Author Topic: Movie News  (Read 36276 times)

Offline oilgun

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #100 on: April 01, 2007, 05:44:49 pm »
Has anyone seen Shortbus?  It's John Cameron Mitchell's follow-up to Hedwig and the Angry Inch and includes real & explicit sex scenes.  I thought it was a very well made film with very believable characters that were treated with respect and affection. It explored its themes with intelligence, humour and a refreshing honesty and it actually treats sex like it was a valid human activity.  I highly recommend it.

The main actor, Sook Yin Lee, is a well known radio personality here in Canada and she almost lost her job at the CBC when the vp of Radio got wind of her involvement in the film.  Luckily, many high profile personalities sent in letters supporting her and the project so they reversed their decision.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #101 on: April 01, 2007, 05:52:56 pm »
Impish saw it and recommended it. Shortly thereafter he disappeared from the board, never to be heard from again. I hope there isn't a curse attached to seeing it! I assume you saw the movie on DVD??
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Offline oilgun

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #102 on: April 01, 2007, 06:07:33 pm »
I assume you saw the movie on DVD??

Yes I did, but I remember when it was at the theatre.  The DVD was very reasonably priced for a new release (CAN$16.99) so I bought it blind and I wasn't disappointed. I found it to be a very validating, feel-good experience. The extra features are decent, (unlike BbM's, he he) and make you appreciate the film even more.  

Offline j.U.d.E.

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #103 on: April 02, 2007, 08:48:49 am »
Anyone heard of (or seen) "The Bubble"? I thought it had been mentioned here, but I cannot find it.

It's by Eytan Fox - Yossi & Jagger! It's kind of a sequel, I think..

Should be interesting!

http://www.thebubble.msn.co.il/eng/index.asp

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Offline Wishes

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #104 on: April 02, 2007, 09:30:59 pm »
OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thank you, thank you, thank you for that link!!!!!!

I had Googled The Bubble but that never came up. There is much less info on this movie than Eytan Fox's other two more popular movies. (which I both own on DVD) I know nothing of a DVD release date yet. I am very anxious to see this movie.

Here is a link to a youtube video if you have not seen it. "The Man I Love" sung by Ivri Lider. I just love him. Of coarse. He's Israeli! :)


Offline Wishes

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #105 on: April 02, 2007, 10:00:54 pm »
If anyone is interested in listening to more of Ivri Lider here is a link to his English web site. There are several songs that loop. Some sung in English, some in Hebrew. I have been listening to this a lot when I sit in my computer room and knit. I've never liked the song "Nights In White Satin" but I love his version. Love the accent.

http://www.ivrilider.com/english/

Offline j.U.d.E.

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #106 on: April 05, 2007, 04:23:46 pm »
Thank you Wishes! Ivri Lider is the one who composed some of the songs in "Yossi & Jagger" right? I forget.

It's a beautiful song! I love Hebrew songs too. I love the language! I tried to learn it once.. :-\

Wishes, I got the link from imdb.com. On the left, when you scroll down, it says 'official site'.

It doesn't say anything about release dates in my country. Can't wait either, to see this one! I have "Yossi & Jagger" on DVD too, but I haven't even seen "Walk on Water" yet!!  :o  Will have to get the DVD some day soon!  ;D

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Offline Wishes

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #107 on: April 10, 2007, 05:04:05 pm »
j.u.d.e., I don't know how I missed that link as I have been to the imdb site. So thanks again.

Yes, Ivri Lider is the one who sang the song "Bo" (Come) at the end of Yossi & Jagger. And I do believe he composed the theme music also. It's amazing what they did with that movie considering how low budget it was. Do try to see Walk on Water if you can. I think you will like it also.

I'm going to keep looking for The Bubble on DVD. I do hope it comes out soon. I enjoy watching the clips on the official site though even without subtitles! Several times over.  :)

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #108 on: June 19, 2007, 07:07:19 pm »
I had the pleasure on the evening of this past Sunday, June 17th, to watch the American television premiere of Jacques Feyder's rare and almost legendary 1925 silent feature Visages d'enfants, presented on Turner Classic Movies as their weekly silent-film offering. Film historian Jean Mitry is famously quoted as having stated that if he could save but one French film from the 1920's, it would be Visages d'enfants, an outstanding example of the rural-themed film that has been such a distinguished, if sometimes intermittent component of France's cinematic heritage. After seeing this highly sought-out film for myself (albeit through the equivocal lens of television transmission), I can understand Mitry's regard and enthusiasm.

The film, which was directed by Jacques Feyder from a script that he co-wrote with his wife Francoise Rosay, is set in an Alpine village, and tells the story of a little boy struggling from the grief caused by the recent death of his beloved mother. The child's quandary is further burdened by his widower father's subsquent remarriage to a local widow with a young daughter by her late husband. The boy's stepmother is sympathetic in herself, but unwittingly becomes the focus of her stepson's opprobrium simply for taking the place and role of the mother he cannot forget. His new stepsister, who entered this new menage just as reluctantly, also comes to bear the brunt of his dislike and distrust. Through a series of unexpected and dramatic incidents, the emotions of all the household's members are tested to the utmost, and all are challenged with powerful lessons of love, understanding, and forgiveness. A new family is forged through a crucible of anguish and hope.

The most immediately striking quality of the film is its stunning cinematography, shot on location in the beautiful Alpine region. The locations, gorgeous in themselves, are given further character by some striking camera angles and movements. Host Robert Osborne stated that the film was shot/set in Switzerland, yet other sources I have encountered claim France as the site and setting.

A similar ambiguity inflected the period in which the story occurs. I had assumed that the setting was contemporary (1920's), but nowhere does one see any of the accoutrements of a young twentieth century, such as trains, automobiles, and telephones. The characters likewise wear folk costumes that must have changed little in the preceding centuries, and are overwhelmingly agricultural, pastoralist folk, living very close to the land in much the same way as their ancestors had surely done. Contemporary audiences might have been more attuned to nuances of temporal setting that would elude a viewer like me, coming to the material almost a century later, but I was astonished to think that anyone in France in 1925 would have lived in such a rustic fashion as these characters.

The film is also notable for the fine, assured performances of the entire cast, and the three children who are central to the story are especially remarkable in this regard. Jean Forest as the grieving boy, Pierrette Houyez as his guileless little sister, and Arlette Peyran as the grudging new stepsister all impress with their engaging and realistic portrayals. Forest, who appeared in Feyder's earlier Crainquebille, shows an artistic sensitivity beyond his years in his conveyance of the different faces grief can take, ranging from the sorrowful and sullen to the enraged and defeated.

Like that earlier film Crainquebille, Visages d'enfants is also graced by momentary touches of fantasy, used to convey the inner states of the characters. The films' Cartesian poetry generates a visual and rhythmic quality that links them to the Impressionist phase of French cinema, in its day an aesthetic movement almost as influential as the now better-known Expressionism of German film. For this quality alone, both these wonderful films deserve to be seen, studied, and cherished for generations to come. 

moremojo

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Re: Movie News
« Reply #109 on: July 02, 2007, 11:02:06 am »
I made another of my increasingly rare forays to the cinema this weekend (on Saturday, June 30th, to be precise), accompanied by my parents (both visiting from out of town) and my sister, to see the animated feature Ratatouille, a whimsically charming fantasy of a gastronomically gifted rat's dream of becoming a great French chef. The animation, courtesy of Pixar studios, is superb and state-of-the-art, and the pleasure afforded by the film's visual excellence is bolstered by a well-crafted screenplay featuring engaging and well-rounded characters that the viewer genuinely comes to care about.

This is gonna sound a bit crazy, probably, and I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it, but I actually thought one of the principal characters was quite cute (in the I-wish-he-could-be-my-boyfriend kind of way)--I'm specifically referring to Linguini, voiced by Lou Romano, a lanky, gangly, but thoroughly winning young fellow who becomes the main character Remy's unexpected vehicle to culinary success. Linguini was distinguished by the artists who created him by a big nose and pronounced ears (both weaknesses of mine), perhaps to suggest further connection to the rodent he is helping (Linguini is a human character), and the fine, naively charming character with which he was invested just sealed my affection for him. Ennis and Jack, make some room for (egad) a cartoon character!

I and my family all enjoyed the film very much, and were equally delighted by the wonderful short (also from Pixar) that preceded the feature, called Lifted--a sweetly funny take on, of all things, the present-day mythology surrounding supposed alien abductions. Both short and feature come warmly recommended by me.