy, though no less explicit. Oliver and Elio’s love is exciting and sexy and moving because of the sophistication and emotional intelligence with which it is framed: a physical liaison in which a great deal is a stake, but intriguingly, homophobia as such does not seem to be the major issue or crucial plot point that it would be in almost any other drama. Oliver says that his father would be disgusted, but Elio’s father very much is not, and his understanding and moral wisdom is part of what makes this film such a thing of wonder, particularly in his final speech to Elio, reproduced closely from Aciman’s original book. Intriguingly, Guadagnino has now announced his Linklateresque intention to develop a sequel, based on later parts of the novel, which this film does not touch on.

Call Me By Your Name reminded me of the extravagant passion of early Alan Hollinghurst novels like The Folding Star  or The Spell, and I can easily imagine Guadagnino bringing those to the screen. Hammer himself gives an excellent performance: sensitive and authoritative, though perhaps he is rather obviously older than his character’s age, and so the difference in age and worldly knowledge is greater than is theoretically intended in the drama. Stuhlbarg is always such a great performer – a leading player in the CoensA Serious Man – but often confined to supporting roles. Yet rarely are they are wonderfully written as this. And Chalamet is piercingly honest as Elio. It is the kind of performance that isn’t just down to actorly technique but openness and emotional purity. It’s an unmissable film.





And 2 months prior--








People sunbathe; they impetuously jump up and go swimming, have unhurried meals al fresco, cycle into town to drink in bars, or play volleyball. At any one time, nothing is happening, and everything is happening. Elio and Oliver will catch each other’s eye in their adjoining bedrooms or downstairs in the hall; they will casually notice each other changing into swimming costumes. Each of these intensely realised, superbly controlled and weighted moments is as gripping as a thriller.




https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/26/call-me-by-your-name-review-luca-guadagnino-armie-hammer




Call Me by Your Name
gorgeous gay love story seduces and overwhelms
Set during an endless Italian summer, Luca Guadagnino's ravishing drama starring
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet is imbued with a sophisticated sensuality

★★★★★
by Peter Bradshaw
@PeterBradshaw1

Thursday 26 October 2017 10.30 EDT



Hellenic sensuality is resurrected in concert with the not-so-secret sexual tumult emerging all about: Timothée Chalamet and
Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




The debt to pleasure is deferred in exquisite style for this ravishingly beautiful movie set in Northern Italy in the early 80s: a coming-of-age love story between a precocious teenage boy and a slightly older man. Their summer romance is saturated with poetic languor and a deeply sophisticated sensuality.

The film is directed by Luca Guadagnino (who made I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash) and adapted from the novel by André Aciman by James Ivory, who had originally been slated to co-direct and has a producer credit. Ivory’s presence inevitably calls to mind his film version of EM Forster’s Maurice, to which this is frankly superior. For me, it brought back Alan Hollinghurst novels such as The Folding Star  and The Spell. Call Me By Your Name  is an erotic pastoral that culminates in a quite amazing speech by Michael Stuhlbarg, playing the boy’s father. It’s a compelling dramatic gesture of wisdom, understanding and what I can only call moral goodness.

Stuhlbarg plays Perlman, a middle-aged American professor of classical antiquity living with his stylish wife Annella (Amira Cesar), in a handsome Italian house with their son, Elio – a remarkable performance from Timothée Chalamet – who is a very talented musician, spending his time transcribing Schoenberg and composing piano variations on JS Bach. Theirs is a cultured household, in which everyone is proficient in English, French, Italian and, for Annella, German. The family is also Jewish. Elio calls them “Jews of discretion”, a sense of otherness that is to serve as a metaphor for concealed sexuality.

Elio slopes and mopes about the huge house as the long hot summer commences, grumpy and moody, not knowing what to do with himself or his directionless sexuality, shooing away flies, frowning over paperbacks, dressed mostly in nothing more than shorts, all shoulder blades and hairless calves. Every year, his dad invites a favoured grad student to spend the summer with the family to help him with research. This year it is the impossibly handsome and statuesque Oliver, played by Armie Hammer, who never wears a pair of long trousers in the entire film. He establishes his academic credentials early on by presuming to correct Perlman’s derivation of the word “apricot”. Both Elio and Oliver are to have romantic associations with local young women, but it is more than clear where this is heading. And when the main event arrives, Guadagnino’s camera wanders tactfully away from their bed, gazing thoughtfully out of the window at the hot summer night.

What is perhaps so incredible is the concept of leisure, a cousin to pleasure, pure gorgeous indolence and sexiness for six whole weeks. No one appears to have very much to do in the way of dreary work, despite the references to typing up pages and cataloguing slides. People sunbathe; they impetuously jump up and go swimming, have unhurried meals al fresco, cycle into town to drink in bars, or play volleyball. The main work-related activity is when Perlman and Oliver go to inspect a sensational discovery: parts of a classical statue recovered from a lake. Hellenic sensuality is resurrected in concert with the not-so-secret sexual tumult emerging all about.

At any one time, nothing is happening, and everything is happening. Elio and Oliver will catch each other’s eye in their adjoining bedrooms or downstairs in the hall; they will casually notice each other changing into swimming costumes. Each of these intensely realised, superbly controlled and weighted moments is as gripping as a thriller. Hammer’s Oliver is worldlier than Elio, but not a roué or a cynic; in an odd way, Elio is more cosmopolitan than Oliver. The visiting American looks like a mix of Tom Ripley and Dickie Greenleaf.

Chalamet’s performance as Elio is outstanding, especially in an unbearably sad sequence, when he has to ring his mum from a payphone and ask to be driven home. (In that scene, Guadagnino contrives to show an old lady fanning herself in the right-hand side of the frame. Was she an actor? A non-professional who just happened to be there? Either way, there is a superb rightness to it.) And then there is Stuhlbarg’s speech advising against the impulse to cauterise or forget pain: “We rip out so much of ourselves to be cured of things faster than we should that we go bankrupt by the age of 30.” There is such tenderness to this film. I was overwhelmed by it.








And 9 months before that--








Call Me by Your Name  is a masterful work because of the specificity of its details. This is not a love story that “just happens to be gay”. The level of trust and strength these characters share brings a richness that is not necessarily known to a universal audience. But the craft on display from all involved is an example, yet again, of how movies can create empathy in an almost spiritual way. This is a major entry in the canon of queer cinema.




https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jan/23/call-me-by-your-name-review-italian-romance




Sundance 2017
Call Me by Your Name
Sundance 2017 Review
Luca Guadagnino's masterful coming-of-age tale of an Italian fling between visiting academic
Armie Hammer and professor’s son Timothée Chalamet is a major addition to the queer canon


by Jordan Hoffman
@jhoffman

Monday 23 January 2017 06.27 EST



‘Touching and triumphant’ ... Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




Let’s bite right into the sweetest part of the fruit while it’s ripe. There’s a scene near the end of Luca Guadagnino's adaptation of André Aciman's novel Call Me by Your Name  between Michael Stuhlbarg and Timothée Chalamet that is, I feel confident in saying, one of the best exchanges between father and son in the history of cinema. We’ll all be quoting from it for the rest of our lives.

For many it will be a moment of wish fulfilment, and that may go doubly for queer people whose parents tragically reject them for their nature. The scene is touching and triumphant, but it wouldn’t work on an island. It comes after a build-up, an unhurried coming-of-age tale set in 1980s Italy reminiscent of the best of Eric Rohmer, Bernardo Bertolucci and André Téchiné, in which Elio (Chalamet) falls in love with Oliver (Armie Hammer) and needs to decide how he’ll direct the rest of his life.

Oliver is the latest in a string of annual research assistants joining Professor Perlman (Stuhlbarg) at his family’s fabulous summer villa. Elio’s father is an archaeologist/art historian, and his French mother (Amira Casar) recites German poetry, translating it on the fly as the two men in her life cuddle up with her on the couch. For fun Elio transcribes classical piano scores, which he can also transpose to guitar. The Perlman family is one that can slip a reference to Heidegger into conversation and no one will bat an eye.

It’s a world where the broad-shouldered, blond Oliver fits in nicely. He savagely owns Professor Perlman with his mad etymology skills, breaking down the word “apricot” to its Latin, Greek and Arabic roots. His half-unbuttoned shirt reveals a Star of David necklace, which catches 17-year-old Elio by surprise. (Elio later explains that his mother considers the Perlmans “Jews [of] discretion” in the sleepy northern Italian vacation village.) At first Elio is annoyed by Oliver, but quickly becomes infatuated. How Oliver feels about Elio is more of a mystery, but as the days and nights continue (so many meals outside! And dancing to the Psychedelic Furs!) the invitations to “go for a swim” eventually turn intimate.

Of the numerous fascinating, nuanced and realistic facets to their relationship, it’s hard at times to determine who is the driving force. Elio seems the aggressor, and unashamed about his feelings. (Though why is he so determined that his family’s gay friends catch him smooching a vacationing French girl?) Oliver seems so lithe, but are his initial rejections meant to protect Elio, or is he himself panicked about doing “something bad”? Luckily, this is a movie wise enough for its characters to be a little contradictory.

Luca Guadagnino’s last two films, A Bigger Splash  and I Am Love,  were both highly stylised, with dazzling extreme closeups, high-speed editing and brash musical selections. To put it in blunt terms, he reels it in this time. Scenes play out at a pace more befitting a summer in the Italian sun, and while there’s no shortage of well-placed props (a Robert Mapplethorpe print here, a Talking Heads T-shirt there) the natural settings and ancient cities are enough to keep the frame looking marvellous. A lesser film-maker (and co-writers including Walter Fasano and the great 88-year-old James Ivory) would probably cut the scene where bike-riding Elio and Oliver ask for a glass of water from an old woman peeling beans outside an old house. But these are the true-to-life grace notes that make this film so touching.

Call Me by Your Name  is a masterful work because of the specificity of its details. This is not a love story that “just happens to be gay”. The level of trust and strength these characters share brings a richness that is not necessarily known to a universal audience. But the craft on display from all involved is an example, yet again, of how movies can create empathy in an almost spiritual way. This is a major entry in the canon of queer cinema.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline southendmd

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So, I finally saw the film again this afternoon. My first time was back in October at the New York film festival with John (in row Y) and Meryl and I in row A. Our view was severely distorted in the huge theatre at Lincoln Center.

I’d write a review, but I keep breaking into sobs every five minutes, so I won’t. It was almost like seeing it for the first time.  I certainly noticed more details and nuances and the performances are just overwhelming.

I heartily concur with most of the reviews that John has so kindly posted here.

It is a true masterpiece of filmmaking.

Meanwhile, Sufjan Stevens’ music is haunting me.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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So, I finally saw the film again this afternoon. My first time was back in October at the New York film festival with John (in row Y) and Meryl and I in row A. Our view was severely distorted in the huge theatre at Lincoln Center.

I’d write a review, but I keep breaking into sobs every five minutes, so I won’t. It was almost like seeing it for the first time.  I certainly noticed more details and nuances and the performances are just overwhelming.

I heartily concur with most of the reviews that John has so kindly posted here.

It is a true masterpiece of filmmaking.

Meanwhile, Sufjan Stevens’ music is haunting me.





Lovely, Paul. I've seen it three times--so far. I'm pacing myself. I'll definitely see it again with Meryl at the Paris on New Year's Eve Eve.

Re Sufjan--yup, every time, each Sufjan Stevens song, the tears fall. The plinky-plunky chords of Futile Devices  (Doveman Remix Version) start, Elio (sitting outside in the encroaching dark) plaintively asks Mafalda (headed home, I guess, after a hard day's work) if she has seen Oliver, and she curtly says no, she hasn't, and I lose it.

Sigh. Poor Elio.  :(







CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFAN
https://www.garow.me/users/erkinaken/4225893710

my thoughts only
going nowhere

by @erkinaken

I watched it...finally ✌️ Beautiful and delicate...
Everything fell into the right place for me.
Gonna go watch it again

...
Wonderful @tchalamet and @armiehammer



CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFAN by @erkinaken

https://www.garow.me/users/erkinaken/4225893710


2017/12/05 06:45:19

« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 11:37:49 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rckNI80cNw[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rckNI80cNw
"This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by Sony Pictures Entertainment."
I thought it would be taken down. Oh well, good or for ill, it is now.


SPOILER! This is the actual
last 3:19 of the movie--
IF YOU WANT TO WAIT
UNTIL YOU SEE THE MOVIE
DON'T WATCH THE VIDEO!
Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Call Me by Your Name
Sufjan Stevens - Visions of Gideon

This is the ending scene of the movie "Call Me By Your Name".
Music "Visions Of Gideon - Sufjan Stevens"

All copyrighted material belongs their respective owners


Drawing MyLife
Published on Dec 21, 2017







Once again--
but this time
the Sufjan Stevens song
from the actual recording,
not from a screening--








These are the last few minutes of the movie,
Elio looking into the fire, crying and remembering--
until his mother's voice calls


"Elio--"








[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiBUIwzN6FA[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiBUIwzN6FA
The accompanying
still is the very last few
moments of the movie--

Sufjan Stevens - Visions of Gideon
Call Me by Your Name
Soundtrack released November 3 2017


Jonathan Yule
Published on Nov 3, 2017








It's the summer of 1983, and precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman is spending the days with his family at their 17th-century villa in Lombardy, Italy. He soon meets Oliver, a handsome doctoral student who's working as an intern for Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.







STILL not sure about
those lyrics yet--oh well!
 :-\ :-\


Sufjan Stevens "Visions of Gideon"
From the film CALL ME BY YOUR NAME by Luca Guagagnino



Visions of Gideon

I have loved you for the last time

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

I have touched you for the last time

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?
Is it a video?

I have loved you for the last time

Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon

I have kissed you for the last time

Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon


« Last Edit: December 27, 2017, 09:04:02 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjKlIg4aZDk[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjKlIg4aZDk
WOAH! I guess the hand-made
music videos with edits of clips
are about to explode--and I
have to say I love this video!


"So, give me something for when you leave"

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'Breathe' (2017) by Mako
(Alex Seaver and Logan Light)


"so, give me something for when you leave
'cause I can't hardly breathe"

movie: call me by your name

don't mind me i'm on edge, i'm sorry i had to do something because my hands were trembling like since i saw a movie

it's very simple and i wanted it to be like that
raw like the movie is

this edit is more for me than for someone else out there, but if you will enjoy that would be also great

if you haven't seen this movie or didn't read the book..
just freakin do it, it's the best things that could ever happen to you, i promise you


_______________________

ask: ask.fm/JDolgovaa
twitter: twitter.com/JDolgovaa
tumblr: julia36229.tumblr.com

song 'breathe' by mako

"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."


Julia36229
Published on Dec 21, 2017



Here's the original
video with lyrics--the song is
definitely not 1980's,
very 2017--but I like it a lot
with Elio/Oliver edits above!




[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdrFVNbaNvI[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdrFVNbaNvI

'Breathe' (2017) by Mako
[Official Lyric Video]
(Alex Seaver and Logan Light)


Proximity
Published on Dec 7, 2017

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,620]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-14zFlaXXE[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-14zFlaXXE
Yep, there are going to be a lot of these--
good, bad, middling. I like this video--simply because
it's lovely to remember the wonderful images--


"Where are you now?"

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'Faded' (2015)
(Alan Walker and Iselin Solheim)


ISHTAR
Published on Dec 21, 2017





And here's the original video;
the song is from 2015--




[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60ItHLz5WEA[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60ItHLz5WEA

'Faded' (2015)
(Alan Walker and Iselin Solheim)


Alan Walker
Published on Dec 3, 2015




« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 03:48:08 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Otherwise, they’re a study in contrasts. The solidly built 24-year-old Oliver is confident and bruisingly athletic; Elio, long and lanky, tends to hang on the outskirts of social situations, testing the waters. The first time Oliver touches him – casually, even fraternally – Elio jolts like he’s been shocked. It’s the first spark. A love affair is inevitable, but Luca Guadagnino doesn’t skim over Elio’s prolonged longing, which is what makes Call Me By Your Name  most potent as a coming-of-age picture, not a mere romance.





https://www.austinchronicle.com/calendar/film/2017-12-22/call-me-by-your-name/



REVIEW:
Call Me by Your Name
★★★★1/2
by KIMBERLEY JONES
Fri 22 Dec 2017



A study in contrasts, it’s the first spark... Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name



Heavy with summer heat yet so light, so lyrical, in its vision of that catch-of-breath space between adolescence and adulthood, Call Me By Your Name  is a revelation – a richly evocative reminder of that time of life when cuddles with parents overlap with the nervous, excited baring of body and soul of first love.

Seventeen-year-old Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) is on that cusp, and he can feel it. It’s making him scratchy. An only child vacationing with his parents in their villa in northern Italy in 1983, Elio fills the days lazily: swimming, eating, napping, transcribing music (he’s a talented pianist), sometimes bored, sometimes sullen from the displacement of being no longer a kid, but not quite an adult. In other words – a teenager. That displacement turns literal in the opening moments of the film, when Elio must cede his bedroom to Oliver (Armie Hammer), an American grad student come abroad to intern with Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an antiquities scholar. “The usurper,” Elio smirkingly nicknames Oliver, in French; one of the film’s seductive qualities – of which there are many, including the luscious scenery – is the way the whole Perlman family slides in and out of languages, English, French, Italian, and dead, the latter in a charmingly eggheaded pas de deux over etymological roots.

That fluidity in language isn’t showing off. Director Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash, I Am Love) and screenwriter James Ivory (adapting from André Aciman’s formative novel) layer such details to enrich and distill the relationships. When Elio switches to English with his French girlfriend, she feels the chill. When the close-knit Perlman trio curls up on a rainy night to read aloud a 17th century romance, it’s a perfect summation of their love of learning, of beauty, of opening up to sensation. And when Elio spies a Star of David on a chain around Oliver’s neck, he finds a point of commonality with the American usurper.

Otherwise, they’re a study in contrasts. The solidly built 24-year-old Oliver is confident and bruisingly athletic; Elio, long and lanky, tends to hang on the outskirts of social situations, testing the waters. The first time Oliver touches him – casually, even fraternally – Elio jolts like he’s been shocked. It’s the first spark.

A love affair is inevitable, but Guadagnino doesn’t skim over Elio’s prolonged longing, which is what makes Call Me By Your Name  most potent as a coming-of-age picture, not a mere romance. Their age gap has caused some consternation, especially in this particular cultural moment in which consent is rightfully being chewed over on a public stage. It’s worth noting that the film is set in the more permissive early Eighties, and they’re comfortably within the consent laws of Italy. If that doesn’t check the boxes for you, that’s fine; this isn’t the movie for you. Still, the film doesn’t pretend the age gap doesn’t exist. Oliver’s hesitancy in starting the affair, and the care he takes with Elio, are so crucial to the story. In his best work since his breakout in The Social Network, Hammer physically conveys the transformation of Oliver under Elio’s influence, his body tight with restraint, then loosening to the point of a childlike giddiness.

Guadagnino uses a technique throughout of fixing the camera focus and letting his actors move in and out of it, a stylistic choice that reaches its emotional apex with Hammer, at the end of Oliver’s Italian idyll. No words are spoken, but again there’s that layering of detail: We know enough to know the stakes are higher for Oliver, and the camera shifts from focused to fuzzy subtly convey how full up with feeling he is. Chalamet – who co-starred in Lady Bird, another coming-of-age picture that would make a toothsome double feature with this one – brings great physicality to his part, too. But it’s his face that’ll stop your heart, especially in two prolonged close-ups set to original songs by Sufjan Stevens, confessional lyrics simpatico with the actor’s open face. As for words? The script gives Stuhlbarg – a character actor who elevates everything he’s in – the monologue of a lifetime, which he delivers sotto voce, all kindness.

And that is perhaps the prevailing note of Call Me By Your Name – of kindness, of tenderness. Be it a besotted lover, a best friend, or devoted parents, they’re all a kind of welcoming committee, nurturing Elio into adult feeling. That includes pain. And it is a gift.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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by @sirayy

Merry Xmas to sweetie @tchalamet 🎄🎄 🍑 🙊🙊

CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy



1:29 PM Dec 24, 2017 19 Notes, 427 Likes


Fan Art / Digital Art / Drawings / @sirayyg
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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Merry Christmas is right !!!


 Kyle Buchanan
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6:32 AM - 25 Dec 2017
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 Kyle Buchanan
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7:53 AM -  23 Jan 2017
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« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 02:48:27 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011


FYI:




 Kyle Buchanan
                                      @kylebuchanan



6:32 AM - 25 Dec 2017
96 Retweets 404 Likes


https://twitter.com/kylebuchanan
https://twitter.com/kylebuchanan/status/945301109916106752


 





http://www.vulture.com/2017/11/who-is-call-me-by-your-name-actor-timothe-chalamet.html



Call Me by Your Name 's
Timothée Chalamet Is a Superfan Who Made It Big
The 21-year-old lead of 2017’s most swoon-worthy film is about to blow up.
How he’s dealing with fame, acclaim, and those old rap videos.


By Kyle Buchanan
November 29, 2017 11:01 am



Photo by: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images



It was July 3, 2010, and Amar’e Stoudemire was the most-wanted man in New York City. The star basketball player had just opted out of his contract with the Phoenix Suns, and rumors were flying that he was about to sign an insanely lucrative five-year contract with the New York Knicks worth almost $100 million. Stoudemire arrived in the city that afternoon and, like so many out-of-towners had before him, he decided to commemorate the occasion by taking in a Broadway show.

“Rock of Ages,” he tweeted. “It’s going to be great.”

When Timothée Chalamet saw that tweet, he zipped up his white hoodie and sprang into action. The then-14-year-old LaGuardia High School student stuffed a Knicks jersey into his backpack and raced from his Hell’s Kitchen home to the Brooks Atkinson Theatre near Times Square, hoping to win an autograph from the hotly pursued basketball star. Rock of Ages  had already started by the time Chalamet got there, but he camped out for two hours until Stoudemire finally emerged from the theater, a New York Yankees cap pulled low on his head but his nearly seven-foot body still pitched to the heavens.

Chalamet darted in, offering his jersey and a felt-tip marker. The boy had come prepared. So had the paparazzi, who’d been staking out the Brooks Atkinson alongside him.

Chalamet, who is now 21 and starring in the film Call Me by Your Name, recalled the story recently at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel, building to a triumphant smile. “In fact,” he said, “the first picture of Amar’e ever holding a New York jersey was in the Daily News, and there’s a young me holding the jersey up to him to get him to sign it!”





Chalamet and Stoudemire in 2010. Photo: Splash News / Alamy Stock Photo


Chalamet is on the verge of becoming a major actor, but to spend any time with him is to learn that he is still a big fan at heart. Just this week, after winning the Breakthrough Actor trophy at the Gotham Awards, an excited Chalamet used his speech to pay tribute to New York artists who inspire him — “John Leguizamo! Cardi B! Martin Scorsese!” he extolled — and now, thanks to Call Me by Your Name, Chalamet has devoted young fans of his own. They call him “King” on Twitter, and they dig up his old audition videos and school projects to disseminate like contraband on Tumblr. They wish Chalamet “good morning” and “good night” every day without fail, and they change their screen names to incorporate his. All this for a movie that has only just come out in the United States, and an actor who is tipped to be nominated for an Academy Award but is not yet a household name.

“It’s thrilling,” Chalamet said, “with a grain of salt.” As an example, he described to me an October screening of Call Me by Your Name  at Lincoln Center where he sat onstage, basking in applause and audience adoration, and then fell backward out of his chair: “To do that in front of 1,300 people was devastating in the moment, but also a great lesson of, ‘You know what, man? Nothing’s changed.’”

Nothing, perhaps, except the fans who found it so endearing that a clip of his fall then got over a thousand likes on Twitter.

All that attention is fitting, given the story that has put Chalamet in the spotlight. In Call Me by Your Name, he plays precocious Elio, who spends six summer weeks in Italy fixated on Oliver (Armie Hammer), the handsome grad student who has come to work with Elio’s professor father. Before he becomes Oliver’s lover, Elio is the strapping American’s most ardent fan, and in the André Aciman book that Call Me by Your Name  is based on, Elio’s thoughts spill out in first-person as he analyzes every word uttered, swimsuit worn, or move made by his crush. Call Me by Your Name  isn’t just a love story between two people, it’s a story of being sustained by the act of love, of stoking it constantly and delighting in the pain and joy that it brings. Though the story takes place in the early 1980s, it’s easy to imagine a modern-day Elio who, instead of scrawling unsent love notes to Oliver, would post those missives to a social-media account to be read by online friends in the throes of their own obsessions.

Chalamet is well-cast to portray that feeling. Like Elio, he enthuses about what he loves; he also occupies that liminal phase between boy and man, and is now transitioning from aspirant to full-time artist. Chalamet grew up in New York City and has been acting since he was a child, popping up in Homeland and Interstellar as well as leading the John Patrick Shanley play Prodigal Son, but unlike many former child performers, who can become hardened and artificial over time, Chalamet remains an appealing open book.

“Timmy is, without a doubt, the most emotionally accessible human being I have ever come across in my life,” Hammer told me. “You say something to him and you watch the entire thought process play out on his face.” I can confirm that: During a conversation about one of Call Me by Your Name ’s music cues — Joe Esposito’s addictively cheesy ballad Lady, Lady, Lady, which plays as Elio watches Oliver dance with a girl friend — Chalamet went from smiling to choked up in the span of a few seconds. “God, even talking about it now brings tears to my eyes, and I don’t know why,” he said.

Director Luca Guadagnino needed that level of vulnerability for Call Me by Your Name, since many near-wordless stretches of the film involve Elio alone, including an already famous final shot that plays out in minutes of stunning close-up. Chalamet was recommended to the director by Call Me by Your Name producer Peter Spears, whose husband is Chalamet’s agent, and in their initial meeting, Guadagnino found himself beguiled by the young actor’s emotional acuity. Once he was officially cast in the film, Chalamet relocated to Italy weeks early to take language and music lessons, reading Aciman’s book over and over as preparation. “There is the intellectual research that does go into it, and I try to do that as diligently as I can,” Chalamet said, “but when it comes time to shoot, in my experience, I try to throw it all away and trust that I’ve done the work.”

To judge from the rave reactions he has gotten from critics and fans, that hard work has paid off, but Chalamet was quick to credit his collaborators. (Guadagnino, he told me, “is one of the most talented filmmakers of his generation, in my naïve 21-year-old opinion.”) He also said he couldn’t have gone to those intimate places without the musicians who’ve had a profound effect on him as an artist, including rapper Kid Cudi: “I’ve been inspired to do emotionally substantial work like Call Me by Your Name  because of an album like Man on the Moon,” he said. Lil B is another rapper that “I feel like some people might roll their eyes at,” Chalamet said, “but he really had a transformative effect on me when I was 15 and 16, preaching about live and let live, loving and accepting people for who they are.” Chalamet is such an acolyte that he once raised his hand at a public Q&A with Lil B and asked the rapper to knight him; he was beckoned to the stage, where Lil B had him drop down on one knee and then brought his forehead to Chalamet’s own. “There’s a video online of it,” said Chalamet, who then grinned. “It’s recognizably me. I’ll see if someone can find it.”


(UPDATE: They did, within half an hour: https://twitter.com/cmbynmafia/status/935911540930134017 )


His fans have already exhumed plenty of other Chalamet clips, including a treasure trove of rap videos that Chalamet performed as “Lil’ Timmy Tim” during his stint at LaGuardia, some of which went nearly as viral as his co-star Hammer’s jubilant dance scene in Call Me by Your Name. “You know, there was a certain relief in that,” he said. “The first reaction is obviously a big ‘Aww.’ But for better or worse, people know what a goofball I am now.” Still, Chalamet is particular about how he navigates social media. Hammer has quit Twitter more than once, and Chalamet understood how one could reach a breaking point. “You don’t want to expose yourself to it too much,” he said. “Even in the brief moments where you do swipe through your mentions a little bit, there could be, like, the errant mean thing that somebody said as a joke, and with most actors, there’s a sensitivity to these things.”

It helps that he has been too busy to fully indulge. The day after Call Me by Your Name ’s triumphant debut at the Sundance Film Festival in January, Chalamet auditioned to play Steve Carell’s drug-addicted son in the drama Beautiful Boy, then had to quickly drop 20 pounds from his already-slim frame to commit to that role through the summer. “It was a great way to digest how Call Me by Your Name  was being received, as a sidebar,” he said. “I was just trying to be disciplined and devoted to the work.” With that under his belt, and a Woody Allen film that Chalamet stars in but has not yet figured out how to address, he has begun preparing for his extensive Call Me by Your Name  publicity tour by studying early interviews of LeBron James and Jennifer Lawrence on YouTube. “When I go back and watch her early press kits, or even LeBron’s, I’m so impressed because they were so poised and well-spoken.” Has he ever run into the Hunger Games  star? “I did get to meet her once briefly,” Chalamet said, joking, “I camped out at a press line for Mother!

In the meantime, he’s trying to look on the bright side of fame, hoping that Call Me by Your Name  and his supporting role in Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird  will help him book more movies of that caliber. “The most humbling part of these experiences is realizing how ladder-oriented it is,” he said. “And that’s only fair. It’s a testament to gatekeeping, I guess, and you do have to earn your stripes.” Another potential perk: People will now have to learn how to spell his name correctly. “My mom’s two-decade exhale of relief!” he said. “On the projects I was working on when I was 12, 13, 14, she was sending many an email to non-obliging producers saying, ‘It’s not Timothy with a y, there’s an accent on the first ‘e,’ and the accent faces this way!’”

And then there’s the chance that one of his heroes might now admire him, too. As Chalamet and I walked out of his hotel room, I mentioned that the singer Frank Ocean, whose lyrics Chalamet frequently tweets, would almost certainly check out Call Me by Your Name  at some point. “You think he’s gonna see it?” Chalamet said. “Oh my God, that would be insane!”

He lurched into me, dizzy, and grabbed my arm for balance. “I’ve lost feeling,” he said, before mumbling with such excitement that I couldn’t even make out the words anymore.

Spoken like a true fan.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"