Author Topic: Holiday Menus  (Read 83371 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #180 on: November 10, 2020, 09:05:12 pm »
That sounds great, Chuck! I wish I had some fun ancestral food to mix into Thanksgiving!

My folks (and their folks and who knows how many folks before that) was from Iowa.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #181 on: November 10, 2020, 10:09:11 pm »
That sounds great, Chuck! I wish I had some fun ancestral food to mix into Thanksgiving!

My folks (and their folks and who knows how many folks before that) was from Iowa.

Does that mean green bean casserole is a traditional dish?
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #182 on: November 11, 2020, 10:16:41 am »
Does that mean green bean casserole is a traditional dish?

I think so, though not an essential element. Around here, the traditional kind involves beans mixed with cream of mushroom soup and topped with canned fried onions.

That actually sounds pretty good. I'm making Thanksgiving dinner this year, with the help of one or more of my sons -- or perhaps I'll help them; they like to cook. If I were to make green-bean casserole I'd try to use fresher ingredients than Campbell's and French's packaged products.

The vegetable part of a Thanksgiving dinner can be the hardest because nobody cares about that.  :laugh:





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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #183 on: November 11, 2020, 01:28:03 pm »
Oh yes, traditional Minnesota hot dish.

Around here, Thanksgiving is when the vegetables shine. Turkey is really kind of bland, as is mashed potatoes. So, the side dishes are crucial to the success of the meal.

My mother's signature dish was spiced peaches. I'm not sure what my signature dish for Thanksgiving might be. Probably Brussels sprouts. My children always ask for them.

Dessert is important too, but most of the time we are too full to eat it, so we make a date a day or two later to eat dessert. I put chopped walnuts in my pumpkin pie. They sink to the bottom and give a surprise crunch and burst of flavor at the end of each bite.

I must order my turkey soon. There is a shortage of small turkeys as the gatherings are smaller this year. Our Governor told us to avoid gatherings, whatever the size, for a few weeks due to the spike in cases.
When you see the smiley face in the sky, the pandemic will be over!

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #184 on: November 11, 2020, 05:52:39 pm »
The vegetable part of a Thanksgiving dinner can be the hardest because nobody cares about that.  :laugh:


:laugh:


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #185 on: November 11, 2020, 05:56:17 pm »
Oh yes, traditional Minnesota hot dish.

Around here, Thanksgiving is when the vegetables shine. Turkey is really kind of bland, as is mashed potatoes. So, the side dishes are crucial to the success of the meal.

My mother's signature dish was spiced peaches. I'm not sure what my signature dish for Thanksgiving might be. Probably Brussels sprouts. My children always ask for them.

Dessert is important too, but most of the time we are too full to eat it, so we make a date a day or two later to eat dessert. I put chopped walnuts in my pumpkin pie. They sink to the bottom and give a surprise crunch and burst of flavor at the end of each bite.

I must order my turkey soon. There is a shortage of small turkeys as the gatherings are smaller this year. Our Governor told us to avoid gatherings, whatever the size, for a few weeks due to the spike in cases.


Don't hold off too long on getting your supplies.   I was at the market today, and there were a lot of people who were doing Thanksgiving shopping, and two of the people told me the store was starting to run low on stuff.

Of course, there's time to restock before the holiday, it's still 15 days until the holiday, but still, better to get it done early and have it, than wait too late and not be able to find it anywhere.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #186 on: November 12, 2020, 10:44:34 am »
Oh yes, traditional Minnesota hot dish.

Well, actually a hot dish can be almost anything because it's just what Minnesotans call casserole. My folks was Iowan, so I didn't start using "hot dish" until adulthood, and then semi-ironically. The most classic Minnesota hot dish is tater-tot hot dish, which is tater tots baked over meat and vegetables. Kind of like a convenience-product shepherd's pie, I guess. Recently I considered trying to make one using broccoli tots and more interesting ingredients, but I haven't dared yet.

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Around here, Thanksgiving is when the vegetables shine. Turkey is really kind of bland, as is mashed potatoes. So, the side dishes are crucial to the success of the meal.

I like turkey and dressing (and gravy!) because Thanksgiving is pretty much the only time of the year I eat them. I like mashed potatoes any time. My ex-mother-in-law also makes mashed rutabagas, so I'll make those this year. (Sometimes when I make mashed cauliflower I throw in a couple of potatoes or turnips or a rutabaga, which gives the concoction more body than cauliflower alone.)

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Probably Brussels sprouts. My children always ask for them.

I'll probably make Brussels sprouts, too. I love them! I haven't cooked a whole Thanksgiving dinner since I lived in New Orleans, but that's when I first made them and realized that, contrary to prevailing belief at the time, they're really good. I think that was before they became fixtures in nice restaurants, so it's entirely possible Emeril Lagasse was walking past my house one evening, smelled the delicious Brussels sprouts, and launched the trend. (Or possibly it was the other way around -- maybe I got the idea from eating them at Emeril's or some other fancy NOLA restaurant. I can't remember now!)

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Dessert is important too, but most of the time we are too full to eat it, so we make a date a day or two later to eat dessert. I put chopped walnuts in my pumpkin pie. They sink to the bottom and give a surprise crunch and burst of flavor at the end of each bite.

Years ago I started making sweet-potato pie. A friend had me over for Thanksgiving and served pumpkin pie made from fresh pumpkin, and I was impressed but that seemed like a lot of work so I started making sweet-potato pie every year. I make a recipe with bourbon in it (I usually pick Wild Turkey for obvious reasons). Everybody seems to like it.

I've probably told this story before, but one year I was invited to a friend's father who is kind of a gourmand. (For example, he says Brussels sprouts are best after the first freeze.) So I was really meticulous about the sweet-potato pie -- watched the oven to take it out at precisely the right time, made the whipped cream just the right consistency and flavor. I served it after dinner, and as soon as I took a bite I realized I'd forgotten to add sugar. Everybody sat there eating it for a few minutes, and finally I said, "I think I forgot to sugar." "Yeah, I think so," everybody said in unison.

I took the rest of it home and found that microwaved pieces, topped with cheese, were like pumpkin quiche. Yum!

(Side note: I've recently discovered my store sells pumpkin-pie hummus! It's pretty good -- like denser and presumably healthier pumpkin pie. I top it with a dollop of ricotta and/or mascarpone.)

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I must order my turkey soon. There is a shortage of small turkeys as the gatherings are smaller this year. Our Governor told us to avoid gatherings, whatever the size, for a few weeks due to the spike in cases.

Oh no! I hadn't even thought about that. Every gathering that splits up means that many more turkeys. So for example instead of one at our extended family gathering, which won't be happening this year, there'll be at least three or four turkeys. But of course turkey farmers only raise the number they expect to sell ... :o



Offline southendmd

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #187 on: November 12, 2020, 12:08:28 pm »
As I'll only have three to dinner for Tgiving, I've decided to cook turkey thighs. 

I once did a turkey breast roulade, but it was too much work and not that great.  We're a dark meat crowd anyway. 

Offline brian

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #188 on: November 12, 2020, 01:56:48 pm »
We call sweet potato kumera and I do not like it.  I prefer chicken to turkey. We did not have turkey when I was a child, chicken was a luxury item then. Although I now have chicken every week, I am quite happy to have it on Christmas day along with ham and salmon (for a starter).
When I first moved to NZ, my sister asked me to go back for Christmas. I did for six years but then changed to Easter as Christmas is too hot for me in Sydney. So this will be my 4th year of having Christmas by myself.  Probably fortunate as I would not be allowed to go to Australia for Christmas this year but I am now use to having it by myself.  Last year my sister came over here in the first week of December and we went to an expensive winery for lunch one day. When she went home a few days later, we did not know we would not see each other again for over a year (probably nearly 18 months) and that I would not be able go over at Easter.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #189 on: November 12, 2020, 08:54:32 pm »
We did not have turkey when I was a child

That's because you don't have a charming origin story about Europeans and indigenous people gathering for a nice dinner of turkey and mashed potatoes, having a splendid time and living happily ever after. ... Or at least until about a year later, when a spike outside the European fort held the head of the leader of the indigenous group that showed up that day.

At least according to a story I read last year in the New Yorker. Fairly reliable source.