Author Topic: Celebrating the Winter Solstice  (Read 219801 times)

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #330 on: October 04, 2021, 11:39:26 am »
I must be a contrarian. I like the dark and Mondays.

But in my defense, one time I lived in the Detroit, Michigan, area for a few years and I caught a case of SAD disorder. Not enough daylight to keep me healthy. I remember looking out the window at the end of May and wondering when, if ever, it would be warm enough to plant my tomatoes. Luckily, we moved back to Colorado, which gets more sunny days than Florida, even!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #331 on: October 04, 2021, 02:36:11 pm »
I must be a contrarian. I like the dark and Mondays.

But in my defense, one time I lived in the Detroit, Michigan, area for a few years and I caught a case of SAD disorder. Not enough daylight to keep me healthy. I remember looking out the window at the end of May and wondering when, if ever, it would be warm enough to plant my tomatoes. Luckily, we moved back to Colorado, which gets more sunny days than Florida, even!

Well, exactly. I never realized I had SAD in college and some years thereafter until I looked back and realized it after I moved back to MN from NOLA. Then I was home all day with very small children. I would take them out in the car and, soaking up the sun's rays through the windshield and moon roof, I could feel my mood improving as if I'd just popped a pill.

Since then, I've been hyperaware of sunlight -- even things like what windows face in which directions. I see houses with beautiful big windows facing north and think, why? I prefer any of the other three directions.

Sunny days are nicer but I don't mind cloudy that much. It's more about daylight than actual sunshine, although both are good. Warmth is important, too, but I could never live in warm/cloudy Seattle.

One disappointing thing about my new apartment, which faces west. Since I moved in, I've been sitting on the balcony in the evening watching the sun set behind the trees. That's lovely, but I told myself how nice it would be to watch that in winter when the leaves are down and my apartment is flooded with light. Now I'm realizing the sun may be too far south to clear the building, so i won't see it set! A friend whose apartment is perpendicular to mine, so facing north, doesn't see the sun at all in winter.

As for Mondays, I've hated them as long as I can remember because they mean getting back to work or school with five long days stretching ahead. You're not a contrarian -- just harder working!  :laugh:



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #332 on: October 04, 2021, 03:25:43 pm »
Since then, I've been hyperaware of sunlight -- even things like what windows face in which directions. I see houses with beautiful big windows facing north and think, why? I prefer any of the other three directions.

Both my apartments and my condo all had/have south-facing windows. I crave the sunlight. Plus, the windows on the north side of the buildings face the center of the city and all its skyscrapers. That would be a nice view at might for, maybe, a week. ...

I would only consider living in a place with north-facing windows if the apartment overlooked a park.

Philadelphia has many tiny streets, so narrow a car could barely get through, with very quaint two-story Federal-style houses. Usually these streets are tree-lined, too. I think it would be neat to live in one of those houses (if I could afford it  ::)  ) until I realize they get no sunlight.

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One disappointing thing about my new apartment, which faces west. Since I moved in, I've been sitting on the balcony in the evening watching the sun set behind the trees. That's lovely, but I told myself how nice it would be to watch that in winter when the leaves are down and my apartment is flooded with light. Now I'm realizing the sun may be too far south to clear the building, so i won't see it set! A friend whose apartment is perpendicular to mine, so facing north, doesn't see the sun at all in winter.

When I first moved into my condo, I could go out on my living room balcony and have a 180-degree view. Plus there were no buildings higher than my building to the southward. That view has been gradually chipped away. Now, thanks to the new high-rise next door, I won't be able to see any October sunsets, which can be beautiful if the weather is clear.
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"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #333 on: October 04, 2021, 03:34:02 pm »

I would only consider living in a place with north-facing windows if the apartment overlooked a park.


Best of both worlds -- mine faces west, overlooking a big park, no buildings visible except for the 5-story wings of this one.