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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017) 0 Residents and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 157281 times)
Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #630 on: August 09, 2018, 09:07:18 pm »




I GOT THAT SUMMERTIME SADNESS





Kiss Me Hard Before You Go | Summertime Sadness | I Just Wanted You To Know
That Baby You're The Best

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'Summertime Sadness' (2012)
(Lana Del Rey)




“Later is better than never.”

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use"
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Laurel Chen
Published on Dec 26, 2017


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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #631 on: August 09, 2018, 09:18:01 pm »




"Where are you now?"




"Where are you now?"

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'Faded' (2015)
(Alan Walker and Iselin Solheim)


ISHTAR
Published on Dec 21, 2017



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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #632 on: August 09, 2018, 09:34:18 pm »




"Where are you?"





"Where are you?"

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'I Love You' (2013)
Quintet Version

Woodkid - Yoann Lemoine
(and Ambroise Willaume)


Music: WOODKID - I Love You (Quintet Version)
Peaches Art: Cara Brown - Life in Full Color
Edit: alexiabertha

All copyrighted material belongs their respective owners


ʙᴇʀᴛʜᴀ
(alexiabertha)

Published on Jan 2, 2018



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« Reply #633 on: August 10, 2018, 12:30:40 am »

The Summertime Sadness.. .  yes, I can relate to that.
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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #634 on: August 10, 2018, 11:13:20 am »

The Summertime Sadness.. .  yes, I can relate to that.


Ain't it the truth, Lee.   Undecided
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« Reply #635 on: August 10, 2018, 06:25:15 pm »

https://hamptons-magazine.com/andre-aciman-on-call-me-by-your-name-and-its-sequel



ANDRE ACIMAN ON
THE CALL ME BY YOUR NAME SEQUEL
& WHY HE LOVES
THE MOVIE ADAPTATION OF HIS BOOK

Call Me By Your Name  author André Aciman on the impact of his novel, its movie, and how he hopes its sequel ends.

By Gary Duff
April 2, 2018



Illustration by Kit Mills.



There are so many people who read this book, watched the movie, had an experience with your work—I think, because you give them serious consideration in literature in ways other authors don’t—are there other books that tell this story?

There were some books that did tell the story but I think for most people—and it’s hard for me to say what it is that they reacted to precisely because they don’t know and they never tell me when I ask—what the book does is open up a space. The sentences are long, the scenes are quite extended, and I think what they learn to see in it is a degree of intimacy that they have had in life in very scattered ways. And they’re also chronologically tabulated for you so that you can reread the same passage time and time again. In other words, it’s such an extended moment of absolute introspect and intimacy with other people, and of course, a whole analysis of desire without being academic or clinical. It allows people to say, “Yes, I’ve known this all my life. Why was it that I never was able to formulate it before?”


And how much of a say did you have in the initial movie?

Oh, I could’ve had a lot of say had I wanted to. I just didn’t think it wasn't going to help anything if the author keeps intruding on what is in the hands of people who know everything about production. I had a screenwriter who was based in the business and a director who was also the inheritor of the tradition of Luchino Visconti. What was I going to tell them, how to film? So I decided to shut up and just let them do what they wanted.


But I assume that you’re happy with the end result?

Yes, very, very, very happy. I love the movie. I’ve seen it too many times, and now whenever I walk in to do a post-screening talk, I usually arrive at the moment when the father’s having the conversation with the son, and then that long extended moment when Timothée [Chalamet] is staring into the camera, and I think it’s just fabulous. It’s fabulous.


Had you envisioned a sequel before the director, Luca Guadagnino, said, “I’d like to do a sequel”?

Well, I mean, I can understand why he wants to do a sequel because the book itself has their meeting fifteen, twenty years later, so the story doesn’t end where the film ends, so it keeps going, and evolving, and so on. Had I imagined a sequel? No, I didn’t, but I think it’s a sexy idea and it’s interesting. I like the idea. I don’t think it will take shape for another few years because he is busy doing other things and I’m busy doing something else but it’s a nice way to avoid closure and I hate closure to begin with.


I don’t know how much Luca has shared with you about what he wants to deal with in the sequel, but are there particular things, story-wise, you could share with us?

Not really. I would stay to the script that I had given but he wants to meander slightly to the left and to the right. I mean, obviously we’re interested in the fact that there’s an AIDS crisis going on as these two kids are maturing, and of course, one gets sort of shoved to the side, as I did in the book, so he wants to discuss that. But then again, he is like me. We’re truly abstract and so he wants to touch on it but he doesn’t want to make it an AIDS film otherwise because that will take the whole thing away from where it was and where it was headed. I mean, I created it and I think he followed through with a story that is simply in a kind of erotic utopia and that has to work.


So does that mean that there’s no happy ending at the end of that?

Oh, there might be a happy ending. I like a happy ending. I mean, there is a happy ending at the end of the book itself except nobody sees it; everybody thinks that they’re preparing to say goodbye forever for themselves. It’s absolutely not that. Oliver comes back and he may have arranged to stay forever. We don’t know.


But I imagine, in your head, there is a world that they’re together and maybe there’s a world that they’re not together, no?

Both are totally plausible, yes.


The truth for you though, lies where?

Oh, the truth for me lies, not in their being together or not together, but in considering the possibilities of both things because that’s where my mind goes. I always end my books in the conditional mood so it’s always sort of like a psychological ambivalence on my part. I don’t want to resolve it. Let the reader decide where they are going. Let circumstances dictate. I don’t want to be the one to tell you what is going to happen to them for the rest of their lives. It’s an outward journey, as far as I’m concerned. My books end with sort of a valediction to the reader. You take it where you want.


I can’t tell you how many people begged me to ask you for a happy ending with the sequel…

You know what? It would make me very happy to make them happy. If this is where Luca wants to go, I think it makes sense. I do think, I mean, when you consider the love of Elio and Oliver, I think it’s fair to say it’s never going to go away, and I think the indication that it’s there to stay is in a scene at the very, very end of the book when they meet again at the college and Oliver says, “Why don’t you come and have dinner at my house? You’ll meet my wife, you’ll meet my kids,” and Elio says, “No, I can’t,” and in his inability to say yes, what he’s really saying is, “I’m still connected. I’m still hooked up to the thing that we had and this is going to interfere with that. This is going to ruin the picture.” And maybe Oliver was looking for a friendship, but at the very end, Oliver is the one who comes and visits him, and it’s not out of friendship.




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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #636 on: August 12, 2018, 06:22:58 pm »



(Very loosely translated from the Italian by Google.)


https://www.corriere.it/spettacoli/18_giugno_15/luca-guadagnino-suspiria-mio-elogio-paura-47ab328c-7003-11e8-b9b6-434f28412ff9.shtml


THE INTERVIEW
The guest director in Castiglioncello:
Luca Guadagnino on Suspiria:   My eulogy of fear
"With the remake of the film by Dario Argento I pay tribute to a subjective feeling.
The sequel to Call Me By Your Name ? It is already written."


By Stefania Ulivi
14 June 2018
(updated 15 June 2018 | 20:14)






Elio and Oliver, the protagonists of Call Me By Your Name, now live their own life. Luca Guadagnino, who brought André Aciman's novel to the screen, follows them with amusement. "The second chapter of their love? I can say with certainty what will be done, in the book it is already written." The long wave of Oscar's success of the film brings him today to the XIV edition of Talking about Cinema in Castiglioncello  for a meeting with Paolo Mereghetti. The director is also amazed at the way in which the public has adopted that story.
"[Elio and Oliver's] admirers are different, from teenagers to senior citizens all over the world. A transversal phenomenon".



You started as a film critic, what explanation did you give?

[André Aciman's protagonists in Call Me By Your Name ] have unlocked the need to communicate. As if, set in the eighties in which our constant digital connections did not exist, it was a small dip, an involuntary exhortation to resume a certain way of communicating among people, to talk to each other.


Tonight in Castiglioncello, you will bring two cut scenes from Call Me By Your Name  to show. Which?

One in which Elio invites Oliver to tour the village, attempting a very subtle form of seduction. And another in which Elio and Oliver are kissing under the moonlight in the garden under a lime tree and upstairs, with the windows open, the two parents hear the whispers of the two young lovers and are pushed to regain their own passion.


Why did you cut them?

The scenes were removed because, for whatever reason, though well-acted, they did not work, either because the film was too long, or because the cut scenes did not serve the story.


Not self-censorship?

In the list of my favorite films there are The empire of the senses, Querelle de Brest and Last tango in Paris. Extreme cinema is fundamental to my training. Even in my first short, a sexual relationship was presented explicitly. And A bigger splash  opens with the flirtation of Matthias Schoenaerts and Tilda Swinton. But sexuality and intimacy are very different and this is a film that tells about intimacy. As an old movie lover, I know that in the gay thematic films, you put on the cockade of strong scenes as if to say "we are not afraid of anything", but so they risk becoming a genre. And I hate being pigeonholed.


With Suspiria, a remake of Dario Argento's horror film, it goes to the antipodes.

It's a tribute to a great movie, first seen when I was a boy, that deals with something very subjective, fear. I am happy with the result, it is the symphony of the combined effort of great personalities. We are like lucky children in a playground, which turn the vividly cultivated imagination into reality.


You say it's your most personal film. Is it not a contradiction?

I do not believe that originality lies in generating an idea but rather in the point of view. [Italian opera director Damiano] Michieletto with the lyric makes unique works famous.


Speaking of fear, what scares you?

What scares me? The human being. I say that as optimistic and open as I am. In Suspiria  there is a character inspired by the German philologist who in his diary The language of the third Reich  recorded how words were emptied and filled with a terrible sense. Today I'm frightened by phrases like "that ship goes where it wants but not in Italy" or "la pacchia è finita."


Next project?

Me as producer for a Hitchcockian thriller Born to be a murderer,  directed by [my life partner] Ferdinando Cito Filomarino.




« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 02:09:02 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

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« Reply #637 on: August 13, 2018, 04:33:23 am »

We’ve been denied a scene of them kissing in the moonlight?? That’s cruel!
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« Reply #638 on: August 13, 2018, 10:42:51 am »

I very much like this statement: "But sexuality and intimacy are very different and this is a film that tells about intimacy."

I agree with that, and I don't just mean about the movie.
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« Reply #639 on: August 13, 2018, 12:41:41 pm »


Tonight in Castiglioncello, you will bring two cut scenes from Call Me By Your Name  to show. Which?

One in which Elio invites Oliver to tour the village, attempting a very subtle form of seduction. And another in which Elio and Oliver are kissing under the moonlight in the garden under a lime tree and upstairs, with the windows open, the two parents hear the whispers of the two young lovers and are pushed to regain their own passion.


Deleted scenes!!!!!  Not included on the DVD!!!
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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017) « previous next »
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