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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017) 0 Residents and 5 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 98977 times)
Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #540 on: February 10, 2018, 10:37:49 am »

 원1AM   ‏‏
                                       @1AM_already2


1:29 AM - 24 Jan 2018
25 Retweets 50 Likes


https://twitter.com/1AM_already2
https://twitter.com/1AM_already2/status/956096609347129344


로마에 간 콜바넴팀 A call to Rome













AND YOU KNOW WHY  THEY WERE THERE??

BECAUSE:






ITALY, at long last!

 Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked
 Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy


CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
RELEASE DATES


UK             27 October 2017   
Ireland       27 October 2017   
USA           24 November 2017   (New York and Los Angeles)*   
Canada       8 December 2017   
Thailand    14 December 2017   (limited)
Sweden     22 December 2017
USA          22 December 2017  (Boston, Philadelphia, Minneapolis & etc.)*   
Australia    26 December 2017
Netherlands 11 January 2018
Taiwan      12 January 2018
USA          12 January 2018     (Detroit and Indianapolis)*   
Brazil        18 January 2018
Portugal    18 January 2018
Estonia      19 January 2018
USA          19 January 2018     (NATIONWIDE)*
Italy          25 January 2018
Finland      26 January 2018
Norway     26 January 2018
Poland      26 January 2018
Spain        26 January 2018
Philippines 31 January 2018    (Ayala Malls Cinemas - select)
Denmark   1 February 2018
Greece      8 February 2018
Hungary    8 February 2018
Romania    9 February 2018
France      28 February 2018
Hong Kong 1 March 2018
Germany    1 March 2018
Switzerland 1 March 2018      (German Speaking Region)
Czechia     22 March 2018
S. Korea    22 March 2018
Japan        27 April 2018


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5726616/releaseinfo?linkId=43379176





« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 05:06:22 am by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #541 on: February 10, 2018, 07:28:31 pm »





Oh, he's good!!
Why I Love CALL ME BY YOUR NAME



TheBookTuber
Published on Jan 9, 2018


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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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« Reply #542 on: February 11, 2018, 11:42:32 am »



https://www.wsj.com/articles/director-luca-guadagnino-on-call-me-by-your-name-his-most-heartfelt-film-yet-1511280648


Director Luca Guadagnino on
Call Me by Your Name
His Most Heartfelt Film Yet
Over the course of his career, the Italian auteur has proven himself a
master of desire and elegance. With his latest film, he reaches for utopia
by Ned Beauman
Nov. 21, 2017 11:10 a.m. ET



WILD SIDE Luca Guadagnino at his apartment, part of a restored 17th-century palazzo, in northern Italy.    PHOTO: BROOMBERG & CHANARIN



A FIRST-TIME visitor to director Luca Guadagnino’s home in northern Italy will likely wander around in search of a swimming pool. There has to be a pool somewhere. Throughout the director’s work, pools are wellsprings of human drama and forever murky with sex and danger—from the hedonistic teenage pool party that opens Melissa P. (2005), to the corpses fished out of pools in both I Am Love  (2009) and A Bigger Splash  (2015), to the trunks that the love-struck protagonist of his new film Call Me by Your Name  pulls over his head to inhale their scent. If you believe these films, any day that goes by without at least a quick dip is incomplete. So where is Guadagnino’s pool?

“I can’t swim!” Guadagnino, 46, confesses. “If you throw me in the water and I can’t touch the ground, I would drown. A few years ago I tried [to learn], and after one lesson the trainer said to me, ‘You’re a desperate case, I can’t do any more. Go.’ ” On a conscious level, he says, the aquatic motif in his films is mere coincidence. “But my unconscious is alive and kicking, and I think it wants me to deal with water. I defy my fears in cinema, but not in reality.”

Guadagnino almost didn’t make Call Me by Your Name, which was released nationwide last month, because he was reluctant to return to the world of “rich people lounging in the ennui of summer”—it felt like one swimming pool too many. Even the critics championing his films have acknowledged that one of the chief pleasures of his work is the opportunity to bask in this over-the-top vision of life. I Am Love, for instance, was shot in the Villa Necchi Campiglio, a seminal rationalist mansion in Milan; its star, frequent Guadagnino collaborator Tilda Swinton, wore costumes created by Raf Simons for Jil Sander; on-screen meals were conceptualized by chef Carlo Cracco of the double-Michelin-starred-restaurant Cracco; extras for the party scenes were recruited from Milan high society.






Guadagnino at home.    PHOTO: BROOMBERG & CHANARIN




At first glance one has trouble distinguishing between Guadagnino-world onscreen and Guadagnino-world at home. His apartment, part of a restored 17th-century palazzo in the town of Crema, is 90 percent perfection and 10 percent achingly perfect imperfections, like the flaky green paint he chose to leave almost untouched on the ceilings that vault overhead, or the antique church candlesticks permitted to lean at a precipitous angle toward the cashmere-upholstered couch. Armie Hammer, one of the stars of Call Me by Your Name, describes Guadagnino as “the most epicurean human being I’ve ever experienced: his house, his food, the way he walks, the way he talks, the way he wears clothes, the way he looks at things.”

But Guadagnino denies that such trappings are really so essential to him, either in his life or in his work. “I could be perfectly happy on the street,” he insists, even if he knows that won’t sound very credible to those who might dismiss him as, in his own words, “a posh sort of director who indulges in beauty and luxury.” He speculates that the next project he embarks on could be about a family living in public housing; and indeed his forthcoming remake of Dario Argento’s 1977 horror classic, Suspiria, which transplants the story to a dour Berlin, promises no scenes of high-end interior design (and no swimming pools either). “I don’t want to be thought of as a fascist of beauty.”

Guadagnino decided to become a director at 8 years old because he wanted to make horror films. “So in a way Suspiria  is my debut,” he says, “because it’s the debut of my desires as a child. This is a homage not to Dario Argento but to the emotions that Dario Argento made in me. I don’t want to make people jump—I want them to feel overwhelmed.” Born in Palermo in 1971, Guadagnino spent his early childhood in Ethiopia, where his father worked as a teacher. When he was 5, the family moved back to Sicily, and his father provided what Guadagnino calls his “bad education,” taking him to films like Suspiria and Psycho and Apocalypse Now and Lawrence of Arabia. “They had a huge impact on me,” he says. “They forged a sense of excess.” He pestered his mother into buying him a Super 8 camera. Later, he chose not to train at film school, but instead studied film theory at the Sapienza University of Rome and began making shorts and documentaries.

His first full-length film, The Protagonists, made when he was 27, today seems wildly ahead of its time: It’s a meta-theatrical true-crime documentary long before Kate Plays Christine  and Casting JonBenet. Perhaps if it came out now it would find an enthusiastic audience on Netflix, or perhaps it’s too daring for that; not many directors would put wrenching interviews with the parents of a murder victim in the same film as gratuitous nudity and a blooper reel. By contrast, his fourth, Melissa P., an adaptation of the erotic novel 100 Strokes of the Brush Before Bed, feels thoroughly generic. “I was really embarrassed with how it turned out,” Guadagnino says, and it forever altered his approach to directing. “Studios often fear directors, and in that case they just didn’t want to give me any power. I edited the film the way I wanted, but they dismantled it. I was less assured, and I didn’t have a producer who was able to defend me. And that’s why I started producing my own movies after Melissa P.  After that, I never allowed anybody else to step in the way of doing movies the way I wanted.”

I Am Love  represented a remarkable turnaround. Guadagnino and Swinton conceived the film entirely on their own terms, and the result was a tour de force. In the U.S., it was nominated for a Golden Globe for best foreign language film and earned $5 million at the box office (which in art film terms is a hit). Although it looks extravagant, it was made on a relatively tight budget; Guadagnino has told a story about the actress Alba Rohrwacher eating tinier and tinier bites of a yellow Ladurée macaron in each take because they couldn’t afford a replacement box.






SWEET ESCAPE A selection of some of Guadagnino’s films. From left:
“The Protagonists” (1999), “Melissa P.” (2005), “I Am Love” (2009).

PHOTO: EVERETT COLLECTION





A Bigger Splash” (2015) and “Call Me by Your Name” (2017).
PHOTO: EVERETT COLLECTION




It was only after I Am Love  that Guadagnino finally had the courage to move away from Rome. “I was really unhappy there, but I had this idea that being a director meant being in Rome because that’s where the Italian cinema industry is,” he explains. “I Am Love  gave me the confidence to see world cinema, and not Italian cinema, as my playground.” He had always felt like an outsider in the capital. “The Italian critics have been not very nice to me as a filmmaker. They lash my films, never giving them any space. But it’s OK. I’m past that. I don’t do movies that work within the rules of Italian cinema. But I am not too defiant. I am just myself.” When asked what rules he is breaking, Guadagnino suggests that his films are too operatic for Italy. Which might sound rather paradoxical to non-Italians, but as Guadagnino sees it, the melodramatic spirit of Rossellini, Bertolucci and Antonioni was nearly stamped out by the conservative turn Italian culture took in the 1980s. In his films, he does what he can to keep that spirit alive.

Call Me by Your Name, set in 1983, is an adaptation of André Aciman’s novel about the love affair between a 17-year-old boy (played in the film by Timothée Chalamet) and a postgraduate student (Armie Hammer) who comes to stay with his family for the summer. At first, Guadagnino was planning to help the producers out only with some location scouting, but with no other director yet in place, “I started to fantasize with my friend James Ivory about what could have been our version of the film.” Alongside Oscar-nominated films like The Remains of the Day and A Room With a View, Ivory’s filmography as a director includes 1987’s Maurice, one of the first times a gay love story was depicted in a prestige movie. After resolving to work together on the project, Guadagnino and Ivory went to meet Aciman. “I had heard horrible stories about what directors do to books, so I was a bit nervous,” Aciman says. “But they understood the book. I felt confident in Luca’s point of view.” Aciman ended up playing a cameo role in the film as one half of an older gay couple who come over for lunch.

One change Guadagnino did make was to transplant the story from the Ligurian seaside to Crema, which gave him the chance to film some scenes in the courtyard downstairs from his apartment and others in the Piazza del Duomo around the corner. In the evenings, he occasionally cooked dinner for his actors in his own kitchen. “To shoot a movie that deals with that tone, while simultaneously living in that tone, was incredible,” Hammer says. “I contemplated never making another movie again—it’s all downhill from here.”





‘I don’t want to be thought of as a fascist of beauty.’
—Luca Guadagnino




After the film’s premiere at January’s Sundance Film Festival, critics hailed Call Me by Your Name  as a landmark in the canon of queer cinema. Guadagnino allows the straightforward story—a summer romance with none of the contrived obstacles we have come to expect from the genre—to sprawl out over a running time of more than two hours. “You may remember the moment in which you finally got to spend an evening close to the girl or the boy you really were coveting for months, and the gazes became more insistent, the first moment of touch was a thrill and the conversations went on forever? You need breathing time to indulge in that kind of emotional flow,” says Guadagnino. This is especially palpable in a scene where Chalamet’s character Elio yearningly observes Hammer’s character Oliver as he dances to the pop music of Guadagnino’s youth at an outdoor disco. “I remember many, many parties and discos where I was sitting on a chair just looking at people dancing,” says Guadagnino, who is gay. “That’s the most personal autobiographical moment in the film, when Elio is gazing. And then he gets involved. I used not to.”

In the middle of our conversation, Guadagnino goes into the kitchen and returns with a plate of apricots and cherries. He could scarcely have chosen a more appropriate, not to say provocative, snack, because Call Me by Your Name  is suffused with the scent of stone fruit: There is not only a detailed discussion of the etymology of apricot, but also an unforgettable sequence in which Chalamet’s character pleasures himself with a peach and afterward Hammer’s character tastes it.







Director Luca Guadagnino at his home in Crema, Italy.    PHOTO: BROOMBERG & CHANARIN




It wasn’t Guadagnino’s intention to scandalize his audience. “The way we show the sex scenes, it’s tender, it’s unmorbid, it’s as natural as the water in the pond. I hope that anyone who sees this movie with their children or with their parents will not feel embarrassed.” Guadagnino is eager for families to watch the film together because he believes there is so much for them to take away from it. At the heart of Call Me By Your Name  is his enduring interest in “how people can teach you things, and how you learn, and how you swap positions, and when you grow up your parents need you, but when you were younger you needed them.” The single most moving scene may be a monologue by Michael Stuhlbarg, playing Elio’s father, in which he counsels his son on heartbreak. “That’s what drove me to make the film: How do we represent this invisible, beautiful transmission of knowledge that is a force between generations?”

To get across what he’s trying to accomplish with his work, Guadagnino quotes the philosopher Slavoj Žižek. What we learn from true love, Žižek writes, is “not to mystify the existing reality, to paint it with false colors, but quite the contrary: to summon up the strength to translate the sublime (utopian) vision into everyday practice—in short, to practice utopia.” In Guadagnino’s films, an afternoon around the swimming pool can become a kind of paradise, but not just because the weather is good and the peaches are ripe; rather, because it’s a zone of feeling where what he calls “a revolutionary happy ending” can be fought for and won. “All my characters are running away from illusion and aiming for something ungraspable,” he says. “But it’s not only the characters. I hope the movie can have a transformative essence for the viewer. I think that’s wonderful. I think that’s utopian.”


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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #543 on: February 12, 2018, 05:57:08 pm »




And FYI:






Peter Spears‏ @pjspears  Aug 13
https://twitter.com/pjspears
Producer, "Call Me By Your Name"

The day it all began--the table read of CMBYN script.

#victoiredubois #amiracasar @RealChalamet me #lucaguadagnino @armiehammer #michaelstuhlbarg






http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5726616/fullcredits/

Armie Hammer   ...          Oliver
Timothée Chalamet   ...          Elio          
Michael Stuhlbarg   ...         Mr. Perlman
Amira Casar   ...            Annella
Esther Garrel   ...           Marzia
Victoire Du Bois   ...       Chiara
                          Andre Aciman   ...        Mounir (as André Aciman)
                  Peter Spears   ...         Isaac (and Producer)

Luca Guadagnino   ...     Director




But of course we know where that fabulous loggia with the refectory table is located--












The director Luca Guadagnino’s exquisitely art-directed movies have become something of an obsession among interior designers.
But his ultimate set is his own apartment in a 17th-century palazzo outside of Milan. The property had been empty for 40 years before
Guadagnino spent six months renovating it. With the help of painters, he created custom paint colors for each room.















Light floods the loggia, on the second floor of the palazzo. Gio Ponti Superleggera chairs by Cassina flank the dining table,
with vintage Danish chairs in the foreground. The ornately painted door is original to the building. Credit Mikael Olsson





https://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2016/08/01/t-magazine/luca-guadagnino-milan-home-interior-design/s/01tmag-luca-slide-OM18.html

Guadagnino in front of a distressed mirrored panel of his design [in the Dining Room]. Photo: Mikael Olsson





https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/01/t-magazine/luca-guadagnino-home-italy-interior-design.html

In the living room of the director Luca Guadagnino’s apartment in a 17th-century palazzo, furniture by Piero Castellini
and 18th-century Japanese painted panels. Photo: Mikael Olsson
[/color]





https://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2016/08/01/t-magazine/luca-guadagnino-milan-home-interior-design/s/01tmag-luca-slide-Y3DH.html

In the living room, the original frescoed ceiling and terracotta tiles uncovered during renovation,
sofa and chairs by Piero Castellini covered in C&C Milano fabrics and a La Manufacture Cogolin rug.
Guadagnino worked with the painters to hand-mix the color of the walls.





https://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2016/08/01/t-magazine/luca-guadagnino-milan-home-interior-design/s/01tmag-luca-slide-FTK4.html

In the dining room, chairs by Enzo Mari for Hermès, 19th-century church candlesticks mounted as lamps and a La Manufacture Cogolin rug.
On the sideboard, a 1920s porcelain dog by Gio Ponti for Richard Ginori and Hermès glasses.





A Tibetan tapestry hangs over a Hästens bed in the master bedroom, with Castellini chairs covered in Dedar fabric and
curtains of Hermès fabric. Photo: Mikael Olsson





https://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2016/08/01/t-magazine/luca-guadagnino-milan-home-interior-design/s/01tmag-luca-slide-VBRX.html

A fishtail palm with a backdrop of Farrow & Ball wallpaper in the black bathroom.
Photo: Mikael Olsson










https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/01/t-magazine/luca-guadagnino-home-italy-interior-design.html




One Italian Filmmaker’s
Ultimate Set — His Own Home

Luca Guadagnino conjures a world of dark beauty in his films,
and in his apartment in a 17th-century palazzo outside of Milan.

By DANA THOMAS
AUG. 1, 2016




“I hate the concept of beauty for the sake of it. It is overrated,” says the Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino. This might sound odd coming from the creator of such movies as 2009’s I Am Love  and this year’s A Bigger Splash,  each filled with ravishing, fashionable people moving through exquisitely appointed, haute bourgeois settings — a style that could be described as high aesthete with latent passions lurking beneath. “Environment is essential. I like anything that has to do with form and space,” says Guadagnino. “But I am also a humanist [with] a very strong love and attraction for character. That’s the mixture.”

What he strives for, says his friend and frequent collaborator, the actress Tilda Swinton, is something “vital, passionate and uncontrollable.” These aspirations play out in his home as well, with each atmospheric room telling a story, much as his sets amplify his characters. Grand and simple, perfect and imperfect, harmony emerges from contrast and unlikely pairings, like modern Danish chairs in a room with doors lavishly embellished in the Lombardian Baroque style. “Spare functional furniture, in my opinion, is the genius of 20th-century design,” Guadagnino says. He adds, only half joking: “My secret desire is to be an interior designer. I’d love to make houses for rich clients who can afford to do things right.”

His calling card could be his 3,200-square-foot apartment, on the second floor of a 17th-century palazzo that sits in the heart of Crema, a city 40 minutes from Milan. When Guadagnino bought the place a few years ago, it had been empty for 40 years — since the countess who lived there died. It had “broken windows, a lot of dead pigeons and rotten wallpaper,” he says.

The renovation took six months, and Guadagnino was onsite “every day, directing the workers,” he says. After all, “I am a director.” What he discovered beneath layers of decaying wallpaper and bright midcentury paint was every palazzo owner’s dream: authentic frescoes. Ripping up the 1950s cement tiles revealed the original terracotta bricks, now cleaned and buffed. When a false ceiling was torn out in the kitchen, a 17th-century painted wood bench, now in Guadagnino’s bedroom, was found in a crawl space. He worked with the painters to mix pigment for the precise hues in each room; it took four tries to get the dining room right, from kelly green to the final slate gray. For the living room’s boiserie, he chose a navy that, depending on the hour of the day, can seem black. “The bedroom was easy,” he says. “I was eating a date, a beautiful brown, and I said to the painter, Do this color. It’s like being in the center of a huge date.”

In an office that doubles as a guest bedroom, he writes his scripts at one of two side-by-side leather desks. (His partner of seven years, also an Italian filmmaker, sits at the other.) Guadagnino, who has acquired other apartments in the building, has effectively turned much of it into his moviemaking compound. His production team works in a ground-floor suite that opens onto the cobblestone courtyard-cum-parking lot; he edits his films in a studio just above them. The actors in his films, lodged in nearby B&Bs, zoom over on bicycles and watch movies on a screen mounted to a wall in the regal living room. Doors always seem open; friends and assistants freely wander in and out, careful to avoid disturbing the few families still living in the other wing. “A good creative place,” the director says.

Guadagnino’s appreciation for incongruity began when he was a child and continued through his education. A month after he was born in Palermo, in 1971, his family moved to Ethiopia, where his Sicilian father taught history and Italian, returning home when Luca was 6. While at the University of Palermo, where he studied literature, he met Patrizia Allegra, a fixture of Sicily’s cultural scene. She would bring the then-19-year-old cinephile (with a particular fondness for Ingmar Bergman) along to dinner parties. At one, Guadagnino recalls, Allegra introduced him to the filmmakers Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet. “Patrizia said: ‘Oh, Monsieur Straub, Luca wants to be a director. What is your advice? Should he go to film school?’ Straub looked at me and said, ‘If you want to be a director then you are a film director. You don’t need to go to school. Don’t.’ ”

So he didn’t. Instead, Guadagnino moved to Rome and finished his degree in literature and cinema history at Sapienza University. While there he met Laura Betti, the muse of Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini. “I approached her in complete naïveté, and she said, ‘Come visit me,’ and we became friends — this big, nasty lady and this very skinny young man,” he says with a laugh. “I could cook very well, so she used me a lot — ‘You have to come now because I have guests!’ Everybody from Bernardo Bertolucci to Valerio Adami, the painter — these big personalities, together. That was my film school.”

Guadagnino eventually found his own muse in the film Caravaggio,  directed by the British experimental filmmaker Derek Jarman. “I saw Tilda playing Lena,” he says. “I thought: Ahhh.” He eagerly sought out her films, and by the time Sally Potter’s Orlando  came out in 1992, “I was obsessed.”

He wrote a script for a short film called The Penny Arcade Peepshow,  inspired by William S. Burroughs’s writings, and sent a letter to Swinton, via her agent, asking if she’d star in it. He never heard back. A few months later he read that she was in Rome for an event. He went and “was staring at her like a stalker. Staring!” Guadagnino says, clearly amused by his youthful gaucherie. “After one hour, she said, ‘What can I do for you?’ ”

Somehow he convinced her to be in his film, and he pulled together money for her business-class ticket from London and kicked out his roommates so she could stay in his flat. “She was incredibly cool. The coolest,” he says. “After three days, she said, ‘We are going to be partners in crime and the crime is cinema.’ And we have become that.”

They never finished the film — he ran out of money. But she agreed to appear in his first feature, The Protagonists,  which he now dismisses as a learning experience. Later she starred in I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash.  The former film established Guadagnino’s mature style, both as a filmmaker and a creator of environments of melancholic glamour. “Polished and refined are the last words I would use to describe his work, and I mean that as a high compliment,” Swinton says. “There is nothing smoothed away, hidden or suppressed. Rather, a proper rawness of sensibility and pulse, something pagan, profoundly wild.”

I Am Love  is shot in the architect Piero Portaluppi’s masterpiece, the Villa Necchi Campiglio in Milan, and it is as much a star of the film as Swinton. Portaluppi, the Italian Modernist architect of choice to society in the 1920s and ’30s, was an obsessive perfectionist, much like Guadagnino. “We have no bedside tables because I can’t find any that I like yet,” he says. “My partner wants to kill me!”

The passionate cook had better luck in the kitchen, with a fishmonger’s stone sink from Genoa and a large cheese-maker’s table from a nearby village. The shelves are packed with international cookbooks. “I like to host — a lot,” he says.

Dinner parties are staged in the enclosed loggia that runs the length of the apartment, the mix of guests cast as carefully as his films. “You know when they say you need to put people who go well together?” Guadagnino asks. “I much prefer to put people who fight at the table. Then you have some sort of sparkle at the dinner!”

For one meal, friend and fellow director James Ivory filmed Guadagnino rolling and cutting fresh fettuccine on his pasta-maker. “Luca is no less commanding in the kitchen than on his set — tall, semi-bald, his hair flying up every which way,” Ivory says. Though Guadagnino usually cooks himself, on occasion he invites his friend Niko Romito, Abruzzo’s three-Michelin-star chef, to take charge. Then, the director says, everyone eats very well.

In the loggia, there is an accountant’s standing desk piled with garden books — evidence of yet another love, horticulture. Guadagnino tells me about a trip to Sweden last summer, to visit Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf’s Dream Park. “I told my friends, ‘We have to be there at 8 o’clock in the morning when the light is nicest.’ We land there and everyone is grumpy and then we turn and we are in front of this wonder, and everyone exhales. We spent two hours wandering around. I must admit, I had this slight attack of Stendhal Syndrome.”

He pauses and looks out the window onto the old, twisted plum tree that grows in the courtyard.

“The next house will have a garden.”


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« Reply #544 on: February 12, 2018, 09:38:18 pm »



Simply--WOW!!   Shocked Shocked Shocked


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://vivie-draws.tumblr.com/


by Vivie
21. Cancer sun, Scorpio moon
INFJ, Slytherin, I draw mostly
Death Note and Dragon Age
fanart; Thanks for stopping by



And what difference does it make
When this love is over?
Shall I sleep within your bed
River of unhappiness
Hold your hands upon my head
Till I breathe my last breath


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by vivie
                                                                            art blob


http://vivie-draws.tumblr.com/


Feb 10 2018 580 notes

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName #laterpeaches  #🍑
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva
#timothée chalamet  #armie hammer  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #sufjan stevens
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #music  #song  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #my art #artwork #artist  #vivie #vivie-draws #art blob
#wow #so beautiful
#mystery of love






And Just Because--






« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 08:21:36 am by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #545 on: February 13, 2018, 05:46:23 pm »



Love these!  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://murdurg.tumblr.com/


by murdurg
art bug/china/19
these are my drawins









oh to see without my eyes


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by murdurg
                                                                      art bug


http://murdurg.tumblr.com/
[email protected]


Jan 3 2018 450 notes

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName #laterpeaches  #🍑
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva
#timothée chalamet  #armie hammer  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #sufjan stevens
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #music  #song  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art   #my art   #artwork   #artist   #watercolor   #illustration
#murdurg   #art bug







And FYI













[
A few scenes from Call Me By Your Name  taken at a premiere, source unknown.
https://twitter.com/badpostchalamet  @badpostchalamet  timothée updates
https://twitter.com/apeachpricot  @apeachpricot











https://twitter.com/cmbynmovie


Each leaning on one arm, we both stared out at the view.

"You're the luckiest kid in the world," he said.

"You don't know the half of it."

[....]

"Let's see then--"


And before I knew it, he sidled up to me. We were too close, I thought, I had never been so close to him before except in a dream or when he cupped his hand to light my cigarette. If he brought his ear any closer he'd hear my heart. I'd seen it written in novels but never believed it until now. He stared me right in the face, as though he liked my face and wished to study it and to linger on it---





Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer











by stang1996


Reading poetry (Paul Celan) on Monet's Berm
(can't wait to watch the film!)



CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by stang1996
https://stang1996.deviantart.com/










   HEART OF HEARTS
http://monetsberm.tumblr.com/

Evie
"All that remains is dreammaking and strange remembrance."
semi-hiatus














  by cersell.art
                🎠 Mick | 21 | Dutch


fucking precious moments angel baby



Drawn by cersell.art on commission for @drawsaurus  Thank you!

04.08.17  241 notes
#my art  #commission work  #drawsaurus  #call me by your name











  by Nikko Tan
                                @chroniclikerrr




Monet's Berm
(Sampled the colors from Monet's paintings in Bordighera)


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by Nikko Tan
                                                                           @chroniclikerrr



« Last Edit: February 19, 2018, 10:24:32 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"
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« Reply #546 on: February 14, 2018, 02:02:00 am »



Love these too!   Wink Wink Wink


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
https://lykacanto.tumblr.com/


by lykacanto
The Secret Life of an Optimistic Nihilist


Lethargic
Feb 12th, 2018
870 notes



Lust
Jan 20th, 2018
1,725 notes



Young Bach
Feb 8th, 2018
1,616 notes

My irritability exceeds my inability to fathom the depths
of the human mind, the universe, and of existence itself.


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by lykacanto
                                                                    


https://lykacanto.tumblr.com/


January-February 2018

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName #laterpeaches  #🍑
#peach aesthetic #peaches #pianist #piano #talented #loml #cutie #babe #beautiful
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #elio x oliver  #armie x timothee  #talented actor #great actor #handsome  #love this
#timothée chalamet  #armie hammer  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #sufjan stevens  #song
#young bach  #johann sebastian bach  #music  #musician  #mystery  #mystery of love
#art   #my art   #artwork   #artist   #artsy  #watercolor #illustration
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#my life  #ma vie  #french  #france  #italy  #italia
#lethargic  #lust
#lykacanto




  
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 07:38:13 am by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"
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Those were the days, Alberta 2007.




Ignore
« Reply #547 on: February 15, 2018, 11:09:01 am »

Although this film effects me in similar ways to BBM, they are very different. Both set at the same time in part.

BBM is thoroughly a story as Proulx puts it, of the effects of rural homophobia, where as CMBYN is a basic love story, dealing with same sex attraction but with fewer hurdles to cross. The latter seems to exist in a time and place almost conducive to it happening. What follows, and I sam still working this out in my mind, is the impact this has upon Elios life and relationships that follow.

I wonder too, given the timing of the story's publication, if BBM did not in some way pave the way for this story.

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« Reply #548 on: February 18, 2018, 03:44:48 pm »



BAFTAs announced today.

CMBYN has several nominations:  Best Film, Best Director for Luca, Best Leading Actor for Timothée, Best Adapted Screenplay for James, and "Rising Star Award" for Timothée (this is voted by the public).

Awards are presented February 18 at the Royal Albert Hall.



Bless the BAFTAs! It was they who awarded our Jake!



Yes, indeed!  

Stephen Fry has retired, however, and Joanna Lumley will host this year.






https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2018/feb/18/film-baftas-peter-bradshaw-predictions-2018-death-stalin-lady-macbeth



Baftas 2018
Film blog

Peter Bradshaw's predictions for the 2018 film Baftas
Will Brit hopefuls Lady Macbeth  and The Death of Stalin  triumph?
And will Daniel Day-Lewis get a final gong before retiring?
Our chief critic places his bets


by Peter Bradshaw
@PeterBradshaw1

Sun 18 Feb 2018 02.00 EST



Bowing out ...  Daniel Day-Lewis with Vicky Krieps in Phantom Thread



The Baftas are almost here, exciting news for the truly excellent British films which could well be rewarded: Lady Macbeth, The Death of Stalin, God’s Own Country. There could well be a final Bafta for one of Britain’s great screen actors, Daniel Day-Lewis (although he has dual citizenship with the Republic of Ireland) who is bowing out with a sensational performance, in fact one of his very best, as the enigmatic 1950s fashion designer Reynolds Woodcock in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread. My guess is that Guillermo Del Toro’s swooning romance The Shape of Water will be the big winner, but that Greta Gerwig’s tremendous autobiographical coming-of-age comedy Lady Bird  will have a real showing, largely because of a possible win for Saoirse Ronan in the lead. It is a real disappointment that Bafta voters could not find it in their collective hearts to include a female director on the nomination list. This could have gone, in my view to Gerwig, or to Dee Rees for Mudbound, or even to the brilliantly talented Anna Biller for her The Love Witch. Anyway, here are my predictions:




EXCERPTED:



Best film
Will win: The Shape of Water
Should win: Call Me By Your Name
Shoulda been a contender: Lady Bird


Outstanding British film
Will win: Darkest Hour
Should win: The Death of Stalin
Shoulda been a contender: I Am Not a Witch


Outstanding British debut
Will win: Lady Macbeth
Should win: Lady Macbeth
Shoulda been a contender: The Levelling


Best director
Will win: Christopher NolanDunkirk
Should win: Luca GuadagninoCall Me By Your Name
Shoulda been a contender: Greta GerwigLady Bird


Best adapted screenplay
Will win: James IvoryCall Me By Your Name
Should win: Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin and David SchneiderThe Death of Stalin
Shoulda been a contender: Gaby ChiappeTheir Finest


Best actor
Will win: Daniel Day-LewisPhantom Thread
Should win: Daniel Day-LewisPhantom Thread
Shoulda been a contender: Makis PapadimitriouSuntan


Best supporting actor
Will win: Hugh GrantPaddington 2
Should win: Willem DafoeThe Florida Project
Shoulda been a contender: Michael StuhlbargCall Me By Your Name


Best music
Will win: Hans ZimmerDunkirk
Should win: Hans ZimmerDunkirk
Shoulda been a contender: Natalie Holt and Hildur GuðnadóttirJourney’s End


Best cinematography
Will win: Roger DeakinsBlade Runner 2049
Should win: Roger DeakinsBlade Runner 2049
Shoulda been a contender: M David MullenThe Love Witch





FYI:




Hard to miss the point that The Guardian  really, really liked the film!


https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/dec/22/the-50-top-films-of-2017-no-1-call-me-by-your-name




Call Me By Your Name
Best culture 2017

The 50 top films of 2017: No 1
Call Me by Your Name
Peter Bradshaw celebrates a peach of a film about ecstatic submission
to love –the united No 1 choice of our British and American critics


by Peter Bradshaw
@PeterBradshaw1

Fri 22 Dec ‘17 01.00 EST



Reaches out to anyone with a pulse... Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name



This priority is often overlooked, but pure sensual pleasure is an important part of cinema. So it’s a thrill to see a really outstanding film which provides it, as well as being itself about sensual pleasure – about the desire that precedes it, about an ecstatic submission to love, about the intelligent cultivation of all these things. It is a story of a passionate affair between an older and younger man and reaches out to anyone with a pulse.

James Ivory has adapted André Aciman’s novel and it is directed by Luca Guadagnino. This film constitutes a distinct advance from his previous (excellent) film, A Bigger Splash, which in turn developed the promise of the one before that, I Am Love.

The setting is the early 1980s and Armie Hammer plays Oliver, a handsome, brilliant young scholar who has been invited to the Italian lakeside villa of a distinguished professor of antiquities, Mr Perlman, played by Michael Stuhlbarg, to assist him in his research. It is not, in fact, an onerous task, more a privilege for a favoured grad student. An idyllic, leisured summer is in prospect, with a little cataloguing and venturing out with Perlman to view those classical statues that have been recovered from the lake.

But all that’s really required is good conversation and companionship. Oliver doesn’t have to do much more than hang out with Perlman’s charming family, neighbours and friends; swimming, bicycling, lunching, dining, dancing, drinking, sunbathing in various states of alluring undress. The local women admire the beautiful Oliver and so does Perlman’s delicate, moody, highly strung son Elio, played by Timothée Chalamet. There are some heterosexual encounters for them, but these are each just prototypical foreplay for the main event: the hookup between Elio and Oliver.

Since this film has come out, a lot has been made critically of Elio and Oliver’s scene with the peach, and that is a sensationally erotic and candid moment, with hints of TS Eliot’s Prufrock, or even Philip Roth’s Portnoy’s Complaint. But it isn’t why I value the movie, whose moments of passion and yearning are more diffuse, less showy, though no less explicit. Oliver and Elio’s love is exciting and sexy and moving because of the sophistication and emotional intelligence with which it is framed: a physical liaison in which a great deal is a stake, but intriguingly, homophobia as such does not seem to be the major issue or crucial plot point that it would be in almost any other drama. Oliver says that his father would be disgusted, but Elio’s father very much is not, and his understanding and moral wisdom is part of what makes this film such a thing of wonder, particularly in his final speech to Elio, reproduced closely from Aciman’s original book. Intriguingly, Guadagnino has now announced his Linklateresque intention to develop a sequel, based on later parts of the novel, which this film does not touch on.

Call Me By Your Name reminded me of the extravagant passion of early Alan Hollinghurst novels like The Folding Star  or The Spell, and I can easily imagine Guadagnino bringing those to the screen. Hammer himself gives an excellent performance: sensitive and authoritative, though perhaps he is rather obviously older than his character’s age, and so the difference in age and worldly knowledge is greater than is theoretically intended in the drama. Stuhlbarg is always such a great performer – a leading player in the CoensA Serious Man – but often confined to supporting roles. Yet rarely are they are wonderfully written as this. And Chalamet is piercingly honest as Elio. It is the kind of performance that isn’t just down to actorly technique but openness and emotional purity. It’s an unmissable film.



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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"
Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #549 on: February 18, 2018, 04:21:12 pm »






Bless the BAFTAs! It was they who awarded our Jake!



Yes, indeed!  

Stephen Fry has retired, however, and Joanna Lumley will host this year.









2018















Best adapted screenplay
James Ivory,
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME














https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/18/the-full-list-of-winners-at-the-baftas-2018-film-awards-as-they-happen



Baftas 2018
The full list of winners at the Baftas 2018 film awards
 - as they happen

Will Shape of Water  swan off with the most Baftas?
Or will Three Billboards  put up a good show?
All the winners updated as they are announced


by Guardian film
Sun 18 Feb 2018 15.00 EST First published on Sun 18 Feb 2018 13.44 EST



Photograph: Anthony Devlin/PA


Peter Bradshaw's predictions for the 2018 film Baftas
(winners added as they happened)



EXCERPTED:


EE Rising Star award (voted for by the public)
Florence Pugh
Josh O’Connor
Tessa Thompson
Timothée Chalamet
  http://ee.co.uk/why-ee/ee-baftas/rising-star-nominees/timothee-chalamet
WINNER: Daniel Kaluuya


Best film
Will win: The Shape of Water
Should win: Call Me By Your Name
Shoulda been a contender: Lady Bird
WINNER: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri


Outstanding British film
Will win: Darkest Hour
Should win: The Death of Stalin
Shoulda been a contender: I Am Not a Witch
WINNER: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri


Outstanding British debut
Will win: Lady Macbeth
Should win: Lady Macbeth
Shoulda been a contender: The Levelling
WINNER: I Am Not a Witch – Rungano Nyoni (writer/director), Emily Morgan (Producer)


Best director
Will win: Christopher NolanDunkirk
Should win: Luca GuadagninoCall Me By Your Name
Shoulda been a contender: Greta GerwigLady Bird
WINNER: Guillermo Del Toro, The Shape of Water


Best adapted screenplay
Will win: James IvoryCall Me By Your Name
Should win: Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin and David SchneiderThe Death of Stalin
Shoulda been a contender: Gaby ChiappeTheir Finest
WINNER: James Ivory, Call Me by Your Name


Best actor
Will win: Daniel Day-LewisPhantom Thread
Should win: Daniel Day-LewisPhantom Thread
Shoulda been a contender: Makis PapadimitriouSuntan
Nominated: Timothée Chalamet - Call Me by Your Name
WINNER: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour


Best supporting actor
Will win: Hugh GrantPaddington 2
Should win: Willem DafoeThe Florida Project
Shoulda been a contender: Michael StuhlbargCall Me By Your Name
WINNER: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri


Best music
Will win: Hans ZimmerDunkirk
Should win: Hans ZimmerDunkirk
Shoulda been a contender: Natalie Holt and Hildur GuðnadóttirJourney’s End
WINNER: The Shape of Water


Best cinematography
Will win: Roger DeakinsBlade Runner 2049
Should win: Roger DeakinsBlade Runner 2049
Shoulda been a contender: M David MullenThe Love Witch
WINNER: Blade Runner 2049


« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 02:15:02 am by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"
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