Author Topic: What are you watching these days?  (Read 1751 times)

Offline Front-Ranger

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What are you watching these days?
« on: November 05, 2020, 11:18:32 am »
I really miss going to the movies. Watching Netflix and Amazon at home is just not the same.

I'm really not the right person to start this topic. I just started watching in the evenings with the time change and to have a distraction from the election debacle. So far, I've watched Enola Holmes, Virgin River, and the first episode of Queen's Gambit. It's too early to say about the latter, but it is highly acclaimed. Virgin River is like a Hallmark show, but strangely engrossing because of the good looks and magnetism of the lead (hetero) couple. I thoroughly enjoyed Enola Holmes, with its strong casting and lively plot. But Henry Cavill as Sherlock Holmes? He's far too robust looking (can't imagine him taking cocaine or smoking four pipefuls of tobacco) and he emotes too much.

What are you watching and what do you recommend?
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Offline brianr

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2020, 01:55:46 pm »
I do not have any of those services. I tried a free trial with Amazon but only watched one movie. So I can only watch free to air movies at home and rarely do. I love going to the cinema. Unfortunately there does not seem to be a lot of movies being produced. Last Sunday I saw "I am Woman" about Helen Reddy which was excellent. I am getting my hair cut today and would have liked to see a movie afterwards but nothing interested me. I think I will go to the Art Gallery instead.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2020, 05:07:45 pm »
I really miss going to the movies. Watching Netflix and Amazon at home is just not the same.

I'm really not the right person to start this topic. I just started watching in the evenings with the time change and to have a distraction from the election debacle. So far, I've watched Enola Holmes, Virgin River, and the first episode of Queen's Gambit. It's too early to say about the latter, but it is highly acclaimed. Virgin River is like a Hallmark show, but strangely engrossing because of the good looks and magnetism of the lead (hetero) couple. I thoroughly enjoyed Enola Holmes, with its strong casting and lively plot. But Henry Cavill as Sherlock Holmes? He's far too robust looking (can't imagine him taking cocaine or smoking four pipefuls of tobacco) and he emotes too much.

What are you watching and what do you recommend?

I would watch Henry Cavill read Webster's on the internet.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline southendmd

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2020, 05:48:48 pm »
I would watch Henry Cavill read Webster's on the internet.

I second that.


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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2020, 08:28:41 pm »
In that case, I highly recommend Enola Holmes!
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2020, 12:20:58 am »
I second that.



I'm glad you agree.

I wouldn't go anywhere near that soap opera The Tudors, but if I had known he was in it, I might have reconsidered.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2020, 12:52:46 am »
No doubt a publicity still from The Tudors, but Henry Cavill is wearing my boots.

Well, kinda sorta maybe.

Back in my SCAdian days, I had a pair of boots that looked exactly like what he's wearing. I got my boots from a place called Museum Replicas, which has, indeed, supplied weapons and other gear to movies and TV shows, so it's possible he's wearing the same style I once had. The sword looks like something from Museum Replicas, too. For that matter, so does the shirt. MR once sold a shirt with a narrow stand-up collar decorated with English blackwork.

The first thing I saw Henry Cavill in was an episode of The Inspector Lynley Mysteries (2002), which ran on PBS. HC played the Head Boy in a British "public school." He was 19 years old, and as soon as I saw him I thought, "He's going to be a star."
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2020, 12:28:59 pm »
...the first episode of Queen's Gambit.

I heard somewhere that Heath had taken an option on the book and wanted to produce this. I can see why he'd be interested.

It does get tedious sometimes, watching people sitting in chairs, concentrating, occasionally moving small chess pieces small distances. No more tedious than watching people tending sheep on a mountain, though.
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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2020, 12:30:09 pm »
No doubt a publicity still from The Tudors, but Henry Cavill is wearing my boots.


Is he also wearing leather pants? Yum!
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2020, 07:35:35 pm »
Is he also wearing leather pants? Yum!

I believe they are leather pants.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2020, 05:13:38 pm »
I started watching Enola Holmes again. It's as entertaining as ever the second time around.
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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2020, 05:17:36 pm »
I keep hearing about movie releases, that Kevin Costner/Diane Lane film, "Ammonite", and "The Nest". Where are these films playing? Are they streaming? No movie theaters are open in my neck of the woods.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2020, 10:28:22 pm »
It does get tedious sometimes, watching people sitting in chairs, concentrating, occasionally moving small chess pieces small distances. No more tedious than watching people tending sheep on a mountain, though.


Well, as long as they're breaking the tedium by getting it on in tents from time to time.



Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2020, 10:30:58 pm »
I watched My Octopus Teacher last night. I'm not particularly big on nature documentaries in general, but this was one of the best I've seen. The relationship between the guy and his octopus friend reminded me of Tesla and his pigeon. It's strange, educational and sad. There was even a little bit of Charlotte's Web in it.



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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2020, 01:27:58 pm »
I liked the part where the guy found a male octopus sitting beside his friend one day and was happy but knew that her life cycle was coming to an end.  :'(
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2020, 03:51:35 pm »
I've been "off" on octopuses since I was a kid. Back in them days there was a cooking show on PBS called The Galloping Gourmet. My grandmother and my mother both watched the show, so I was exposed to it--until the day the host cooked octopus, and a tentacle came slithering out of the stewpot of boiling water. That ended it for all of us.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2020, 10:27:56 am by Jeff Wrangler »
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2020, 11:42:54 pm »
I've been "off" on octopuses since I was a kind. Back in them days there was a cooking show on PBS called The Galloping Gourmet. My grandmother and my mother both watched the show, so I was exposed to it--until the day the host cooked octopus, and a tentacle came slithering out of the stewpot of boiling water. That ended it for all of us.

Eek. I can see why that would be disturbing. How are you with calamari (squid)? I used to go to a restaurant that had this excellent baby octopus salad. How would I feel about that now that I've seen My Octopus Teacher?

I liked the part where the guy found a male octopus sitting beside his friend one day and was happy but knew that her life cycle was coming to an end.  :'(

Yeah, nature is cruel. I hate the fact that, in many species, females are pretty much done living once they've reproduced. At least among humans we pretend that's not the case!  :laugh:

Speaking of thinking of animals' suffering, I highly recommend this essay. Gourmet magazine sent David Foster Wallace to cover a Maine lobster festival and the article he wrote was ... unorthodox. I was just talking about it the other day with my son, who considers DFW a buzzkill because he goes to these things that people think are fun (also a cruise and a state fair) and writes critical essays about them. But I think they're great. They are critical, but they're not snooty or mean-spirited, IMO.

http://www.columbia.edu/~col8/lobsterarticle.pdf



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2020, 10:41:15 am »
Eek. I can see why that would be disturbing. How are you with calamari (squid)?

I won't touch it. I won't eat anything that has it in it or on it. I won't even try it because it's ... squid. I'm not a seafood/fish person. Tuna and salmon are OK, and clams in chowder. I've had crabmeat salad and lobster rolls, and they were OK, but lobster cooked as just plain lobster seems too rich for my stomach (sometimes I wonder if the problem was actually too much butter rather than the lobster itself when I tried it).

Except for maybe salmon loaf and salmon croquets, the only way my mother knew how to prepare fish was to fry it, and the odor of frying fish turned my stomach. It still does. I don't even like to be too close if I'm with someone who orders fish in a restaurant.

"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2020, 04:09:38 pm »
I won't touch it. I won't eat anything that has it in it or on it. I won't even try it because it's ... squid. I'm not a seafood/fish person. Tuna and salmon are OK, and clams in chowder. I've had crabmeat salad and lobster rolls, and they were OK, but lobster cooked as just plain lobster seems too rich for my stomach (sometimes I wonder if the problem was actually too much butter rather than the lobster itself when I tried it).

Except for maybe salmon loaf and salmon croquets, the only way my mother knew how to prepare fish was to fry it, and the odor of frying fish turned my stomach. It still does. I don't even like to be too close if I'm with someone who orders fish in a restaurant.

I like all of those things in most forms. For a while there I didn't like scallops, but I've grown to like those, too.

When I lived in New Orleans, one of my favorite things was raw oysters. You can get those here and they're probably just as good, but they're much more expensive than they are there.

Once I went to a party and brought an appetizer of smoked fish spread (with cream cheese and maybe mayo) and crackers. I'd made a special stop at a smoked-fish shop on the shore of Lake Superior, then made the spread. The party was on a backyard deck The hostess took a bite of it, then ran to lean over the deck railing and spit it out on the grass. Seemed like kind of a rude way to express her dislike for smoked fish, which you'd think she would have already known about (she was 50ish at the time).





Offline brianr

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2020, 12:18:24 am »
I am very fond of calamari, not so much octopus.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2020, 09:51:25 am »
Someone who lives near me posted this on Nextdoor. Sounds like it could be pretty good:


Quote
Need a cheer up?  Try the BBC "Farm" series.

Hi neighbors!

If you need a charming, free, historically accurate series on YouTube with some Christmas themed episodes, may I share the gift of the BBC "Farm" series? A historian and two archaeologists "live" for a year in the style and custom of a past era.  It has seriously cheered me up to see three friends in period clothing living and working together on a farm using traditional methods, as well as partaking in all the old school customs, food, drinks, and celebrations.   

Pick your era - Wartime (WWII), Edwardian, Victorian, or Tudor.  These will make you very grateful for all our modern conveniences,  in awe at how those from our human family tree did things in the face of adversity, and maybe even inspire your holidays this year.   

Example:
Victorian Christmas


Wartime Christmas


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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2020, 10:34:00 am »
Thanks, I will check that out!

Regarding fish and seafood, since I'm from the Midwest, you would think I don't like fish, maybe excepting the fried catfish my mother used to make on Fridays. But I am also a contrarian, so I love most fish and seafood. Oddly, Denver gets frequent air deliveries of fresh fish for sushi. That's one of the things I miss so much--not being able to go to sushi restaurants. Raw oysters are very nice but I did have a problem once when attending a sales conference in Boston. I had oysters and German Chocolate Cake at the Quincy Market, and then I got on a bus to go to my hotel up north. Well, the cake and the oysters fought with each other all the way.

These days I just buy cod to make fish tacos and I haven't made those in a long while. Thank you for reminding me that I need to make fish tacos again!
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2020, 11:12:14 am »
Regarding fish and seafood, since I'm from the Midwest, you would think I don't like fish, maybe excepting the fried catfish my mother used to make on Fridays. But I am also a contrarian, so I love most fish and seafood.

Quick defense of the Midwest: I currently live there and have also lived in several other parts of the country, and I don't see a huge difference in appetite for fish aside from the fact that oysters are much cheaper in New Orleans, lobster is much cheaper in Maine, crab is much cheaper in Maryland, and similar economics apply to all ocean-dwelling creatures. Until the pandemic, my son was working as a waiter at a fancy seafood restaurant and made good tips, so apparently there are plenty of contrarians here (who are/were also supporting numerous other fish and seafood restaurants besides that one).

Quote
Oddly, Denver gets frequent air deliveries of fresh fish for sushi.

They must do the same here, because sushi is plentiful. Or maybe it arrives frozen? Come to think of it, I don't really know. Most grocery stores have a sushi chef on site, which is where I often get it because it's more convenient than ordering from a restaurant, though some would probably consider that just a step up from truck stop sushi.  :laugh: But maybe that's what distinguishes a good sushi restaurant from a store. (Good sushi restaurants are located even in smallish suburban towns.) Back when I worked downtown, I frequently got sushi from the two nearby takeout sushi places, and once from a food truck. All were pretty good.

Quote
I had oysters and German Chocolate Cake at the Quincy Market, and then I got on a bus to go to my hotel up north. Well, the cake and the oysters fought with each other all the way.

Once in New Orleans my husband and I went to kind of a dive but beloved restaurant (another example of how almost every restaurant in NOLA is good). He ordered half a dozen cooked oysters and half of them had gone bad. The restaurant took half off his bill.  :laugh:  Very generous for potentially exposing a customer to food poisoning.

Quote
These days I just buy cod to make fish tacos and I haven't made those in a long while. Thank you for reminding me that I need to make fish tacos again!

I'm remembering how initially our friendship formed around a mutual love of fish tacos!  :D

 

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2020, 12:52:46 pm »
The Midwest is better these days regarding seafood, but back when I was growing up, you'd be lucky to find even frozen fish, except for Gorton's fish sticks. Canned tuna was also available and that was about it. If you wanted to eat seafood, you had to go to a restaurant. My family's favorite was the Hickory House. There was always a line to get in, even though you had to make a reservation. So, the line formed inside the front door, and there was a lobster tank. I would watch the lobsters clambering all over each other. There were colorful golf tees wedged in their wrists so they could not pinch each other or the handlers with their claws.
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Offline brianr

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2020, 01:56:34 pm »
My sister always tells the story that soon after they were married (they will have their 60th anniversary next year so a long time ago), she wanted to impress her husband by cooking a lobster. She went to the Fish Markets and it was alive and she had a 40 minute drive home with it on the seat beside her thrashing about in the bag. Then she put it in the freezer and could hear it knocking.
Her husband never got fresh lobster again.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2020, 03:24:02 pm »
The Midwest is better these days regarding seafood, but back when I was growing up, you'd be lucky to find even frozen fish, except for Gorton's fish sticks. ot pinch each other or the handlers with their claws.

How could I forget fish sticks, and fish filets!  :o  The Mrs. Paul's brand was big where I grew up, or maybe that's just the brand my mother bought. I didn't hear of Gorton's until I was grown up.

But fish sticks are good! I actually get hungry for them every now and then. Put catsup on them and eat them with mac and cheese.  :D

An old friend once told me that was what his Catholic mother served every Friday, fish sticks and mac and cheese.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline southendmd

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #26 on: December 11, 2020, 06:39:55 pm »


An old friend once told me that was what his Catholic mother served every Friday, fish sticks and mac and cheese.


Same here!  Except we had Mrs. Paul's with frozen french fries. 

We alternated this with Stouffer's mac and cheese during Lent. 

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #27 on: December 11, 2020, 09:05:53 pm »
I can remember being served fish sticks for a little while on Fridays, and then one night mom served the fish sticks, and I bit into one, and it was green inside.

:o

Everyone freaked out and they were collected and thrown out, and that was the last time we had fish sticks.  :laugh:


The only time we had fish after that was when we went out to a local Arthur Treature's Fish & Chips restaurant.





Of course, after I grew up, I went back to eating seafood, usually when I go out.  I do have some frozen shrimp, sticks and scallops in my freezer as we speak.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #28 on: December 11, 2020, 09:12:52 pm »
While this may make some people shudder, I've been watching Hallmark Christmas movies since the day after Thanksgiving.

I don't get to see very many of them, and since I'm working from home, I am able to watch a lot more, and I've seen 44 so far.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #29 on: December 11, 2020, 09:38:35 pm »
The Midwest is better these days regarding seafood, but back when I was growing up, you'd be lucky to find even frozen fish, except for Gorton's fish sticks. Canned tuna was also available and that was about it. If you wanted to eat seafood, you had to go to a restaurant.

I sometimes think your experience of the Midwest was somewhat different from mine. But I bet fish sticks were the main form of seafood in them days anywhere in the country that wasn't near an ocean. Quick shipping might not have been available, and I don't think Americans in general were very sophisticated eaters in general. Thank goodness for Julia Child and Alice Waters!

Every spring my parents would get a big bag of smelt -- little fish that rushed through northern rivers in the spring, cooked breaded and fried. I never hear of them now, so maybe they were overfished. We ate fish, like walleye, caught by people who fished, like my aunt and her partner. My mom sometimes made scallops but I didn't like them (not until recently, in fact). When I was about 18, my friends and I started going to what I then regarded as fancy (chain) seafood restaurants, and those all-you-can-eat crab leg places became a trend.

But food everywhere is more sophisticated these days. The only place I've been that stands out as being much more sophisticated than other cities is New Orleans. In regard to food, that is, not necessarily anything else.

I also think Catholics may have a different experience of fish. My friend who spit out the smoked fish spread grew up Catholic and I think hated fish for that reason. My folks was atheists (or agnostics, or Unitarians or whatever), so we didn't even do Lent, let alone fish on Fridays.

Oh, I just remembered one thing, though. When I lived in Duluth, MN, in the '80s, an upscale Italian restaurant opened with interesting food like carpaccio. But they had a billboard that -- I can't remember the exact wording but it was meant to reassure potential customers that not all their food was weird and foreign. So they had a picture of a steak. But the weird and foreign Italian food was ... spaghetti and meatballs.  :laugh:

Sorry, Chuck. I think even Duluth residents of the '80s were pretty familiar with spaghetti, if only thanks to Chef Boyardee!  :laugh:






 

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #30 on: December 11, 2020, 10:15:29 pm »
The only time we had fish after that was when we went out to a local Arthur Treature's Fish & Chips restaurant.






OMG!  :o  That's a name I haven't heard in years on years. Are those places still around?

Does anybody (besides me) know who Arthur Treacher was? (Without googling, I mean.)
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2020, 10:19:58 pm »
I don't think Americans in general were very sophisticated eaters in general. Thank goodness for Julia Child and Alice Waters!

I wonder what sort of influence they've actually had, and with whom. I mean, if you were watching Julia Child, you were watching PBS, so weren't you already sort of sophisticated? Or did they teach people who were already sophisticated how to eat sophisticated?

 ???
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #32 on: December 11, 2020, 11:19:57 pm »
I wonder what sort of influence they've actually had, and with whom. I mean, if you were watching Julia Child, you were watching PBS, so weren't you already sort of sophisticated? Or did they teach people who were already sophisticated how to eat sophisticated?

 ???

I think it was spillover. I rarely watch PBS, would never attempt a Julia Child recipe, have never read anything Alice Waters wrote or said (aside from a quote here or there). But I think they affected the culture overall and it changed what chefs made and what foodies valued and what became fashionable and inspired other celebrity chefs and food writers and gradually trickled down to regular people like me.

I became a "food writer" in the mid-'80s, which is to say I was a lifestyle writer and part of my job was to write a weekly food piece. I didn't know much about cooking, so I wrote more cultural food things, like what people made at their vacation cabins. I wrote something about cabbage, I remember. I got free cookbooks like the Silver Palate Cookbook, which provided the vinaigrette recipe I use to this day.

I can't remember any other food stories I wrote in that job, except that once I wrote something with the word "puke" in the first paragraph (I don't remember the overall topic) and a reader called to complain that it had made him sick.



« Last Edit: December 13, 2020, 10:50:42 am by serious crayons »

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #33 on: December 12, 2020, 05:39:35 pm »
I wonder what sort of influence they've actually had, and with whom. I mean, if you were watching Julia Child, you were watching PBS, so weren't you already sort of sophisticated? Or did they teach people who were already sophisticated how to eat sophisticated?


Very clever of you to weave all these musings together into a post that brings us back to what we are (or were) watching! No, I missed the chance to watch PBS when I was young. I was already off in college when it was established in 1969, away from home and with no television. I'm trying to think when it was that I had a television again. Probably not until 1983 when I was married. Even then, I hardly ever watched until my children came along in 1988. Then PBS's Barney the dinosaur became part of my daily life! I did watch "The Galloping Gourmet" a couple of times, a couple of Martha Stewart specials, but the first time I saw "Julia Child" on TV, it was Dan Akroyd on SNL!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSxv6IGBgFQ
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Offline CellarDweller

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2020, 05:47:50 pm »
OMG!  :o  That's a name I haven't heard in years on years. Are those places still around?

Does anybody (besides me) know who Arthur Treacher was? (Without googling, I mean.)


I don't think there are stand-alone restaurants anymore, but as I understand  it, they've kinda been taken over by Nathan's Famous.  Anywhere that sells Nathan's Famous hot dogs and such, you should see a menu of Arthur Treacher's seafood.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #35 on: December 13, 2020, 11:50:45 am »
We watched PBS now and then when I was a kid. I remember my parents watched the breakthrough documentary (or first reality show!) An American Family in its entirety. I was only vaguely aware of it, but around that time I was watching some things I would still think are good, like The Smothers Brothers, and some that wouldn't seem especially good by modern standards but at least culturally significant, like Laugh In and The Mod Squad, but also, as we've discussed, a lot of Gillian's Island, Petticoat Junction and the like.

Over the years I've known a lot of people who don't own TVs, or never watch TV. I did a story about them once years ago. I always felt like, sure, a lot of TV is schlocky, but it's also Ken Burns and ... well, Ken Burns anyway.

Now, though, I feel sorry for people who never watch TV because so much of it is really good -- better than most movies, IMO. Except now most movies are on TV, too! I love movie theaters and hope they don't die out, but I'd already been watching more movies on TV because a) Netflix, Amazon, etc., have been making some really good ones and b) it's so much cheaper to watch at home, even if you miss the big screen, dark theater, trailers and popcorn. Still, I hope COVID isn't the final nail in the coffin.

Now I rarely watch more than an hour of TV a night, and sometimes not even that. But it's pretty carefully curated because there are a lot of things genuinely worth watching -- more than I have time for, even. Especially since there's also the teetering stack of New Yorkers and books and the NYT and Washington Post and the paper I actually work for and the entire internet. 

Last night my son made smashburgers and I like to watch TV while eating dinner, but I had nothing specific I wanted to watch. I'm kind of between shows, having just finished a good one (Fargo) and didn't have anything else ready to dive into, so I turned to my old reliable -- The American Experience. I record all episodes, so they're always there whenever I need something quick that I know will be good. So last night it was one segment of a multi-part series about the women's suffrage movement. Very interesting! I'd never studied it that closely. It's kind of mind-blowing to think of it now, and realize it was only about 100 years ago. And some things have changed so much, and other things so little. It was about 90 minutes long and I got through about 50, so have more awaiting me whenever the time comes. Maybe tonight!

Speaking of which, OT (but we'll get right back to TV!  :)) but there's something I always wonder whenever I watch when of those documentaries. Jeff, maybe you know the answer. I hope I didn't already ask you this and forgot what you said. But why do the historian talking heads in documentaries always describe events in the present tense?



 

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #36 on: December 13, 2020, 01:46:49 pm »
Speaking of which, OT (but we'll get right back to TV!  :)) but there's something I always wonder whenever I watch when of those documentaries. Jeff, maybe you know the answer. I hope I didn't already ask you this and forgot what you said. But why do the historian talking heads in documentaries always describe events in the present tense?

Ya got me. Just like I wonder why people write fiction in the present tense.

I saw some--I'm sure not all--of the program on the Suffrage movement. I seem to remember something about the early advocates for women's suffrage had also been Abolitionists. And I remember the young member of the Tennessee legislature whose mother told him to "be a good boy" and vote to pass the suffrage amendment.  ;D
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: What are you watching these days?
« Reply #37 on: December 13, 2020, 03:31:05 pm »
Ya got me. Just like I wonder why people write fiction in the present tense.

I saw some--I'm sure not all--of the program on the Suffrage movement. I seem to remember something about the early advocates for women's suffrage had also been Abolitionists. And I remember the young member of the Tennessee legislature whose mother told him to "be a good boy" and vote to pass the suffrage amendment.  ;D

The reason for using it in fiction is to convey a sense of immediacy, of being in the moment. Some writers go back and forth with present and past when they're talking about two different eras or stories and want to distinguish them. But history is, by definition, in the past! And I wouldn't be surprised if one or two historians did it, but it seems to be de rigueur for all historians.

(Speaking of de rigueur, I saw someone on Twitter ask "Do you realize queue has four unnecessary letters?" :laugh:)