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Author Topic: Holiday Menus  (Read 38160 times)
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« on: November 20, 2006, 08:07:59 am »

Greetings, all!

A suggestion was made in chat to have a thread for Holiday Menus (not recipes). Since we are such an international group, we thought it would be fun to see what people traditionally eat for special occasions during this holiday season...Hanukah brunch, Christmas Eve dinner, New Year's Day, etc...you name the event and tell us what is found on your table. Don't include recipes here. If you want to include recipes, post them on the appropriate thread. And if you want to ask someone for a recipe...that's fine too!

Have fun! I am looking forward to reading lots of interesting menus!

Leslie
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2006, 08:11:04 am »

I'll get the ball rolling...just as Santa will always come down the chimney, this meal will always be on the table for Christmas Dinner in our family.

THE NICOLL FAMILY CHRISTMAS MENU

Standing rib roast
Yorkshire pudding
Creamed onions
Creamed spinach
Peas
Horseradish sauce

Dessert -- varies. Nothing particularly traditional about dessert in our household, for some reason!

Leslie
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2006, 10:07:55 am »

This is really jumping ahead, but the traditional Pennsylvania German New Year's Day dinner is roast pork with sauerkraut. It's one of those dishes that's supposed to bring you good luck in the coming year if you eat it on New Year's Day. Contrariwise, no proper Pennsylvania German would eat chicken on New Year's Day. Why? Because chickens scratch backward--a bad sign at the beginning of the new year--whereas hogs (pork) root forward.  Grin

Since sauerkraut is said to be rich in vitamin C, perhaps there is kernal of truth behind the tradition of eating it on New Year's Day. Back in the days before people knew about vitamins, it would be a good thing to consume something rich in vitamin C in the depth of winter.
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2006, 10:45:35 am »

Here's my menu for this Thanksgiving (we're having two couples over):

14-lb roasted turkey
Giblet gravy
Traditional stuffing (made with baguettes, onions, celery, chicken broth, and lots of butter)
Mashed potatoes (made with Idaho potatoes, heavy cream, and lots of butter)
Cranberry relish (made with fresh cranberries, oranges, and orange liquer (but no butter!))
Green bean casserole (the hokey magazine kind, made with mushroom soup and that dried onion stuff on top)

And for dessert: a triple-layer chocolate mud pie, made with a chocolate pie crust, semi-sweet bakers chocolate, chocolate pudding mix, pecans, and whipped cream.  (I wanted to do my specialty - Southern bourbon pecan pie - but my husband doesn't care for it, the nutjob, so I promised I'd make a pie he was guaranteed to like this year.)
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2006, 11:03:26 am »

Green bean casserole is one of those comfort foods I like to eat about once, or maybe twice, a year. I made it a few weeks ago for dinner at my parent's house. According to the Durkee's French Fried Onions can, it is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Imagine, a casserole having an anniversary!

L
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2006, 11:32:08 am »

Green bean casserole is one of those comfort foods I like to eat about once, or maybe twice, a year. I made it a few weeks ago for dinner at my parent's house. According to the Durkee's French Fried Onions can, it is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Imagine, a casserole having an anniversary!

L

Hunh! Considering that it uses Campbell's cream of mushroom soup, I would have thought the green bean casserole was older than a mere 50 years.

I can safely say without fear of contradiction that green bean casserole is something that has never graced a holiday table with its presence on either side of my family. For vegetables we stick with corn and lima beans. Even mashed potatoes are considered de trops because we always have sweet potatoes, in addition to the stuffing.

Some cooks actually include mashed potatoes into the mixture that makes up the stuffing, though my mother never did, and I've never particularly cared for mashed potato stuffing.
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2006, 11:59:02 am »

My mother was definitely a woman of the 50s and 60s and took advantage of all those convenience foods we laugh at now...green bean casserole, jello salad, tuna wiggle...you name it, we ate it. Now I read these recipes and say mostly say "Yuck!" but there are a few holdouts I remember fondly, and still make.

Leslie
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2006, 01:36:38 pm »

Man, am I getting hungry!  I'd gladly show up to dinner at any of your houses this week!  Grin

Jeff, thanks for the interesting low-down on pork and sauerkraut.  My mother always served that on New Year's Day, and it's nice to know the reasoning behind it.  Cool
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2006, 01:47:38 pm »

What on earth is "tuna wiggle"? Do I really want to know?  Grin

Thankfully, my mother seems to have missed that one.   Cheesy
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2006, 02:09:31 pm »

I'm guessing "tuna wiggle" is canned tuna inside a jello mold.  That's enough to make a vegetarian out of me.


Re green bean casserole:  My Mom was also into the new conveniences of the 50s and 60s, which meant we rarely had fresh vegetables.  However, at Thanksgiving, we always had fresh green beans (cooked to death in the pressure pot).   We had a variation on the casserole, but for the leftovers:  it was like lasagna, in layers.  A layer of shredded turkey covered with a layer of stuffing covered with a layer of green beans, the whole mess infused with cream of mushroom soup and baked.

Those onion thingies in a can scare me.
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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2006, 02:18:04 pm »

What on earth is "tuna wiggle"? Do I really want to know?  Grin

Thankfully, my mother seems to have missed that one.   Cheesy

Tuna Wiggle

1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 can tuna fish (drained)
1 small can mushrooms, chopped and drained
1 box frozen peas (optional, but my mother always included them)
1 2 lb. bag egg noodles

Cook egg noodles as usual. Drain and return to stove. Mix in soup, tuna fish, peas, and mushrooms. Cook over high heat until hot. Remove and serve.

Enjoy!

Leslie


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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2006, 02:18:50 pm »

I'm guessing "tuna wiggle" is canned tuna inside a jello mold.  That's enough to make a vegetarian out of me.


 Tongue  Me, too.

Thanks, Paul.

(Fruit in jello I honestly don't mind--for a summer dessert, Mother used to put diced apple in lime jello, and I liked that; very cool and refreshing. But tuna?  Tongue )
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« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2006, 02:19:44 pm »

OH - you mean tuna noodle casserole.  My Mom made it with Campbell's Cream of Chicken soup and minus the mushrooms.  Good stuff!   Cheesy
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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2006, 02:20:27 pm »

Tuna Wiggle

1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 can tuna fish (drained)
1 small can mushrooms, chopped and drained
1 box frozen peas (optional, but my mother always included them)
1 2 lb. bag egg noodles

Cook egg noodles as usual. Drain and return to stove. Mix in soup, tuna fish, and mushrooms. Cook over high heat until hot. Remove and serve.



Leslie, that doesn't look like it would wiggle very much.
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« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2006, 02:23:08 pm »

Leslie, that doesn't look like it would wiggle very much.

Yeah, but what a name!

Leslie
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« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2006, 02:26:09 pm »

Leslie, that doesn't look like it would wiggle very much.

It needs to be shaken - not sitirred. Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2006, 02:34:34 pm »

Hey, did you see Casino Royale this past weekend, too, Clarissa?
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« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2006, 02:51:42 pm »

Hey, did you see Casino Royale this past weekend, too, Clarissa?


No, just been reading your thread on it, Barb. Smiley
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« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2006, 03:04:40 pm »

Actually, to my 1950's-raised self, tuna wiggle doesn't sound half bad.  Grin

I thought it might refer to the noodles being wiggly, like those spiral-y ones.  Smiley
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« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2006, 03:19:10 pm »

to get this thread back on track, how about

THANKSGIVING AT THE NICOLL-JENDREK HOME

Roast Turkey
Stuffing made with bread, onions, salt, pepper, chicken broth and lots of butter
Gravy
Mashed sweet potatoes wtih marshmallows on top
Creamed onions*
Brussel sprouts with chestnuts (I loathe this dish and refuse to eat or make, so my mother always gets stuck with the job)
Homemade cranberry sauce (use the recipe on the bag; it's easy)
Aunt Cuyler's lime-cheese salad (another one of those 50s confections with lime jello, mayonnaise, cottage cheese, evap milk and nuts)
Pumpkin pie for dessert

My recipe for creamed onions is over on the main courses & side dishes thread.

Leslie
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« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2006, 03:46:01 pm »

Stuffing made with bread, onions, salt, pepper, chicken broth and lots of butter

What?  No celery???  Wink


Homemade cranberry sauce (use the recipe on the bag; it's easy)

I was gonna use a pretty easy-looking one I found in November's "Real Simple" magazine, but now that you mention it, I'll take a look-see.  Smiley
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« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2006, 04:54:30 pm »

Brussel sprouts with chestnuts (I loathe this dish and refuse to eat or make, so my mother always gets stuck with the job)

Oooh, sounds good to me! Heh heh heh. I l-o-o-o-v-e Brussels sprouts!  Grin
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« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2006, 05:06:04 pm »

Oooh, sounds good to me! Heh heh heh. I l-o-o-o-v-e Brussels sprouts!  Grin

Well I won't. or don't. or whatever! LOL
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« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2006, 05:36:45 pm »

I love Brussels sprouts, too.  But I love lima beans even more.  I think it's quite possible Jeff and I may be the only people who fall into both categories.  Basically, with the exception of olives, I have never met a vegetable I didn't like.
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« Reply #24 on: November 20, 2006, 11:58:59 pm »

I love Brussels sprouts, too.  But I love lima beans even more.  I think it's quite possible Jeff and I may be the only people who fall into both categories.  Basically, with the exception of olives, I have never met a vegetable I didn't like.


OMG, somebody else who likes lima beans!  Grin

For me, it's pretty much the case that if it's a vegetable and you can put butter and salt on it, I'll eat it.  Grin

I only recently acquired a taste for olives, however.

Barb, how do you feel about turnips? Not for Thanksgiving, but in general?
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« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2006, 12:12:24 am »

I like lima beans, if they're made from dry beans and not the frozen ones. And I like Brussels sprouts, if they're fresh and not frozen.

In fact, I made Brussels sprouts just tonight!

Here's my recipe, beloved by 3 out of 4 family members: Wash and trim sprouts, cut into quarters. Melt butter in small wok-shaped pan given to you by your mother-in-law years ago. Keep heat high. Put Brussels sprouts in pan and toss to coat with melted butter. Let them cook, stirring occasionally, until they're tender and singed or even kind of blackened around the edges. The more burny looking, the better (within reason).

Yum! They're also good stir-fried in sesame oil.
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« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2006, 12:19:51 am »

Barb, how do you feel about turnips? Not for Thanksgiving, but in general?

Turnips are my friend.  Especially if you boil the bejesus out of them and then put butter and salt on 'em. 
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« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2006, 12:22:16 am »

I like lima beans, if they're made from dry beans and not the frozen ones. And I like Brussels sprouts, if they're fresh and not frozen.

I won't touch frozen Brussels sprouts. The only frozen Brussel sprouts I ever had were just plain icky.  Tongue

I'll take lima beans either way. Mother served the green limas, either fresh or frozen, with butter sauce, and she used dried limas to cook with potatoes and ham hocks.

Now I'm hoping I can convert my dad to the joys of fresh broccoli, instead of frozen. ...
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« Reply #28 on: November 21, 2006, 12:24:52 am »

Turnips are my friend.  Especially if you boil the bejesus out of them and then put butter and salt on 'em. 

Yum!  Grin That's what my mother always did, adding potatoes and carrots to the turnips. She usually served up a great big dish of that mixture, with pork chops for the meat.
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« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2006, 12:27:44 am »

Homemade cranberry sauce (use the recipe on the bag; it's easy)

It is easy and good, but use extreme caution!!  The first year I tried it, I had cranberries exploding all over the stovetop.  Too hot, or no lid, or some such issue!   Tongue
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« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2006, 12:29:59 am »

Yum!  Grin That's what my mother always did, adding potatoes and carrots to the turnips. She usually served up a great big dish of that mixture, with pork chops for the meat.

That sounds 'nummy.  You know, I think vegetables are really just butter/salt vessels.  They all taste about the same to me.   Maybe that's why I don't like olives - you kinda havta eat them raw.  And unlike other raw veggies, they have a distinctive taste.  Definitely an acquired one, in my opinion, and I haven't acquired it yet.  But I do love to cook with olive oil.  Go figure.
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« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2006, 03:02:05 am »

I'm guessing "tuna wiggle" is canned tuna inside a jello mold.  That's enough to make a vegetarian out of me.


Re green bean casserole:  My Mom was also into the new conveniences of the 50s and 60s, which meant we rarely had fresh vegetables.  However, at Thanksgiving, we always had fresh green beans (cooked to death in the pressure pot).   We had a variation on the casserole, but for the leftovers:  it was like lasagna, in layers.  A layer of shredded turkey covered with a layer of stuffing covered with a layer of green beans, the whole mess infused with cream of mushroom soup and baked.

Those onion thingies in a can scare me.
  THAT IS SCARY,,,  i may never eat jello again....green food not grown in a garden kind of creeps me out....janice
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« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2006, 03:06:34 am »

I love Brussels sprouts, too.  But I love lima beans even more.  I think it's quite possible Jeff and I may be the only people who fall into both categories.  Basically, with the exception of olives, I have never met a vegetable I didn't like.

i love nearly all vegies, green beans, brussel sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, lima beans...all sound good to me...but lime jello, not so much, no matter what you put in
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« Reply #33 on: November 21, 2006, 03:13:10 am »

         my holiday menu includes fried stuffing sandwiches for lunch the day after thanksgiving....go to the fridge and slice it off,  fry in butter of course, and make a sandwich with choice of bread, and mayo. put cranberry sauce on top of stuffing a little or a lot,,,,,,good stuff
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« Reply #34 on: November 21, 2006, 11:11:35 am »

You know, I think vegetables are really just butter/salt vessels.

Tell you what, I think you may be on to something there, Barb!  Grin
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« Reply #35 on: November 21, 2006, 04:28:00 pm »

         my holiday menu includes fried stuffing sandwiches for lunch the day after thanksgiving....go to the fridge and slice it off,  fry in butter of course, and make a sandwich with choice of bread, and mayo. put cranberry sauce on top of stuffing a little or a lot,,,,,,good stuff

Can't say I've ever had a "fried stuffing sandwich," but my mother's preferred way to reheat leftover stuffing--back in the day before God and Amana gave us microwave ovens--was to fry it in butter. Went real good that way with leftover gravy on top!  Grin
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« Reply #36 on: November 21, 2006, 07:05:21 pm »

Yum, there's something about anything fried in butter that has an appeal!  Grin

Jeff and Janice, there's now a Leftovers thread for stuff like stuffing.  Wink
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« Reply #37 on: November 21, 2006, 07:11:12 pm »

Yum, there's something about anything fried in butter that has an appeal!  Grin

You bet! It doesn't have anything to do with holiday meals--or holiday leftovers--but when I was a very small boy, my mother's method of reheating leftover macaroni and cheese was--you guessed it!--to fry it in butter!  Grin
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« Reply #38 on: December 02, 2006, 05:49:29 am »

Just for fun  Cheesy  These are actual Christmas Menus from historic places in the old west, collected by North Pole West in Cody Wyoming.  Some I'm sure you will recognize

Christmas Dinner Menu
LaVeta Hotel, December 1889
 Claret Wine      Reisling Wine 
Blue Point Oysters     Hearts of Lettuce    Kalamazoo Celery
Oyster Consomme a la Jardiniere    Barbecued Trout     Parisienne Potatoes matre d h Boiled Ham
Brazed Elk    Champignons Blance Rabbit a la Francisco     Duck a la Maringue    Queen Fritters Sweet Wine
Roast Prime Rib of Beef    Young Pig Stuffed with Apple Sauce     Povindeur of Turkey     Cranberry Sauce
Antelope with Current Jelly    Chicken Salad Mayonaise      Mashed Potatoes     Baked Sweet Potatoes
Petits Pois Hot Slaw    Green Apple Pie     Mince Pie     La Veta Ice Cream  Assorted Cake
Christmas Plum Pudding with Hard and Brandy Sauce     Fruits   Raisins    Assorted Nuts    Muscat Grapes
Chocolate with Whipped Cream   


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Christmas Dinner Menu
Shared between Trappers and Indians Utah, 1840
Stewed Elk Meat Boiled Deer Meat
Boiled Flour Pudding with Dried Fruit and Sour Berry Sauce 
Cakes and Strong Coffee Sweetened

After dinner tobacco pipes were smoked
Shooting contests passed the remainder of the day. 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Christmas Dinner Menu
Camp Desolation, 1848
Recorded by Thomas E. Breckenridge, member of Colonel John Fremonts 4th expedition west.

Soup: Fried Mule Mule Chops      Boiled Mule    Stewed Mule
 Boiled Mule   Scrambled Mule     Shirred Mule    French Fried Mule     Minced Mule
 Damned Mule Mule on Toast
(without toast) Short ribs of Mule with Apple Sauce (without Apple Sauce)   
Beverages: Snow Snow Water Water   

"It really makes no difference how our meat was cooked. It was still the same ould mule".
****Note: He might have been exaggerating

Booth Family Christmas Dinner Menu
Four Mile House, Denver, Colorado 1883


Stewed Oysters, Boned Turkey
Stuffed Ham, Mashed Potatoes
Turnips, Beets,
Fried Celery Gelatin with Fruits and Nuts,
Candied Sweet Potatoes, Plum Pudding,  Baked Lemon Pudding .
Fruit Cake, Nuts, Candied Oranges, Coffee 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mountain Man Christmas Dinner - White River region 1842
"This great annual feast is observerd with all the exhilaration hilarity and good cheer that circumstances will allow. Several little extras for the occasion have been procured from the Indians, which prove quite wholesome and pleasent-tasted. One of these, called washena, consists of dried meat pulverized and mixed with marrow; another is a preparation of cherries, preserved when first picked by pounding and sun drying them (they are served by mixing them with bouille, or the liquor of fresh boiled meat, thus giving to it an agreeable winish taste); a third is a marrow fat, an article in many respects superior to butter; and lastly, we obtained a kind of flour made from the pomme blanc (white apple), answering very well as a substite for that of grain.
The above assortment, with a small supply of sugar and coffee, as well as several other dainties variously prepared, affords an excellent dinner, and though different in kind, by no means inferior in quality to the generality of dinners for which the day is noted in more civilized communities.
Rufus B. Sage 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cheyenne Cowboy Stew
1 pound cubed brains
1 pound cubed sweetbreads
2 cubed beef kidneys
1 cubed beef heart  1/2 pound cubed beef liver
1/2 pound cubed beef meat
3 pounds marrow gut sliced into 3/4" peices

Place all ingredients in a cast iron pot; add 1/2 gallon of water- bring to a boil.
Then let simmer for 5-6 hours. Add additional liquid if need be. Season to taste.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Christmas Dinner
Fort Custer, Montana

Troop G
1st U.S. Cavalry
1889



Soup
Oyster
Macaroni Entres
Broiled Prairie Chicken
Roast Porterhouse Beef, Natural sauce
Venison, Applesauce
Pig
Turkey with Cranberry Sauce
Oyster Dressing

Salads
Lobster, French Slaw, Shrimp

Vegtables
Potatoes,mashed   Onions,stewed
Sugar Corn    Beets
Potatoes,roasted   Tomatoes,steamed
 
Relishes
Worcestershire Sauce, Chow Chow
French Mustard
Pickled Cucumbers 
Pickled Onions


 
  Pastry
Mince Pie
Cranberry Pie
Apple Pie

Dessert
Preserved Peaches
Preserved Pears 
Apples
Raisins
Nuts

Tea    Coffeee    Chocolate 



 
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« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2006, 07:30:10 am »

"Mmmm" (sound of Ennis diggin' inta the can a beans)

"hyucghhh" (sound of Ennis kneeling in the alley)

Some of these are more delightful-sounding than others.  All are right interestin' though, thanks, Dottie.
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« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2006, 01:32:46 pm »

Thanks, Dot!  Those are a perfect addition to our cowboy-themed holiday thread.  Cool

I'm with Elle, some of those sound better than others.  And can this be right:

Stewed Oysters, Boned Turkey
Stuffed Ham, Mashed Potatoes

Surely they mean Boned Ham and Stuffed Turkey?  Tongue

Also, I wonder how those cavalry troops in Montana got hold of lobster and shrimp?  Huh?

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« Reply #41 on: December 02, 2006, 05:34:46 pm »

Thanks, Dot!  Those are a perfect addition to our cowboy-themed holiday thread.  Cool

I'm with Elle, some of those sound better than others.  And can this be right:

Stewed Oysters, Boned Turkey
Stuffed Ham, Mashed Potatoes

Surely they mean Boned Ham and Stuffed Turkey?  Tongue

Also, I wonder how those cavalry troops in Montana got hold of lobster and shrimp?  Huh?



Actually Meryl, I'm told on good authority that Seafood east of California and west of the Mississippi  would have shipped out of either Seattle or San Francisco.  Both with large Asian populations so that prior to the completion of the first trancontinental railroad in 1869 and the second in 1882, seafood in other than coastal was shipped either precooked and packed in salt or brine, or dried and needed to be reconsitited upon arrival.  After the completion of the railroad the railroad, seafood was ship to the nearest rail head packed in ice.  Upon arrival the ice was replenished and then it was couriered by wagon or stage.  The cost was almost prohibative so it was reserved for very special occassions.

As for the turkey verses the ham.  Stuffed Ham was a very popular dish in some parts of the country and I understand still is the South.  Here's a modern version of the recipe.

CHRISTMAS STUFFED BAKED HAM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Bake at 325 degrees for 2 1/2 hours. Serves 12. (Delicious and makes a festive holiday presentation with the pink ham and mixed green stuffing!)

1 fully cooked ham (about 10 to 12 lbs.)
1 (10 oz.) pkg. frozen chopped kale
1 c. finely chopped fresh spinach
1 lg. onion, finely chopped (1 c.)
3/4 c. finely chopped watercress
1/2 c. finely chopped celery tops (leaves)
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/2 c. honey
2 tbsp. cider vinegar
2 tsp. dry mustard

(Ask your grocer produce manager to order watercress for you in advance. It's not always locally available.
1. Trim rind off ham, if any. Trim fat to 1/4 inch thickness. Make X-shaped cuts with a small paring knife, 2 inches deep and 1 inch apart; stagger the rows, all over fat side.

2. Cook hole in boiling salted water to cover, following directions on package; drain; cool; squeeze out excess water with hands.

3. Combine kale, fresh spinach, onion, fresh watercress, fresh celery leaves, salt and pepper in a medium-sized bowl.

4. Press greens mixture into pockets in ham; pack down well with fingertips. Place ham, fat side up, in a large shallow pan.

5. Bake in a slow oven (325 degrees) for 2 minutes.

6. Stir honey with vinegar and dry mustard; brush part over ham. Continue baking and brushing with the remaining honey mixture, 30 minutes or until top of ham is richly glazed. Remove ham from pan. Let stand 20 minutes before carving.

7. Carve ham carefully, holding slices together to keep the stuffing intact. Garnish platter with glazed carrots and fresh watercress leaves!


According to my cookbook, frontier families would often use spinach, dandielion greens, pote salad, collard greens, turnip greens, mustard greens and various wild greens to stuff their hams.
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« Reply #42 on: December 09, 2006, 09:18:37 am »

We have a venison roast in the freezer from hunting this fall, so for Christmas Eve, this will be on the table at the Lazy L:

Roasted Rack of Venison with Shallots and Dried-Cranberry Gravy
Braised Red Cabbage
Golden Creamed Onions
Green Beans
Mashed Potatoes

For dessert: Lemon-Poppyseed Cake

Jack
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« Reply #43 on: December 09, 2006, 02:45:37 pm »

Yum!

*Meryl gets out her 30-30*

I'm off to shoot elk!  You comin' with me, Jack?  Cool
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« Reply #44 on: December 16, 2006, 10:15:44 am »

Here are two of my recent Christmas dinner menus:

For 2004, I planned a traditional Italian Christmas dinner with a few French touches tossed in. The appetizer was simple—jumbo cocktail shrimp with a spicy sauce to dip in, plus a host of appetizers served in cut crystal relish dishes passed on to me by my mother.  The appetizers included mixed fruit, pickles, pickled onions, spiced crab apples, and special olives.

I usually like to serve a soup after the appetizer and I had selected a rice noodle and bok choy soup, but I had to delete the soup course this year in order to keep to our schedule—we were planning to go to a 5 p.m movie. So, I went ahead to the main course—duck. I had prepared the duck the traditional Italian way—rubbing it with cracked black pepper, garlic, salt and rosemary and letting it rest uncovered in the refrigerator for a couple of days beforehand in order to ensure a crisp skin.

On “Christmas” day, I put the duck in the oven in a roasting pan on a rack above a pan of water. I let the duck roast for about 1.5 hours, without basting or glazing. Instead of making a gravy or sauce, I served peach chutney to slather on the duck. It was delicious.

I poached Brussels sprouts, which my daughter loves, and stirred into them a mixture of butter, honey, mustard, horseradish, freshly ground pepper, and maple syrup. I also placed some quartered acorn squash in the roasting pan with the duck, which was done in about an hour. I dressed it simply with butter, freshly ground pepper, and a few spices.

Finally, I made an Italian dish, a Christmas spaghetti with a sauce of olive oil, roasted walnuts (on a pie plate in the oven) garlic, anchovies, and parsley. I bought parsley roots for the first time, which look live baby parsnips with parsley tops. The pasta was a big hit. All was served with basil bread that I had baked the previous weekend.

The salad came later, in the Italian tradition. It was a simple salad of arugula, grapefruit sections, and pomegranate seeds, with a vinaigrette made with mild rice vinegar and blue cheese to sprinkle over the top.

Christmas 2003

This Christmas finds us all together, no hockey tournament this year.  The weather cooperated—a little overcast in the morning and then sunny and mild.

Father made pancakes for breakfast. The buttermilk biscuits could wait for dinner. I used the recipe from the Crème de Colorado cookbook.

Appetizers will be little crab cakes with avocado slices, red radishes.

The meat will be ham, which will go well with the biscuits. I will serve a special mustard, gravy, and chutney that I made last weekend with the ham. We will also have cranberry relish, Mama Stamberg’s recipe. And a cranberry waldorf salad too.

There are a wealth of vegetables this  year. I will serve steamed cauliflower with a sauce from the Crème de Colorado cookbook. Also green beans and pumpkin wedges. Mushrooms and a salad made with sliced fennel and grapes. Sliced beets with a topping of dried apricots and crème fraiche.
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« Reply #45 on: December 22, 2006, 11:34:33 pm »

Lee, I want to eat at your house!  Smiley  Those sound wonderful.  Great ingredients creatively mixed together. 
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« Reply #46 on: December 26, 2007, 01:48:38 pm »

How did you like your holiday menus this year?

At Front-Ranger's we had a simpler feast than previous years. We are planning to go out of town for New Year's and we didn't want a bunch of leftovers in the fridge.

So I served olive bread with tapenade and proscuitto, butternut squash soup, turkey, mushroom gravy, roesti potatoes, braised red cabbage with blueberries, eggplant, Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish, spiced peaches and chocolate cranberry pie for dessert. There were chocolate chip scones for breakfast. Let me know if you would like me to post any of these recipes!!

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« Reply #47 on: December 26, 2007, 01:54:31 pm »

How did you like your holiday menus this year?

At Front-Ranger's we had a simpler feast than previous years. We are planning to go out of town for New Year's and we didn't want a bunch of leftovers in the fridge.

So I served olive bread with tapenade and proscuitto, butternut squash soup, turkey, mushroom gravy, roesti potatoes, braised red cabbage with blueberries, eggplant, Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish, spiced peaches and chocolate cranberry pie for dessert. There were chocolate chip scones for breakfast. Let me know if you would like me to post any of these recipes!!

Front-Ranger -- that sounds like a very elegant spread! The olive bread sounds yummy! May we see that recipe?

Where are the Rangers heading for New Year's if you don't mind telling us. ?
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« Reply #48 on: December 26, 2007, 05:28:51 pm »

Front-Ranger -- that sounds like a very elegant spread! The olive bread sounds yummy! May we see that recipe?

Where are the Rangers heading for New Year's if you don't mind telling us. ?

I will dig it out for y'all!!

We are heading to Arizona...we haven't yet recovered from LAST winter in Denver, much less this one!! We'll be back on the 1st, and I'll check in between sessions in the spa!!

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« Reply #49 on: December 04, 2008, 03:02:18 pm »

Time to think about the holiday menu!! What are you planning on putting on the table, everyone??
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« Reply #50 on: December 04, 2008, 03:06:57 pm »

My son always wants to go to this really good butcher shop near here and get ducks.

But my grocery store had a two-for-one special on hams, so I have a couple. And if I get lazy ...  Smiley
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« Reply #51 on: December 04, 2008, 05:53:59 pm »

And if you get lazy, buy the duck and say to your son, have at it, knock yourself out! (oops sorry for the violent expression!!)

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« Reply #52 on: December 04, 2008, 05:58:39 pm »

And if you get lazy, buy the duck and say to your son, have at it, knock yourself out! (oops sorry for the violent expression!!)

To his credit, when he gets interested in a meal like that, he often does participate in a lot of the cooking.

But I'm looking forward to the day when he can drive himself to the butcher shop, select and pay for the duck, bring it home prepare it, serve it, and clean up the kitchen afterward.

Is that asking too much? Don't answer that.  laugh


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« Reply #53 on: December 04, 2008, 06:12:03 pm »

To his credit, when he gets interested in a meal like that, he often does participate in a lot of the cooking.

But I'm looking forward to the day when he can drive himself to the butcher shop, select and pay for the duck, bring it home prepare it, serve it, and clean up the kitchen afterward.

Is that asking too much? Don't answer that.  laugh

Have faith, friend, it can happen! It did happen to my daughter. She was the messiest cook, and always requiring lots of exotic ingredients. But after living away from home for a year and in another country (cooking for her roommates) for several months, she came back home and is now a completely resourceful, autonomous, and considerate cook!! And, she also grows herbs and makes wine and mead as well!! I am so proud.
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« Reply #54 on: December 05, 2008, 03:54:23 am »

Your 2007 menu sounds so good, Lee.  Could you tell about the potatoes, please.
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« Reply #55 on: December 07, 2008, 05:12:31 pm »

Oh yes, I love those roesti potatoes. It's a Swiss recipe. Here is how James Beard did it:

I find that boiling good-sized potatoes in their jackets for 10 minutes, then peeling them, is a fine idea. (Yukon potatoes are best)
Grate them coarsely and form them into a large cake. Sauté in 6 to 8 tablespoons butter till they are exquisitely brown and crusty on the bottom.
Invert the pan on a plate, add more butter to the pan, and slip the uncooked side into the pan. Cook the potatoes over medium heat till they are crusted on the other side. Add salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.
These may also be made with raw potatoes or cold baked potatoes grated coarsely.

You can of course use olive oil instead. I also add some fines herbs. They look like a big pancake, and you cut it into pie wedges to serve it.
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« Reply #56 on: December 07, 2008, 09:43:13 pm »

Oh yes, I love those roesti potatoes. It's a Swiss recipe. Here is how James Beard did it:

I find that boiling good-sized potatoes in their jackets for 10 minutes, then peeling them, is a fine idea. (Yukon potatoes are best)
Grate them coarsely and form them into a large cake. Sauté in 6 to 8 tablespoons butter till they are exquisitely brown and crusty on the bottom.
Invert the pan on a plate, add more butter to the pan, and slip the uncooked side into the pan. Cook the potatoes over medium heat till they are crusted on the other side. Add salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.
These may also be made with raw potatoes or cold baked potatoes grated coarsely.

You can of course use olive oil instead. I also add some fines herbs. They look like a big pancake, and you cut it into pie wedges to serve it.


That's what I want right now.


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« Reply #57 on: December 17, 2009, 01:35:16 pm »

Need some help with my holiday menus!! Because there will be some kosher-keeping people and some finicky people at my table this year, I won't be able to serve any pork, shellfish, or fish. No scallop empanada, which I traditionally serve for Christmas Eve dinner. That's not so big a problem...I am planning to put smoked turkey and duck into the empanada instead. Problem fixed! Then, for Christmas dinner, I will have a standing rib roast, like Leslie serves. I haven't served beef for Christmas dinner in ages, but it seems to be the right thing to do this year with beef such a bargain. I take two large beef rib roasts, trim them, and stand them up in a circle in a pan and tie them. Drizzle them with a little olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic, and other spices, and broil them till they're done. In the middle of the crown roast, I would like to pile brussels sprouts, but my mother recoiled at the very mention. So I've come up with a melange of portobello mushrooms, new potatoes, and pearl onions. Hope that will work. Side dishes will include some kind of yam souffle, whole wheat rolls (recipe in the Moosewood Classics cookbook), Paul's cranberry relish, Cumberland Sauce, and a salad with oranges, kiwis, and pomegranate seeds. Dessert will be chocolate silk pie with whipped cream, and grapes and cheeses. Let me know your suggestions for other things, particularly appetizers. I can't think of an appetizer that doesn't have ham, prosciutto, or shellfish in it!!
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« Reply #58 on: December 17, 2009, 02:13:44 pm »

You could serve a Philadelphia appetizer, Cheese Whiz on Ritz crackers. ...  laugh
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« Reply #59 on: December 17, 2009, 02:27:03 pm »

You could serve a Philadelphia appetizer, Cheese Whiz on Ritz crackers. ...  laugh

If I did that, my kids would gobble them all up and not have any room for dinner!!
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« Reply #60 on: December 17, 2009, 03:21:44 pm »

Wow, Lee, that's quite a meal! 

As for appetizers, I would keep it simple, given what's to come.  Maybe some crudités and a simple dip (I recently had a hummus flavored with harissa).  Also, I think chicken liver paté is reasonably kosher, and very good with cornichons. 

While whole-wheat rolls sound good, I always like popovers with beef.
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« Reply #61 on: December 17, 2009, 03:41:44 pm »

Please snap some shots of your dinner, if you can, Lee!
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« Reply #62 on: December 17, 2009, 05:41:18 pm »

Hi Lee. Don't know to what degree your guests are keeping kosher, but if they really are, you can't serve any cream, whipped or not, for dessert.

Also, there's no kosher reason you can't serve fish, as long as it's a kosher fish, which actually most fishes are.

And as for the meat, if your kosher guests are going to eat it, it has to be kosher.
And if they are, no dairy products  in any of the other dishes they are supposed to eat!

If your guests are very  kosher, they won't eat the food, even if kosher, that's been cooked in your pots and pans. In that case, you can use disposable aluminium tins to cook in the oven.

Any more questions, you're welcome to ask.

Best wishes

Sonja's kosher advice agency.  laugh
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« Reply #63 on: December 17, 2009, 06:45:13 pm »

Thanks for all your thoughts, friends! It has been great cooking today...I have kept my computer on the kitchen counter, just out of reach of flying food, lol (it is a white Mac after all). Great suggestion on the crudities Paul, that's exactly what I'll do. I have never had the courage to do popovers at this altitude, and my oven is a little temperamental, so it's somehting I'll have to try for a family dinner first.

Sason, my guests are just kosher in certain areas. They won't eat any pork or shellfish, but they love all dairy foods. My daughter explained to me that the prohibition against eating dairy foods with meat was a historical thing brought on by economics...it was not a good idea to eat the young animals but instead they should be raised to maturity first. (It sounded to me like a bit of rationalization, but I'm not complaining!)

Another thing is that, although fish are kosher, I can't serve it since one of my other guests hates fish of any kind; in fact she has to leave the house if she smells fish. It takes all kinds I guess.
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« Reply #64 on: December 17, 2009, 10:46:48 pm »

If your guests are very  kosher, they won't eat the food, even if kosher, that's been cooked in your pots and pans. In that case, you can use disposable aluminium tins to cook in the oven.

Oy! If I had guests like that, the only thing I'd make for dinner would be ... reservations.

At a kosher restaurant, of course. ...  Wink
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« Reply #65 on: December 18, 2009, 03:01:18 pm »

Oy! If I had guests like that, the only thing I'd make for dinner would be ... reservations.

At a kosher restaurant, of course. ...  Wink

 Cheesy

That's a good solution IMO, if you live somewhere where there are kosher restaurants around.

I had an uncle, now long gone, who brought his own food when he came to visit my parents.
He was a very modest and unassuming man, happy to come for a visit, just didn't eat anything
unless he was 200% sure it was absolutely kosher. To each his own.....
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« Reply #66 on: December 18, 2009, 03:09:57 pm »

Cheesy

That's a good solution IMO, if you live somewhere where there are kosher restaurants around.

I had an uncle, now long gone, who brought his own food when he came to visit my parents.
He was a very modest and unassuming man, happy to come for a visit, just didn't eat anything
unless he was 200% sure it was absolutely kosher. To each his own.....

Oh, I do. There is even a restaurant near my home that's described as glat kosher. I don't really know what that means, but I assume it's something like "super kosher."
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« Reply #67 on: December 18, 2009, 03:14:24 pm »

Oh, I do. There is even a restaurant near my home that's described as glat kosher. I don't really know what that means, but I assume it's something like "super kosher."

Yeah, some people think glatt kosher is the real thing. Others think that kosher is kosher, there are no degrees. Either it's kosher or it's not.

Sounds like you're well equipped for all kinds of guests!  Grin
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« Reply #68 on: December 18, 2009, 08:44:20 pm »

Will they eat off your plates and forks that have had both dairy and meat on them?  Will they sit at a table that is serving meat and cheese at the same meal?

Best wishes to you all.  My mom and sister are coming to our vegetarian household for the week of Christmas, some similarity, although they are the ones who have to be more flexible, which we appreciate.  And we do make reservations so that people can get their fixes.

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« Reply #69 on: November 17, 2010, 09:40:37 pm »

In the newspaper today, the question was asked, How would you prepare a nontraditional Thanksgiving? I'm all for the traditional approach (with a few upgrades) but I enjoyed reading about the answers, especially this from our only (as far as I know) Scottish gastropub in Denver, Argyl:

Fruition Farms sheep's milk ricotta and orange-stuffed dates, wrapped in bacon and baked

Colorado hops smoked whole trout stuffed with risotto-style barley and mushrooms

Lamb "steamship": Leg of lamb with garlic and rosemary, studded with black peppercorns and red wine

Pappardelle pasta with wild mushrooms, butternut squash, pine-nuts and sage

Potato & celery root puree

Cauliflower and Brussels sprouts gratin with pepitas and Colorouge cheese

Haricot vert (green beans) with smoked paprika and almonds

Cream cheese and chipotle cornbread (see denverpost.com/recipes)

Pumpkin bread pudding with chai spiced ice cream, hazelnut brittle and cinnamon apple chutney


Read more: Slaying the sacred turkey: Imagining a world without the traditional feast - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/food/ci_16621556#ixzz15asgNVNa
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse
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« Reply #70 on: November 18, 2010, 03:24:38 pm »

That menu sounds yummi!!!
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« Reply #71 on: November 20, 2010, 01:23:54 am »


Pappardelle pasta with wild mushrooms, butternut squash, pine-nuts and sage



On the subject of pine nuts - I just found out this week, the hard way, about that horrible problem of long lasting bitterness in the mouth which starts a day or two after you eat certain varieties of pine nuts.  Mine started Tuesday, the day after I had some in a rice casserole.  The condition has been non-stop since then and has spoiled the flavor of everything I've eaten.  Apparently, it can last for weeks, although at least no one has identified any actual health hazards from it.  Seemingly, the problem has been all over the Internet the last two years as more and more people experience it in the US and Europe, but I somehow missed out.

They are not really positive which varieties it is, although they are leaning toward a small variety from China, packaged either by itself or added to Chinese blends.  Some sources are claiming these are not even nuts from pinyon pines, like other pine nuts, they are from a variety of Chinese white pine. 

That is the conclusion of the Wikipedia article on pine nuts at least.

The ones I bought were in fact small, no longer than sunflower seeds although rounder and fatter.

But I missed out on the general articles, like this one:

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/pine-mouth-pine-nuts-leave-bitter-taste-lingers/story?id=11097222&page=1

I reported the problem back to the store where I got them and to the Food and Drug Administration which I read was investigating the issue.  Unfortunately I know the FDA does not have enough information yet to be able to simply ban pine nuts from specific sources. 

Well, I won't be putting on any extra weight over Thanksgiving at least!




 
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« Reply #72 on: November 20, 2010, 01:49:41 am »

Poor Andrew!  I hope it goes away soon.  Sad

Thanks for letting us know about the pine nuts.  I've never heard of that problem.  Scary!  Tongue
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« Reply #73 on: November 20, 2010, 12:18:11 pm »

Wow, that is weird! Well, it's just walnuts for me in pesto, from now on. I'm not a huge pine-nut fan, anyway.

Though it is tempting to TRY to get pine mouth as a diet aid ...  Roll Eyes


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« Reply #74 on: November 20, 2010, 07:00:24 pm »

Poor Andrew! Sounds like a PIA.   Angry

This is total news to me, I've never heard of it before.

I very seldom eat pine nuts, but I actually had some today, what a coincidence!

But they weren't from China, so I hope I'll be ok.

Hope you'll be ok soon, too.
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« Reply #75 on: November 20, 2010, 07:27:47 pm »

Wow, that is weird! Well, it's just walnuts for me in pesto, from now on. I'm not a huge pine-nut fan, anyway.

Though it is tempting to TRY to get pine mouth as a diet aid ...  Roll Eyes

Heh. I can remember a news report, maybe about ten years ago, about a woman who died from eating pesto; it turned out she was allergic to pine nuts.
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« Reply #76 on: November 20, 2010, 11:43:19 pm »

I stopped in a store tonight and the clerk was just digging into a dinner of what looked like hummus that had some things sprinkled on top, and it looked like they could have been pine nuts. It was all I could do not to yell "Sssssttttttoopppppp!" in slow motion and lunge across the room to knock  the food out of her hand.

But I didn't want to wreck her dinner unnecessarily. So I shrugged, made my purchase, and left.

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« Reply #77 on: November 21, 2010, 12:49:15 pm »

Thanks for the sympathy, all !  I am not miserable, it is just an annoyance.  I mostly wanted to sound the alert as we are going into the holidays and menus are being finalized.   And for most people, food flavors are one of the first pleasures of life.  Actually, food is usually discussed in Thanksgiving kitchens and dining rooms, too, so I was hoping the word would get spread even further.  If I had read about it I might have decided to hold off on pine nuts for a year or two till they established definitively what is the source of the ones which have this effect. 

One thing they know is that it is not like an allergy which only affects some people.  I have always eaten them and never had any problem; all the complaints to the FDA are coming from the last couple of years.

It reminds you how hard it is to find out where anything you eat comes from.   I did get a response from the supermarket, that they would investigate the source of the ones I bought right away.   But the problem is, you don't know at the time you buy, which is true even for most products from most health food stores.  For some people, it would even be a selling point that they were buying American pinyon nuts harvested by Native Americans, or Italian or other Mediterranean ones from the Stone Pine, which have been eaten since prehistoric times.   For now, if people can't get that information, the best they can do with the limited information available is to get big ones - and of course, the more expensive ones are more likely to have originated in the US or Europe. 
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« Reply #78 on: November 21, 2010, 02:06:27 pm »

Maybe it's some pesicide they spray on the trees in China? Or on the nuts after harvest.

They aren't exactly known to try to achieve a high level of environmental friendliness.... Undecided
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« Reply #79 on: November 24, 2010, 11:37:08 am »

The new issue of Cooking Light has a recipe for pine-nut cookies. NooooooooooooOO!!!



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« Reply #80 on: November 26, 2010, 03:59:55 pm »

Back to menus:  

Here was the menu for Thanksgiving in the South End:

With drinks:  three cheeses (tangy goat, crumbly cheddar, gooey mont d'or), crab dip, nuts.

Main course:
Roast turkey--organic, walk-around, chemical-free from Vermont (best I ever had).
Stuffing/dressing--bread and sausage with lots of celery and sage, and one for vegetarians.
Gravy made from giblets simmered in red wine.
Onions that were roasted with the turkey.
Butternut squash purée with maple syrup and sour cream, topped with caramelized onions.
Eastham turnip purée (kind of like a rutabaga, pure white and peppery).
Steamed and sautéed haricots verts.
Cranberry-clementine-ginger relish.

Wine:  Stephen Vincent "Crimson"

Dessert:
Homemade mincemeat pies.
Very strong coffee.

For the weekend:  turkey consommé made from the bones.  Yum.


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« Reply #81 on: November 26, 2010, 04:11:37 pm »

Sounds YUMMI!!!

I'm a bit confused by the mincemeat.  I suppose it isn't meat, but what is it?
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« Reply #82 on: November 26, 2010, 04:57:15 pm »

Sounds YUMMI!!!

I'm a bit confused by the mincemeat.  I suppose it isn't meat, but what is it?

I think mincemeat originally contained meat, and/or beef suet.  But, nowadays, most versions contain seasoned, chopped dried fruit (like raisins, currants, dates, prunes, orange peel spiced with cinnamon, cloves, mace, nutmeg).  Often mixed with brandy and baked in a pie.  
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« Reply #83 on: November 26, 2010, 05:04:55 pm »

Mmmmm --- sounds delicious!!

Any nuts in the mixture?
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« Reply #84 on: November 26, 2010, 05:06:19 pm »

Mmmmm --- sounds delicious!!

Any nuts in the mixture?

No nuts.  It has enough texture on its own. 

I hated it as a kid, probably too strong, but now I love it.  In fact, I had a little piece for breakfast today.
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« Reply #85 on: November 26, 2010, 05:49:14 pm »

Thanks for the South End menu, Paul.  I was wondering how our resident gourmet chef would celebrate Turkey Day.  Sounds wonderful!  Cool

I had pie for breakfast, too, of course.  A rare treat:  homemade apple pie made with Macoun and Empire apples and a buttery crust.  Oh boy!  Cool
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« Reply #86 on: December 24, 2010, 06:05:20 pm »

I just finished a mince-cranberry pie for tomorrow's dinner. I found that the mincemeat you buy in a jar has no beef suet in it, in fact, no meat of any kind. Therefore, I can serve it when my sortof kosher daughter and her son visit. I fortified the mincemeat with some special golden raisins I have been macerating in brandy for a fortnight or so.

I was thinking of serving the pie with vanilla ice cream...Paul, what do you think? It has a crust on top.

For your homemade mince pie, did you use beef suet? It's surprisingly hard to get. You have to order it from a butcher in advance around these parts.
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« Reply #87 on: December 24, 2010, 10:34:03 pm »

Mmm, I'm sure golden raisins and cranberries will brighten up any store-bought mincemeat.

I think beef is not necessary in any form.

Vanilla ice cream is always a welcome with pie.  Another option would be ginger ice cream.  Yum. 
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« Reply #88 on: December 24, 2010, 10:42:14 pm »

Here's the Christmas menu for tomorrow:

Drinks with Joey's gougeres (extraordinary cheese puffs), patés--venison and mousse truffée.

Savenor's Market best rack of lamb crusted with juniper berries, garlic, rosemary, black pepper, dijon mustard, breadcrumbs. Rosy rare.
Gratin of potato and celery root.
Little haricots verts.

Barolo for wine.

Again, homemade mincemeat pies, because everyone loves them.
Very strong coffee.
Dark chocolate covered orange peel from La Maison du Chocolat.
10 year tawny port, Taylor Fladgate.
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« Reply #89 on: December 25, 2010, 02:30:31 am »

Mmm, I'm sure golden raisins and cranberries will brighten up any store-bought mincemeat.

I think beef is not necessary in any form.

Vanilla ice cream is always a welcome with pie.  Another option would be ginger ice cream.  Yum. 

I think ginger ice cream might be do-able! Thanks for the inspiration, friend! Enjoy your dinner!!
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« Reply #90 on: December 25, 2010, 02:42:37 am »

Here's the Christmas menu for tomorrow:

Drinks with Joey's gougeres (extraordinary cheese puffs), patés--venison and mousse truffée.

Savenor's Market best rack of lamb crusted with juniper berries, garlic, rosemary, black pepper, dijon mustard, breadcrumbs. Rosy rare.
Gratin of potato and celery root.
Little haricots verts.

Barolo for wine.

Again, homemade mincemeat pies, because everyone loves them.
Very strong coffee.
Dark chocolate covered orange peel from La Maison du Chocolat.
10 year tawny port, Taylor Fladgate.

Wow.  And Barolo, too.  You are definitely going to have a Merry Christmas, Paul!  Cool Kiss
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« Reply #91 on: December 25, 2010, 05:47:22 am »

Here's the Christmas menu for tomorrow:

Drinks with Joey's gougeres (extraordinary cheese puffs), patés--venison and mousse truffée.

Savenor's Market best rack of lamb crusted with juniper berries, garlic, rosemary, black pepper, dijon mustard, breadcrumbs. Rosy rare.
Gratin of potato and celery root.
Little haricots verts.

Barolo for wine.

Again, homemade mincemeat pies, because everyone loves them.
Very strong coffee.
Dark chocolate covered orange peel from La Maison du Chocolat.
10 year tawny port, Taylor Fladgate.


You know, if there weren't already a thousand other reasons, your culinary skills and gourmet disposition would be reason enough to marry you. The guys ought to queue up! I know I would. And I would happily gain another 10 pounds, lol. laugh
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« Reply #92 on: December 25, 2010, 08:55:40 am »

Here's the Christmas menu for tomorrow:

Drinks with Joey's gougeres (extraordinary cheese puffs), patés--venison and mousse truffée.

Savenor's Market best rack of lamb crusted with juniper berries, garlic, rosemary, black pepper, dijon mustard, breadcrumbs. Rosy rare.
Gratin of potato and celery root.
Little haricots verts.

Barolo for wine.

Again, homemade mincemeat pies, because everyone loves them.
Very strong coffee.
Dark chocolate covered orange peel from La Maison du Chocolat.
10 year tawny port, Taylor Fladgate.

Sounds divine.

(barring the wine and coffee, of course  Grin)
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« Reply #93 on: December 25, 2010, 11:16:45 pm »

Here's what I ended up serving today:

First, for brunch, I arranged on the sideboard yogurt (several varieties, including limited editions of cranberry apple, pumpkin pie, etc.) fresh fruit, including pineapple, grapefruit, pear, kiwi, strawberries, and blueberries, cinnamon rolls, juice, and strata (an Italian dish consisting of eggs, milk, fresh nutmeg, bread, spinach, poached shredded chicken, and cheese.

Then, after a break to open presents, I served appetizers including pumpkin seeds, hummus with crusty bread, deviled eggs and trout baked in salt “La Sara”. This is the abode of Nathalie Waag, a partner of Julia Child. I often prepare recipes of hers. The entree included Stuffed Mushrooms in tomato sauce, roast Lamb with garlic/bay/clove boats and Cumberland Sauce, Tabouli Salad, Sweet-sour Onions, artichoke and preserved lemons garnishing the lamb, Semolina cakes and Cranberry Sauce. The dessert was mince cranberry pie with Vanilla Ice Cream, crystallized ginger, and butterscotch Cookies.

The wine we served was not special. It was a Kendall Jackson 2006 Syrah. It complemented the lamb well.
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« Reply #94 on: December 26, 2010, 11:01:59 am »

Wow.  And Barolo, too.  You are definitely going to have a Merry Christmas, Paul!  Cool Kiss

Thanks, Meryl.  Everything turned out great.  The Barolo was a real find--inexpensive and good!  I hope yours was merry too.


You know, if there weren't already a thousand other reasons, your culinary skills and gourmet disposition would be reason enough to marry you. The guys ought to queue up! I know I would. And I would happily gain another 10 pounds, lol. laugh

Haha!  Thanks, Chrissi.   Kiss

Sounds divine.

(barring the wine and coffee, of course  Grin)

Wine and coffee are essential!
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« Reply #95 on: December 26, 2010, 11:02:53 am »

So, Lee, how was the pie?

I just had a piece for breakfast.
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« Reply #96 on: December 26, 2010, 07:06:18 pm »

Thanks, Meryl.  Everything turned out great.  The Barolo was a real find--inexpensive and good!  I hope yours was merry too

It was indeed merry.  Our circle of close friends gathered at my friend Leslie's and had a yummy brunch and exchanged presents.  I made a coffee cake from the Weight Watchers website that got raves.  Then I trekked to Brooklyn to the home of a colleague and had another great meal and got to meet his four new kittens (he and his partner were too soft-hearted to not adopt the whole litter).  Very nice!  Cool
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« Reply #97 on: December 26, 2010, 07:40:24 pm »

So, Lee, how was the pie?

It was excellent...especially the extra-macerated raisins I fortified it with! I served it with vanilla ice cream sprinkled with crystallized ginger. Those little sprinkles really made the dessert truly special!! Thanks again for the advice!
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« Reply #98 on: December 31, 2010, 03:39:30 pm »

New Years again.

I got my black-eyed peas, collard greens, sausage (instead of ham) and I'll be picking up some bread after I work out tonight.  Not cornbread though.

Anyone else?
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« Reply #99 on: December 31, 2010, 05:15:10 pm »

New Years again.

I got my black-eyed peas, collard greens, sausage (instead of ham) and I'll be picking up some bread after I work out tonight.  Not cornbread though.

Anyone else?

I bought boneless pork chops at the grocery store this morning. I already had potatoes for mashed potatoes and a can of sauerkraut, so I'll have my pork and sauerkraut with mashed potatoes.

Technically, I guess, for me to be a good Pennsylvania Dutchman, it should be roast pork with sauerkraut, instead of baked pork chops, but I have yet to roast anything in my life, and I'm not inclined to start tomorrrow!  laugh
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« Reply #100 on: December 31, 2010, 08:32:54 pm »

I got my black-eyed peas, collard greens, sausage (instead of ham) and I'll be picking up some bread after I work out tonight.  Not cornbread though.

I bought boneless pork chops at the grocery store this morning. I already had potatoes for mashed potatoes and a can of sauerkraut, so I'll have my pork and sauerkraut with mashed potatoes.

Mmm, sounds good!  I may make up a batch of my Mom's navy beans and ham to start the New Year with a bang!  Grin
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« Reply #101 on: December 31, 2010, 08:37:03 pm »

I'm going all New Age-y with a chick pea and parsley soup. The parsley is from a pot in my sunroom...first year I've ever been able to grow parsley inside. Rounding that out is a pot roast that's been simmering since this morning, with onions, bay leaves (from sunroom) and black fungi (Chinese mushrooms, in other words). Challah made by my Jew-ish daughter. Gingerbread butterscotch cookies with Crown Royal.

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« Reply #102 on: December 31, 2010, 08:48:01 pm »

I'm going all New Age-y with a chick pea and parsley soup. The parsley is from a pot in my sunroom...first year I've ever been able to grow parsley inside. Rounding that out is a pot roast that's been simmering since this morning, with onions, bay leaves (from sunroom) and black fungi (Chinese mushrooms, in other words). Challah made by my Jew-ish daughter. Gingerbread butterscotch cookies with Crown Royal.

I was with you, until hereTongue  Don't you know gingerbread butterscotch calls for something light - like a vin santo?  laugh
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« Reply #103 on: December 31, 2010, 09:24:15 pm »

New Year's Eve menu in Provincetown:

Seared Hudson Valley foie gras with poached pears, brioche toast and port wine reduction.

Miso-glazed Chilean sea bass with baby bok choi, black sesame rice cake and lobster tail.

Chocolate pot de creme with a glass of champagne. 

Lots of great hugs and kisses from friends. 
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« Reply #104 on: December 31, 2010, 11:10:38 pm »

New Year's Eve menu in Provincetown:

Seared Hudson Valley foie gras with poached pears, brioche toast and port wine reduction.

Miso-glazed Chilean sea bass with baby bok choi, black sesame rice cake and lobster tail.

Chocolate pot de creme with a glass of champagne. 

Lots of great hugs and kisses from friends. 

Are y'all at Mewes?

*jealous here with my popcorn and wine*

 Wink
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« Reply #105 on: December 31, 2010, 11:27:26 pm »

New Year's Eve menu in Provincetown:

Seared Hudson Valley foie gras with poached pears, brioche toast and port wine reduction.

Miso-glazed Chilean sea bass with baby bok choi, black sesame rice cake and lobster tail.

Chocolate pot de creme with a glass of champagne. 

Lots of great hugs and kisses from friends. 

 Shocked

SERIOUS welcome to the New Year.  Nom nom nom.
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« Reply #106 on: December 31, 2010, 11:56:13 pm »


Miso-glazed Chilean sea bass

Oh, you mean Patagonian toothfish?  Roll Eyes

Happy New Year, friend!
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« Reply #107 on: January 01, 2011, 05:50:09 am »

I'm going all New Age-y with a chick pea and parsley soup. The parsley is from a pot in my sunroom...first year I've ever been able to grow parsley inside. Rounding that out is a pot roast that's been simmering since this morning, with onions, bay leaves (from sunroom) and black fungi (Chinese mushrooms, in other words). Challah made by my Jew-ish daughter. Gingerbread butterscotch cookies with Crown Royal.

OMG, that all sounds wonderful!  Cheesy
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« Reply #108 on: January 01, 2011, 11:32:52 am »

Are y'all at Mewes?

*jealous here with my popcorn and wine*

 Wink

Where else?! It's our "Cheers". 

Shocked

SERIOUS welcome to the New Year.  Nom nom nom.

Nom nom is right!


Oh, you mean Patagonian toothfish?  Roll Eyes

Happy New Year, friend!

Whatever it was, it was good.  Happy New Year to you!
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« Reply #109 on: January 01, 2011, 11:35:07 am »

Where else?! It's our "Cheers". ...

See, if I'd been there, I would have had the risotto and spilled my wine.  Twice a tradition does make, methinks.   laugh

Happy New Year, Paul!!
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« Reply #110 on: January 01, 2011, 02:58:14 pm »

I may make up a batch of my Mom's navy beans and ham to start the New Year with a bang!  Grin

Is that a soup, Meryl? In any case, ham and beans are good!  Cheesy
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« Reply #111 on: January 01, 2011, 03:08:51 pm »

Is that a soup, Meryl? In any case, ham and beans are good!  Cheesy

It's kind of a main dish and a soup, Jeff.  If you like it soupy, you can always add more liquid.  We used to have it for supper a lot when I was a kid.  Here's the recipe:

http://bettermost.net/forum/index.php/topic,6191.msg117596.html#msg117596

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« Reply #112 on: January 01, 2011, 03:15:07 pm »

It's kind of a main dish and a soup, Jeff.  If you like it soupy, you can always add more liquid.  We used to have it for supper a lot when I was a kid.  Here's the recipe:

http://bettermost.net/forum/index.php/topic,6191.msg117596.html#msg117596

Thanks! Reminds me a lot of what my mother used to make, but she always used dried lima beans, and she didn't use chicken broth. I remember her soaking the beans overnight preceding the day she wanted to cook them. The result was kind of soupy without actually being "bean soup"--she used navy beans for bean soup--and was more of a stew.
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« Reply #113 on: January 02, 2011, 01:21:18 pm »

I make a dish like that in the slow-cooker. I've made it with limas, with kidneys, with black-eyed peas, with lentils, with bags of mixed beans (all dried, all soaked overnight, except for the black eyes and lentils, which don't require soaking). Sometimes I use bacon instead of ham. Sometimes I use ham hocks, which are cheap and give it a wonderful smoky flavor. Sometimes I add a can of chopped tomatoes or tomato sauce (but only after the beans have softened -- the acid in the tomatoes will keep them from softening).

What I love about the slow-cooker is you don't have to be in the house while it's cooking, and it gives you a lot of latitude as to when it's finished cooking. Usually it will say something like, "cook on low for 6 to 8 hours," which means if you put it in at noon you can eat anytime from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

I made a ham for Christmas. We didn't quite finish it, so I tossed the rest, including the bone, into the freezer. Sometime next week, probably, I'll thaw it out and throw it in the slow-cooker for a big pot o' beans.

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« Reply #114 on: January 02, 2011, 08:30:51 pm »

Sounds great, Katherine!  I had my beans for supper with black bread and a beer.  That's good eatin'!
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« Reply #115 on: November 19, 2011, 01:39:14 pm »

It's T minus four days! Is anyone doing a themed Thanksgiving this year? There was a native feast in WSJ's Off-Duty section today...I like to include some native American ingredients, but that's as far as it goes in my house.
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« Reply #116 on: November 20, 2011, 09:24:21 pm »

On track with the Thanksgiving prep! I always work backwards. Completed a cranberry mincemeat pie today. I wanted a low-key pie that wouldn't compete with the pumpkin pie my daughter in law is bringing over. I think this is perfect...and so easy!

Also completed some side dishes: spiced peaches and sweet/sour onions. Obtained brussels sprouts, which I will roast, and all ingredients for the stuffing.

Potential problem: the 20-lb turkey that has been defrosting in the garage since Thursday night is still rock hard! I won't get my feathers ruffled over this.

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« Reply #117 on: November 21, 2011, 10:09:13 am »

Your "daughter-in-law"?  Huh?

I had a hankering for brussels sprouts, but there were none to be had at the grocery story on Friday, except for frozen ones, which are a mushy abomination.  Huh?
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« Reply #118 on: November 21, 2011, 01:59:25 pm »

I tried pumpkin pie for the first time when I was in Chicago last week.

It reminded me a lot of a Swedish cake called 'mjuk pepparkaka', "soft gingerbread'. Same spices.

I'm glad I tried it, but I don't feel like I need to have it again.
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« Reply #119 on: November 23, 2011, 01:29:37 am »

Your "daughter-in-law"?  Huh?
Jeff, that would be my daughter's husband's sister. Sason, pumpkin pie is so de rigeur here that it is almost religious!

I had a hankering for brussels sprouts, but there were none to be had at the grocery story on Friday, except for frozen ones, which are a mushy abomination.  Huh?
I agree with you about the frozen brussels sprouts. I finally found some fresh ones, and I greedily acquired nearly 2 lbs. of them. I trimmed them tonight and they are all ready to be roasted on Thursday. Yay!
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« Reply #120 on: November 23, 2011, 01:35:16 am »

On track with the Thanksgiving prep! I always work backwards. Completed a cranberry mincemeat pie today. I wanted a low-key pie that wouldn't compete with the pumpkin pie my daughter in law is bringing over. I think this is perfect...and so easy!

Also completed some side dishes: spiced peaches and sweet/sour onions. Obtained brussels sprouts, which I will roast, and all ingredients for the stuffing.

Potential problem: the 20-lb turkey that has been defrosting in the garage since Thursday night is still rock hard! I won't get my feathers ruffled over this.

I made a lot of progress tonight. I cleaned the entire kitchen, put a leaf in the table, cleaned and dusted the dining room, decorated, and prepared the stuffing and a couple of side dishes. Also, the turkey has thawed. I cleaned it out and it is now brining. My son polished the silver, dispatched a whole pomegranate whose seeds will be used in the salad, and promised to shut down the sports supply store that is our front foyer. I'm totally ready for Thanksgiving!!!!!
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« Reply #121 on: November 23, 2011, 11:36:31 am »

Sason, pumpkin pie is so de rigeur here that it is almost religious!


Yeah, I kinda figured that. That's why I wanted to try it!

They waitress did look a bit puzzled when I said to Linda, "Oh, they have pumpkin pie on the menu, I've never tried that."

Linda gave me a look and told the waitress, "She's from Sweden".  laugh laugh
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« Reply #122 on: November 23, 2011, 09:05:20 pm »

I tried pumpkin pie for the first time when I was in Chicago last week.

It reminded me a lot of a Swedish cake called 'mjuk pepparkaka', "soft gingerbread'. Same spices.

I'm glad I tried it, but I don't feel like I need to have it again.

I'm surprised pumpkin pies aren't popular where you live. Pumpkins are definitely a cold-climate crop, and since they're kind of sweetish, so to speak, you'd think they'd be a natural for pies in every culture.


I'm going to a friend's gathering and bringing roasted cranberry sauce from Saveur: . A friend of mine had Thanksgiving a week early, made this, and she and her daughter both said it was really good. So I'm counting on their expertise.


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« Reply #123 on: November 23, 2011, 09:48:30 pm »

I'm making the stuffing tomorrow, and I found a recipe for making it in the crockpot.  A good idea, I think.  It'll free up the oven and also stay nice and moist.  It's also from the Calgary Herald, so how great is that?  Cool

http://www.food.com/recipe/crock-pot-stuffing-49609

Crock Pot Stuffing

By Dib's on December 22, 2002

    Prep Time: 10 mins
    Total Time: 3 hrs 10 mins
    Servings: 10


"Here's a Crock-Pot stuffing recipe I found in the Calgary Herald and thought I'd share it. I'm going to use it for Christmas with the vegetable stock for my vegetarian so I will add my comments after Christmas."

Ingredients

        2 cups chopped onions
        1 1/2 cups thinly sliced celery
        1 cup diced tart apples, peeled and cored
        1/4 cup butter
        1 tablespoon ground sage
        1 teaspoon ground marjoram
        1 teaspoon salt
        1 teaspoon pepper
        1/2 teaspoon savory
        1/2 teaspoon thyme
        12 cups lightly toasted bread, cubes
        1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
        1 1/2 cups chicken stock or 1 1/2 cups vegetable stock

Directions

    In a large fry pan saute onions, celery and apple in butter until onion is just translucent.
    Stir in sage, marjoram, salt, pepper, savory and thyme.
    Combine vegetable mixture with the bread cubes and parsley.
    Toss well.
    Pour stock over mixture, tossing well.
    Spoon into your crock-pot.
    Cover and cook on high for one hour.
    Reduce to low and continue cooking for 2-3 hours, stirring every hour.
    As stated, for vegetarians use vegetable stock.

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« Reply #124 on: November 24, 2011, 01:06:54 am »

What a great idea! Thanks for sharing it!
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« Reply #125 on: November 24, 2011, 03:05:38 pm »

I'm surprised pumpkin pies aren't popular where you live. Pumpkins are definitely a cold-climate crop, and since they're kind of sweetish, so to speak, you'd think they'd be a natural for pies in every culture.


I'm going to a friend's gathering and bringing roasted cranberry sauce from Saveur: . A friend of mine had Thanksgiving a week early, made this, and she and her daughter both said it was really good. So I'm counting on their expertise.




Pumpkins are a fairly new phenomenon in Sweden. There were starting to make an appearance at the same time as Halloween stuff about 10 years ago. A cultural import for commercial reasons entirely.

Since then I've seen several recipes with pumpkin, soups among others. I don't recall any pie recipes, though.
I think pie has another cultural significance in the US than in Sweden.

I once made a cake with pumpkin in it. It was no big hit.
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« Reply #126 on: December 25, 2011, 01:04:47 am »

Here's the menu for Christmas in the South End this year:

Breakfast

Tangerine juice mimosas
Buttermilk waffles from scratch
Extra-thick country bacon from the Ozarks--a special Christmas present
Wicked strong lattes

Dinner

My friend Laurence's world-famous chopped liver with whole wheat toasts and cornichons
A very ripe and gorgeous Brillat-Savarin triple creme cheese that is like buttah
Manhattans with Woodford Reserve bourbon

Roast rack of lamb, very rare, with juniper berry, garlic, rosemary, dijon mustard crust
Joey's Cape Cod Eastham turnip and potato puree
Little haricots verts sauteed with shallots
For wine, a Cotes de Ventoux from Provence

Lynne will join us for dessert:
My mom's homemade mincemeat pies infused with brandy
Joey's homemade fruitcake
Espresso
Dark chocolate-covered figs
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« Reply #127 on: December 25, 2011, 02:15:16 am »

Booking my flight now....!  Tongue  Cheesy

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« Reply #128 on: December 25, 2011, 09:38:04 am »

I'll gladly set an extra place for the Priestess!
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« Reply #129 on: December 25, 2011, 10:27:10 am »

Your menu sounds out-of-this-world YUMMY, Paul!!!
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« Reply #130 on: December 23, 2012, 07:18:29 pm »

Happy Christmas Eve Eve! I'll bet I know what a lot of my friends are doing at this time...cooking, prepping and being domestic gods and goddesses! A funny thing happened as I was reviewing this thread. I was going to write "I think I'll make a different kind of pie this year...mincemeat." But then I noticed that I have made mincemeat pie of one kind or other at least two times before and written about it!! I will certainly put shavings of crystallized ginger over the top of the vanilla ice cream on the pie as Paul suggested lo these many years ago!

So far I have made the cornbread for the stuffing (a turkey is brining in the garage) and I just may cook the stuffing in the crock pot as Meryl suggested. I've also made the cranberry dressing. Susan Stamberg's mother in law's cranberry dressing, whose recipe she repeats every year on NPR as a tradition. I've made the pastry for the mincemeat pie and I'm working on lemon shortbread cookies with lavender and also Greek grape molasses cookies. For the latter, I had to steal a fourth cup of bourbon from my husband's barrel of home-made moonshine, dump in a half teaspoon of baking soda and let it ferment for a while. Okay, it's time for your holiday menu countdown update!
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« Reply #131 on: December 24, 2012, 12:54:33 pm »

Your meal sounds yummy and creative as usual, Lee!  Hope the stuffing works out to your satisfaction.  Cool

I'm attempting my first standing rib roast tomorrow.  It was expensive as heck, so I hope I do it right!  Accompaniments are mushroom gravy, rolls, baked potatoes, salad and veggie brought by a guest, and pumpkin and lemon meringue pies.

Bon appetit, everyone!  Cool
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« Reply #132 on: December 24, 2012, 01:02:33 pm »

Mmm, I'm getting hungry! 

Lemon shortbread with lavender sounds terrific, Lee.

Good luck, Priestess, with the rib roast.

I'm sticking with my tradition, more or less, this year.  Rack of lamb with a mustard-juniper-garlic-rosemary crust, potato and celery root gratin, sauteed (almost charred) brussel sprouts, haricots verts, followed by my mother's mincemeat pies and Joey's famous fruitcake. 

Oh, and I have crock of Harrod's stilton, a souvenir of my London trip. With port and walnuts. 
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« Reply #133 on: December 24, 2012, 01:32:19 pm »

Meryl, I know your standing rib roast will be perfect! Do you use one of those oven thermometers that have a sensor that goes into the meat? I use one and it has served me well through many a meal. I tried using it one time along with the little pop-up timer that goes on the turkey, and I would have had overdone, dry turkey if I had relied on the latter!

On stuffing, people are so funny, because they dribble chicken broth on the stuffing to "moisten" it and then they are upset because the stuffing is shmushy rather than crispy! I never put water or broth on mine, simply some good butter and/or olive oil. Currently the stuffing's all cut up and ready to go into the crock pot, and my hands (and my computer keyboard) smell like rosemary and sage!
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« Reply #134 on: December 24, 2012, 01:45:35 pm »

Lee, I bought a thermometer yesterday that is long enough to get to the middle of the roast.  Fingers crossed that it works!  Cool
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« Reply #135 on: December 25, 2012, 03:48:34 am »

Good luck to everyone for your Christmas menus!
We had our traditional pork loin wrapped in bacon and baked in the oven in a cream cheese with herbs and sour cream sauce. Goes with noodles. Helen was allowed to eat the same. It's Christmas and I think two exceptions in December are okay.
We passed on the also traditional ice-cream dessert because Helen had asked us to, so the dessert was coffee and a game of crazy8s Smiley.


Today we'll be at my in-laws. I don't know what my MIL will have for us but hope for something good. Smiley
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« Reply #136 on: December 25, 2012, 04:53:54 pm »

Well, I suppose your Christmas is just about over, Chrissi! I hope you and your family had a very happy one. I just finished making Tamarind Spiced Chickpeas and Spinach while waiting for the turkey to be done. It looks and smells wonderful! That's one of the best things about Christmas...the wonderful aromas.
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« Reply #137 on: December 25, 2012, 05:11:48 pm »

Well, I suppose your Christmas is just about over, Chrissi! I hope you and your family had a very happy one.


Thank you very much, we did and still do. Christmas is not over here in Germany. We celebrate three days long, starting on Dec. 24th.
Two of three Christmas days are over, but tomorrow is another national holiday. Todays was in-laws, tomorrow is my family. Smiley



Quote
I just finished making Tamarind Spiced Chickpeas and Spinach while waiting for the turkey to be done. It looks and smells wonderful! That's one of the best things about Christmas...the wonderful aromas.

And you should be in the midst of celebrating right now! Hope you also have a lovely time with your family! Kiss
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« Reply #138 on: December 26, 2015, 01:34:31 pm »

Quick! Before the memory grows dim, please reprise your holiday menus here!
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« Reply #139 on: December 26, 2015, 01:51:46 pm »

OK, I'll go:  a nice sunny day, very warm, with windows open!

Appetizers:
-my friend Laurence's homemade chopped liver
-a fresh Brillat-Savarin cheese
-Joey's homemade gougeres (cheese puffs, yum)

Dinner:
-roast rack of lamb with mustard/garlic/rosemary/juniper berry crust
-simple string beans
-thinly sliced and charred brussel sprouts with cumin and coriander
-potato, leek and celery root gratin
-a lovely Rhone wine from my sister

Dessert:
-Joey's famous stollen
-my sister's macaroons
-mini mincemeat pies

After dinner:
-20-year tawny port
-Joey's tray of dried fruits, nuts and chocolates
-a reading from David Sedaris "Holidays on Ice"
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« Reply #140 on: December 26, 2015, 04:11:32 pm »

Sounds outstanding! I prepared leg of lamb this year. One problem I have is that when the lamb starts to brown and the drippings fall into the gravy pan, the kitchen starts to get smoky and we have to open some windows. I try to remember to put water in the gravy pan but it doesn't always take care of the problem. Anybody, like Paul, have any tips for me?
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« Reply #141 on: December 26, 2015, 09:03:02 pm »

Sounds outstanding! I prepared leg of lamb this year. One problem I have is that when the lamb starts to brown and the drippings fall into the gravy pan, the kitchen starts to get smoky and we have to open some windows. I try to remember to put water in the gravy pan but it doesn't always take care of the problem. Anybody, like Paul, have any tips for me?

Hmm, I don't often do leg of lamb, but I have two ideas:

1) Put a bunch of sliced onions in the bottom of the pan; you can add them to the gravy.

2) Cook it on an outdoor grill
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« Reply #142 on: December 27, 2015, 12:31:17 am »

Impressive menu and item-coupling Paul.  Most our friends/family wouldn't know what most of the stuff you served is & I don't know that any one of them has ever had lamb Smiley  I kept the sit down part simple: Fab shrimp cocktail, Prime Rib, Idaho bakers, and charred Brussel Sprouts which I finished in Olive Oil, garlic, and red pepper flakes. No nice Port after, but the Naked Grape Cab (in the box) was a hit.
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« Reply #143 on: December 27, 2015, 09:33:40 am »

Cheers, Brad.  I love prime rib!  Isn't is just the cow version of rack of lamb?  Do you serve it on the bone?  When I was a kid, I would always ask for the bone because our German Shepard LOVED it.

I'll share a secret:  the reason I started doing rack of lamb--it only takes about 25 minutes to cook.  Roast for 500 degrees for ten minutes, then turn down to 350 for about 15 minutes for rosy rare. I don't even put it in until all the guests have arrived. 
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« Reply #144 on: December 28, 2015, 11:23:54 am »

I didn't have any recipies this year, mom said she wanted to handle it all.
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« Reply #145 on: December 28, 2015, 01:23:02 pm »

Cheers, Brad.  I love prime rib!  Isn't is just the cow version of rack of lamb?  Do you serve it on the bone?  When I was a kid, I would always ask for the bone because our German Shepard LOVED it.

Didn't do this one on the bone but that is my preferred way (protects & keeps the meat moist). This one had Kosher salt/granulated garlic/packed whole Rosemary crust.
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« Reply #146 on: November 21, 2016, 10:38:59 pm »

The challenge I have every year is finding cornichons, which are de rigueur for holiday meals IMHO. This year, I only had to go to four places to find them! And most of these stores are the size of a football field! Go figure!
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« Reply #147 on: November 22, 2016, 01:01:14 am »

The challenge I have every year is finding cornichons, which are de rigueur for holiday meals IMHO. This year, I only had to go to four places to find them! And most of these stores are the size of a football field! Go figure!

Amazon.
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« Reply #148 on: November 22, 2016, 11:40:55 am »

I'm getting  away easy this year.  Michelle wants me to just bake various rolls/breads and a Buffalo  Chicken Dip
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