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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (Nov 24 2017) 0 Residents and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (Nov 24 2017)  (Read 19546 times)
Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #320 on: November 05, 2017, 11:25:41 am »










https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/call-me-by-your-name-original-motion-picture-soundtrack/id1300430864





Call Me By Your Name
(Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Various Artists
Soundtrack  Nov 3, 2017

1
Hallelujah Junction – 1st movement –
John Adams

7:09

2
M.A.Y. in the Backyard
Ryuichi Sakamoto

4:25

3
J'adore Venise
Loredana Bertè

4:15

4
Paris Latino
Bandolero

4:01

5
Sonatine Bureaucratique
Frank Glazer

3:44

6
“Zion hört die Wächter singen” from Cantata BWV 140 “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme”
Alessio Bax

5:10

7
Lady Lady Lady
Giorgio Moroder & Joe Esposito

4:15

8
Une barque sur l’océan from Miroirs
Andre Laplante

7:10

9
Futile Devices (Doveman Remix)
Sufjan Stevens

2:15

10
Germination
Ryuichi Sakamoto

2:09

11
Words
F.R. David

3:27

12
È la vita
Marco Armani

4:11

13
Mystery of Love
Sufjan Stevens

4:08

14
Radio Varsavia
Franco Battiato

4:07

15
Love My Way
The Psychedelic Furs

3:33

16
Le jardin féerique from Ma mère l'Oye
Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye

3:02

17
Visions of Gideon
Sufjan Stevens

4:07


This Compilation ℗ and © 2017 Madison Gate Records, Inc. All Rights Reserved.












https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGD9i718kBU

The Psychedelic Furs   Love My Way
PsychedelicFursVEVO


« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 08:07:07 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

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« Reply #321 on: November 06, 2017, 01:44:41 pm »

CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://daisy4ever.tumblr.com/

by Daisy.Q
Summer's Gone

by Daisy.Q http://daisy4ever.tumblr.com/



24th October 2017 80 Notes

#timothée chalamet  #elio  #elio perlman  #armie hammer  #oliver  #ulliva  #actor
#call me by your name  #cmbyn  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #lgbt
#movies  #film #lgbtmovie  #oscar
#art  #my art  #artist  #portrait  #drawing  #fanart  #Daisy.Q
#later!


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by Daisy.Q


  



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« Reply #322 on: November 06, 2017, 02:41:05 pm »

CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://marqslo.tumblr.com/

by mary / 19 / slytherin thunderbird



Twenty years was yesterday,
and yesterday was just earlier this morning,
and morning seemed light-years away.




Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armey Hammer



by mary / 19 / slytherin thunderbird http://marqslo.tumblr.com/



4th November 2017 223 Notes

#timothée chalamet  #elio  #elio perlman  #armie hammer  #oliver  #ulliva  #actor
#call me by your name  #cmbyn  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #lgbt
#movies  #film #lgbtmovie  #oscar  #laterpeaches 🍑
#art  #my art  #artist  #portrait  #drawing  #fanart
#artists on tumblr  #illustration  #trash
#later!


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by mary / 19 / slytherin thunderbird


  










by stang1996


Reading poetry (Paul Celan) on Monet's Berm
(can't wait to watch the film!)



CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by stang1996
https://stang1996.deviantart.com/

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« Reply #323 on: November 06, 2017, 03:35:04 pm »




More (visual) music--















FYI:
BC Records 12' -  Special Remix By Tee Scott & Began Cekic
For This English/French Version in 1982






And of course we've seen that particular pose before--


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« Reply #324 on: November 07, 2017, 08:52:13 am »





The movie takes place “somewhere in northern Italy,” but it’s actually set at the peak of Western civilization—which, in case you didn’t know it, was the summer of 1983. In the breezy villa of a beloved American professor of antiquities (Michael Stuhlbarg), multiple languages are spoken by a loving family. Plates of food are passed around along with side dishes of intellectual debate and affectionate teasing. Girls in sundresses pedal to the lake on bicycles. A brilliant pop song, the Psychedelic Furs’ “Love My Way,” throbs out of radios and on the dance floor. And brainy discussions of art history compete for time with more tangible pleasures (not just volleyball).




https://www.timeout.com/us/film/call-me-by-your-name




Sundance 2017
Call Me by Your Name
Sundance 2017 Review
In attaching sinuous style and casual sexiness to a universal ache, Luca Guadagnino
has come away with real wisdom. Sweet and salty, his movie burns like a suntan.

★★★★★
by JOSHUA ROTHKOPF 
@joshrothkopf

Wednesday 25 January 2017



Bearded and gentle, Stuhlbarg nails a compassionate paternal monologue that uncorks the movie’s entire reservoir of empathy in a single speech.
Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




This voluptuous coming-of-age gay romance transports us not only to northern Italy, but to a lazy summer's exchange of books, fruit, glances and power.

Italian writer-director Luca Guadagnino likes to show off his homeland as a place of sensual self-discovery. That's especially true of his last two fiction features, the exquisite Milanese romance I Am Love  (2009)—a film with the power to make you pack your bags and head off to the nearest airport—and the languorous island thriller A Bigger Splash  (2015). But he’s never mounted the total swirl of sultry weather, budding libidos and teenage confusion that marks his new drama, Call Me by Your Name, a triumphant, heartbreaking tale of coming out based on André Aciman’s acclaimed 2007 novel. When considered within the tradition of onscreen gay courtship, the movie takes its immediate place alongside such all-time greats as Brokeback Mountain, Carol  and the recent Moonlight. When viewed outside that esteemed lineage, Call Me by Your Name  has a choking emotional intensity that will be apparent to anyone who’s ever dared to reach out to another.

The movie takes place “somewhere in northern Italy,” but it’s actually set at the peak of Western civilization—which, in case you didn’t know it, was the summer of 1983. In the breezy villa of a beloved American professor of antiquities (Michael Stuhlbarg), multiple languages are spoken by a loving family. Plates of food are passed around along with side dishes of intellectual debate and affectionate teasing. Girls in sundresses pedal to the lake on bicycles. A brilliant pop song, the Psychedelic Furs’ “Love My Way,” throbs out of radios and on the dance floor. And brainy discussions of art history compete for time with more tangible pleasures (not just volleyball).

Swanning through this charmed universe like a little prince is thoughtful 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet, straddling the awkward age deftly), a musical prodigy who's often plugged into his Walkman, from which he transcribes piano etudes. (Guadagnino deploys the period details tactfully, always advancing the teen’s evolving mental state.) Elio has experienced these leisurely summers at the villa many times before, we gather, yet this time he is dumbstruck by the magnetism of Oliver (Armie Hammer), the chiseled, showboating grad student in tiny shorts flown out by his father for a season of research. Both young men share a Jewish heritage—Oliver wears a Star of David around his neck, while Elio’s family, he offers, are “Jews of discretion” per his mother—and both share a bathroom that begins to feels like a barrier.

Guadagnino makes films for adults. It’s partly why his work feels so vital in a moviescape filled with immaturity, and even as he turns up the heat on his central characters’ subtle—and mutual—flirtation, he never descends into ponderousness or straight-up comedy. The pressure gets released in a spectacular one-take seduction in a dusty plaza, the camera circling as Elio, uncertain of his purpose, his urges, his entire body, musters up his courage and Oliver struts just out of reach. Call Me by Your Name  is a playful film, but it trembles with a sense of impermanence, gorgeously developed as the summer’s shadows grow longer (cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom blesses the imagery with an atmosphere you can breathe) and the duo becomes more brazen with its affections.

That’s as good a taste as one should offer, and probably best left there. But Guadagnino has a breadth of feeling worth mapping out at the edges: Bearded and gentle, Stuhlbarg nails a compassionate paternal monologue that uncorks the movie’s entire reservoir of empathy in a single speech. (To have such dads in the world.) Meanwhile, an attic tryst between two shirtless men and a ripe peach will leave your crowd gasping. Those are two dramatic extremes that few directors would know what to do with, much less attempt. Guadagnino, though, like his countrymate and one-time documentary subject Bernardo Bertolucci, is up to the task. In attaching sinuous style and casual sexiness to a universal ache, Guadagnino has come away with real wisdom. Sweet and salty, his movie burns like a suntan.




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« Reply #325 on: November 08, 2017, 10:03:38 pm »


Timmy, I love you, but--
Great Aunt Agatha wants to
give you elocution lessons
for Christmas.
Oliver: “Is there anything you don't know?”
Elio: “I know nothing, Oliver.”

Oliver: “Well you seem to know more than anyone else around here.”
Elio: “If you only knew how little I know about things that matter.”

Oliver: “What things that matter?”
Elio: “You know what things."

Oliver: “Why are you telling me this?”
Elio: “Because I thought you should know?

Oliver: “Because you thought I should know?”
Elio: “Because I wanted you to know?
         Because I wanted you to know--
         Because I wanted you to know--
          Because I wanted you to know."





CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (2017)
ELIO AND OLIVER
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet

icecream forever
Published on Nov 7, 2017








Also FYI:



http://blog.afi.com/afi-fest-2017-timothee-chalamet-on-call-me-by-your-name/

AFI FEST 2017: Timothée Chalamet on CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
November 9, 2017


American Film Institute: One of the film’s centerpieces involves Elio and Oliver maneuvering around a statue, almost like a nervous dance, at once communicating and not communicating their feelings. Talk about blocking this scene.

Timothée Chalamet: We got to set, and there was this great monument in the middle of the square, and Luca gave us the direction to play the scene going around the monument, and then we blocked it out and there wasn’t enough track there that day to do the whole take in one shot, going up and down the side of the street. Luca went to the line producer and said we need more track, and Luca said we have to get this track and we’ll worry about the money later. We had about an hour to do it; we had two or three takes. Luca was very specific as related to that scene about this confession of love — he didn’t want to play in the close-up and see actors’ emotion. It only served some sort of human truth that a confession of love is often the moment we choose to be the most coy.










[Luca's] intuition about casting the duo paid off in more ways than he anticipated. Not only do Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer deliver two of this year’s most profound, sophisticated and moving performances, they also operated as true collaborators. Guadagnino fondly remembers the day they had to capture the film’s most challenging shot in a town square, a key moment when Elio first opens up to Oliver and confesses his feelings. In a single take that expands and widens on screen, we watch the duo as they approach a monument together and walk to its opposite sides while they continue to converse in a touching, cryptic fashion about their mutual attraction. Turns out the stunning shot was Armie Hammer’s idea. “We had five or six pages of dialogue. I was like, ‘Oh my god. How do we do this?’ Reverse angles and stuff. And then Armie said, ‘Why don't you do it in one shot?’ And I said, ‘One shot? Six pages of script? Okay! Let's start with blocking the scene: How do you come in, where do you go, where do you look around?’ After they acted the scene from the beginning to the end, I said, ‘I know what to do.’ We waited for two hours to get more tracks from Milan. Then we simply put it together and did it in an hour. So it's about collaboration. A great actor is not someone who goes into the trailer, waits for the shot and then goes back to the trailer. A great actor is someone who stays on set and becomes a filmmaker.”

http://www.filmjournal.com/features/sensual-summer-luca-guadagninos-call-me-your-name-captures-chemistry-attraction
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« Reply #326 on: November 08, 2017, 10:56:47 pm »





Producer Peter Spears quotes author Ayesha Siddiqi, who once advised, “Be the person you needed when you were younger.” Spears offers a variation of that: “We wanted to make the movie we needed as kids.”




http://variety.com/2017/film/awards/call-me-by-your-name-global-effort-1202607919/




Call Me by Your Name
“A lot of work, it was guerrilla filmmaking.”
A Global Effort to Create a Simple, Well-Told Tale

by Tim Gray
@timgray_variety

NOVEMBER 8, 2017 6:00AM PT



In subtle ways, the movie is radical. Even modern LGBT classics like “Brokeback Mountain,” “Carol" and “Moonlight” have positive depictions,
but their gay characters are all tortured by their urges. That’s not true for Elio: Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name




It takes a lot of work to make something simple. Exhibit A: “Call Me by Your Name,” the coming-of-age first romance of a 17-year-old American in 1983 Italy. “We had a little movie about the simplest story, yet it took a global effort of 10 years to get it across the finish line,” says producer Peter Spears.

He and fellow producer Howard Rosenman read the André Aciman novel in 2007 and quickly optioned it. The story centers on the romance of Elio and the 24-year-old Oliver, who’s working as his father’s assistant for a few months.

There were challenges even from the start. “Potential financiers didn’t understand the movie,” Spears says. Some worried “Nothing bad happens.” Spears would tell them, “That’s kind of the point.” He adds, “They would ask ‘Could we make the mother evil?’ or suggest, ‘The stakes need to be higher.’ I always said, ‘It’s about the human heart, how much higher could the stakes get?’ ”

Since the story spans a few months, “The movie could only be shot in summer in Italy,” Spears says. “If we lost shooting in summer, we had to wait a whole other year to get on the runway again.” Several times, a director and actors would commit but inevitably someone dropped out to take a bigger-paying job and the yearly wait began anew.

Shooting in Italy was a new experience for the producers, so early on, they contacted Luca Guadagnino, a longtime filmmaker who heads production company Frenesy Films. He started out as an advisor on the project.

Emilie Georges from Memento in France understood the material right away. She and Rodrigo Teixera from RT from Brazil — two artist-driven companies — immediately said, “We want to make that movie.”

The producers sought advice from James Ivory, the Berkeley-born filmmaker whose biggest hits were period pieces based on literary novels. Ivory started out as an executive producer and ended up writing a new screenplay.

Guadagnino’s involvement deepened and his schedule cleared, allowing him to direct. “When we had the right people, the movie started to happen,” says Spears. The pre-production in Crema, in Lombardy, was fast because Guadagnino lives there and knew the area well. He constantly added personal touches, like bringing plates, paintings and linens from his own home.

He set the tone for production, as the intimate film is filled with details and layers that create the right mood and texture. “Luca’s sensibility was the missing piece. Now, I can’t imagine anyone else doing it. In every frame of that movie is Luca’s touch,” says Spears.

It became a global effort, with a team representing America, Italy, France, Brazil, Thailand and England, among other countries. “It was guerrilla filmmaking,” says Spears.

Sony Pictures Classics bought the film on the eve of the January 2017 Sundance, and the festgoers’ reaction proved it was worth the wait; the audience was stunned by the movie’s simple warmth and sensuality. The film enjoyed equal success at the Berlin festival.

The movie, like Aciman’s novel, captures the tenderness, excitement and heartache of a first love, which comes with the knowledge that it’s never going to be as intense again.

In subtle ways, the movie is radical. Even modern LGBT classics like “Brokeback Mountain,” “Carol” and “Moonlight” have positive depictions, but their gay characters are all tortured by their urges. That’s not true for Elio.

This alone makes “Call Me” important in terms of gay cinema, but it’s more universal than that. Audiences of all sexual persuasions and ages are relating to the film’s emotional honesty and heart.

Spears quotes author Ayesha Siddiqi, who once advised, “Be the person you needed when you were younger.” Spears offers a variation of that: “We wanted to make the movie we needed as kids.”




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« Reply #327 on: November 08, 2017, 11:20:42 pm »

 Peter Spears
                                       @pjspears


3:30 PM - 7 Nov 2017
26 Retweets 132 Likes


https://twitter.com/pjspears?lang=en&lang=en
https://twitter.com/pjspears/status/928042008953761793

Thank you for the beautiful cover story, Elle Decor. You can read all about the 17th century Italian villa from Call Me By Your Name in the December issue, online now and on newsstands next week. #postedfrommybathroom











SORRY I just keeping mentioning this AGAIN, but--






--and this--






--and this--






--and etc.!


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« Reply #328 on: November 09, 2017, 11:40:33 am »

 Peter Spears
                                       @pjspears


3:47 PM - 7 Nov 2017
9 Retweets 45 Likes


https://twitter.com/pjspears?lang=en&lang=en
https://twitter.com/pjspears/status/928046278998614018


The ancient villa in North Italy almost outshines Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer.



TOUR THE 17TH-CENTURY ITALIAN VILLA
IN DIRECTOR LUCA GUADAGNINO’S
'CALL ME BY YOUR NAME'

The Lombardian Villa Albergoni propels — and rivals — the intimacy of
Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in one of this year's richest films.


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« Reply #329 on: November 09, 2017, 01:19:25 pm »






The ancient villa in North Italy almost outshines Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer.



TOUR THE 17TH-CENTURY ITALIAN VILLA
IN DIRECTOR LUCA GUADAGNINO’S
'CALL ME BY YOUR NAME'

The Lombardian Villa Albergoni propels — and rivals — the intimacy of
Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in one of this year's richest films.






Luca Guadagnino likes houses. The 46-year-old Italian director has a history of lavishing homes in his films with the same love he gives his human characters. It could be argued that Guadagnino’s choice of Villa Necchi as the imposing temple of beauty in his 2009 masterpiece I Am Love  was as important as his casting of Tilda Swinton. And 2015’s A Bigger Splash  relies on the den of iniquity on the island of Pantelleria in which its protagonists pursue their misbegotten fates.




The piano and slipcovered furniture in the Perlmans’ living room.



In the opening sequence of Call Me By Your Name, the third film in his “desire trilogy” and based on the acclaimed 2007 novel by André Aciman, we watch rangy 17-year-old Elio Perlman (played by Timothée Chalamet) emptying a large wooden armoire full of clothes in a bedroom of his family’s Lombardian home. Moments later, after observing from his window the arrival of Oliver (Armie Hammer), an American grad student tasked with assisting Elio’s professor father with his summer research, Elio leads him to the now-vacated sleeping quarters (he himself stays in a smaller adjacent chamber), explaining, “My room is now your room. I’ll be next door. We have to share a bathroom — it’s my only way out.”





The remnants of a meal in the kitchen.



Incidentally, the lavatory in question — a pale blue–tiled 1930s-style space — becomes more a way in than an escape: It is through the bathroom one morning that Elio spies Oliver’s perky, naked behind as he changes into swimming trunks, igniting a latent sexual charge that blossoms over the course of the movie into a tentatively passionate and moving affair.










The expansive vestibule of Villa Albergoni.




Set in 1983 in the Villa Albergoni, a former fortress converted into a 17th-century home in the Lombardian town of Moscazzano, Call Me By Your Name  is a story of first love and of the deep bonds between members of the French-Italian-American-Jewish Perlman family. And the home and interiors in which these narratives unfold are at once catalysts for and extensions of their inhabitants’ emotions. The connective infrastructure of the sky-hued bathroom, for example, drives the psyches of its protagonists.





The exterior of Villa Albergoni.



On the eve of the movie’s New York Film Festival premiere at Lincoln Center, I met Guadagnino, Aciman, and set decorator Violante Visconti di Modrone for an intimate chat, during which it became abundantly clear that such design decisions were crucial in propelling the story’s emotional narrative.





Rumpled sheets in one of the bedrooms.



“I wanted an anticipation that someone might walk in unannounced or uninvited or unexpected and create a sense of suspense,” says Aciman of his novel, in which Elio’s and Oliver’s bedrooms are connected via a balcony. “In a strange way,” adds Guadagnino, “I think the bathroom is even stronger [than the balcony], because it brings a degree of intimacy — emotional and physiological nudity.”





Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) enters the Villa Albergoni vestibule.



In fact, when Aciman was writing his book, his entry point was not Elio or Oliver or even Elio’s father and mother, a Greco-Roman professor and translator, respectively. It was a light-dappled, arched-balconied building surrounded by wild gardens in an 1884 Monet painting whose image arrested him and whose provenance he uncovered as Bordighera, a small town on the Italian Riviera.





Elio and Oliver resolve an argument with help from a statue's arm.



“The villa in the Monet. The vision of the house. I loved the house, and I wanted to people it. I had no idea who was going to be in it,” explains Aciman, whose abiding fear when the film was being made (James Ivory penned the screenplay) was that the environs would be too beautiful. “That’s one of the things I was scared of: that the movie was going to be lush, the house was going to be lush.”





Elio and Oliver (Armie Hammer) bike to town.




This is not an altogether surprising concern given the richness that tends to characterize Guadagnino’s cinematic landscapes. Villa Necchi’s starkly delineated hauteur (not to mention Swinton’s wardrobe, which was designed by Raf Simons for Jil Sander) was the stuff of Italian Brutalist dreams, while the ancient dammuso, or one-story stone home, in A Bigger Splash  (situated in the eco-resort of Tenuta Borgia) was a cosmopolite’s paradise.





A statue seen on a trip to an archaeological site in Lake Garda.



The Perlmans are, as Guadagnino puts it, “neither stuffy nor rich people,” and their home needed to convey that. Fortunately, in Guadagnino’s and Visconti di Modrone’s hands, Villa Albergoni is the perfectly imperfect realization of the Perlmans’ Italian existence, a place that is at once grand in scale and intimate and rumpled in feel.





A clock tower in the the town of Crema.




Guadagnino’s own apartment—a space he meticulously renovated, uncovering original frescoes and terra-cotta bricks—is in a 17th-century palazzo in Crema, a 15-minute drive from Moscazzano. Besides the obvious convenience of picking a location near his residence (his production team, editing studio, and offices are in the same building), the enclosed surroundings of Villa Albergoni reminded him of the landscapes of Bernardo Bertolucci films, “these countries where you don’t have a horizon other than the trees and the little lawns and the streams of water,” he says. Such a setting was well suited to the Perlmans’ duality of intellectual precocity and unstudied ease.





Elio transcribing a piece of music.



“I wanted to immerse the characters in something without a horizon that could [show] what is ahead of you. I wanted something more present and in the now,” he says of moving away from the book’s coastal setting.





The library of Villa Albergoni, site of the Perlman family home.



“Luca wanted this austere home to become a very loved home for the Perlman family,” adds Visconti di Modrone, the grandniece of the director Luchino Visconti. “We had to transform this austerity, putting inside elements of the everyday, giving us ideas of how the Perlmans were multicultural people, and very open-minded, who loved books, music, and art.”

And so the living room (whose original incarnation was, in Guadagnino’s words, “a sad and really uninteresting room”) became, thanks to Visconti di Modrone, an inviting repository. Italian by nationality but born in Singapore, she added a global influence, covering much of the furniture in Indian and Southeast Asian cotton fabrics (some from her own personal collection, and some from friends’ families whom she felt bore a resemblance to the Perlmans), including a cozy, blue and white–patterned example covering the sofa on which Elio and his parents curl up in a tangle of legs and arms for a reading one night.






Elio heading downstairs.




A turn-of-the-20th-century piano is the site of both Elio’s virtuosic performances for his family and a fiery, flirtatious series of arrangements of an early Bach piece he plays for Oliver. On the walls hang a mix of maps from the famous Stamperia Perini print store in Verona and 18th-century Japanese paintings from an antiques store in Milan called Piva.

Maps from Perini and Piva also pepper Mr. Perlman’s library, an enveloping womb of a space that is, fittingly, the site of a pivotal scene in which father and son have a heartfelt discussion of Elio’s relationship with Oliver. Visconti di Modrone retained the space’s original dusty-rose sofa (“It gives the sensation of coziness and shabby chic that is right for the library — you feel that people stood and worked there,” she notes) but covered the walls in a gorgeous rust-inflected brocade from the fabric company Dedar, with whom Guadagnino also collaborated for his forthcoming horror film Suspiria. As a nod to Mr. Perlman’s profession, she layered the brocade with antique cameos of Lombardian kings and filled the shelves with flea-market tomes on Greco-Roman sculpture.






Mafalda, the Perlmans' cook and housekeeper, in the kitchen.




Such intense attention to detail imbues even the most seemingly mundane touches with clues to the characters’ lives. The walls of Elio’s room (now slept in by Oliver) are papered with 1980s posters for La Biennale and a Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition, a nod to his casually cultured upbringing. The aged tumblers from which Mr. Perlman sips his whiskey belonged to Visconti di Modrone’s father, Barnabò Visconti di Modrone. The table where the Perlmans enjoy breakfast alfresco sports a plastic checkered tablecloth to which Visconti di Modrone added patches and discoloration to make it look worn (the plates and saucers she sourced, again, from friends so they would have a lived-in feel).





The aftermath of an alfresco meal.




“It’s a house that accepts the passage of time, that accepts what you do. It’s all fine, and it’s welcoming, and it’s warm,” observes Aciman. “You can’t get away from that feeling of warmth that this family exudes, and it’s in the house.”





The Perlmans’ gardener tends to a fruit tree.



That same sentiment takes on a more carnal, visceral quality outdoors. After all, it is in nature that we are likely to abandon the social strictures that bind us to our tidy roles. A garden doesn’t yield to one’s body the way, say, a slipcovered sofa might. But it can inspire the fantasies that fuel our actions. And so Guadagnino and Visconti di Modrone’s mutual friend Gaia Chaillet Giusti (who also worked with Guadagnino on A Bigger Splash) injected life into Villa Albergoni’s dying but classic giardina Italiana  schema; she added apricot trees (whose juice the Perlmans sip at breakfast) and peach trees (whose luscious fruit inspires Elio in a particularly intimate sexual scene).





Oliver’s 1983 Converse sneakers at a disco in Moscazzano.




And art director Roberta Federico built the trough (a de facto swimming pool where Elio’s and Oliver’s glistening bodies play cat and mouse), sourcing recycled stone from the nearby Bianchessi warehouse and painting it to look 300 years old.

“The idea that a family like that would have a pool in a place like that was alien — it would have been nouveau riche,” notes Guadagnino of choosing an unconventional watering hole. “And I had a tragic pool in I Am Love.”






Mr. and Mrs Perlman lounge outside.



The director’s particular, obsessive approach to creating living, breathing places is an offshoot, in part, of his frustration with “how irritatingly narrow Italian cinema looked in the ’80s.” As a young man seduced by the power of and deeply immersive feel to mid-20th-century Italian films, he understands how crucial a setting is to a narrative and the people therein.

“We tell stories, and those stories must happen in the space. Because we are not the product of, say, a piece of dialogue. The character must be a product of the behavior and interaction of the space,” explains Guadagnino. “So for me, space is everything.”


This story originally appeared in the December 2017 issue of ELLE DECOR.






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