Author Topic: "Glee" anybody?  (Read 57679 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: "Glee" anybody?
« Reply #130 on: January 02, 2012, 11:41:41 pm »




I like him!

BTW, Meryl--hmmmm, I guess we know where
he's been doing at least some  of his rehearsal
time--at Juillard, no?? Unless he's moved from
Brooklyn to the Lincoln Center area to live....






http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/03/theater/darren-criss-of-glee-fills-daniel-radcliffes-shoes.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all



‘Glee’ Star
Gets His Broadway Turn

By PATRICK HEALY
Published: January 2, 2012



Darren Criss, a sensation on “Glee,” is about to make his Broadway debut.


In a rehearsal studio off Times Square last week, Darren Criss — a breakout star of the Fox high school musical series “Glee” — was performing a bit too perfectly.

Preparing for his Broadway debut on Tuesday night as the corporate climber J. Pierrepont Finch in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,” Mr. Criss was leaping into the air during the number “Grand Old Ivy” and tucking in his feet as a dancer would. This drew a correction from the director, Rob Ashford, who wanted Mr. Criss’s feet to be flat and extend sideways like those of an outstretched marionette, because his character should lack finesse.

“What you’re doing is almost too good,” Mr. Ashford told Mr. Criss, who stood panting slightly in dress slacks and a blue T-shirt from his alma mater, the University of Michigan. A moment later Mr. Criss nailed the leap with precise imprecision.

There are few higher compliments on Broadway than being called a triple threat: a performer who can act, sing and dance to extraordinary effect. (Think of Hugh Jackman.) Mr. Criss is the latest to strive for this status, and the producers of “How to Succeed” are betting on him to an unusual extent. They are spending tens of thousands of dollars to rehearse and pay Mr. Criss for just three weeks of performances this month, before he returns to “Glee,” in hopes of molding him into a theater star they might build a Broadway musical around someday. (Nick Jonas of the Jonas Brothers will play Finch, the role held by Daniel Radcliffe of “Harry Potter” fame, from Jan. 24 through July 1.)

For Mr. Criss, this detour from Hollywood has been a moment to savor rather than a ticket to an ego trip. At 24, he exudes a perceptive maturity — “I was nobody a year ago,” he said, “so I want to make smart choices to keep the good things going” — with enviable self-confidence. You might almost consider him cocky if not for his strong tendency to poke fun at himself as he mentions his detailed knowledge of “Star Wars” minutiae or refers to himself (with his small, lean frame in mind) as a “dainty dude.”

“I always shoot for the moon in my work, so that I’m happy when I land on the roof,” Mr. Criss said, a phrase he used twice during an interview at an Upper West Side diner. “I’m very specific and ambitious in plotting out my goals and never take no for an answer — so it’s not like things just fall in my lap.”

This three-week offer to play Finch, relatively rare for a newcomer to Broadway, is the latest height in a dizzying rise for Mr. Criss, who became a literal overnight sensation after his first appearance on “Glee” in November 2010.

In that episode Mr. Criss — playing a gay member of a high school choir being eyed by a series regular — sang vocals covering “Teenage Dream,” a pop hit by Katy Perry. Other “Glee” cast recordings had been released to success on Billboard charts, but “Teenage Dream” became a meteoric seller.

Soon the curly-haired, dark-eyed Mr. Criss was an idol, appearing solo in GQ (under the headline “King of the High School Musical”) and on People  magazine’s Sexiest Men Alive list. This season he became a main character on “Glee,” a promotion he said he had no reason to expect a year ago.

Television fame remains a little surreal to Mr. Criss, given that he grew up in San Francisco, working in theater. He appeared in plays more than musicals as a teenager and college student, developing a love for commedia dell’arte  in Goldoni’s “Servant of Two Masters” and notching an early romantic role as Peter van Daan, the love interest of the title character in “The Diary of Anne Frank.”

At the University of Michigan, a training ground for Broadway singers like Gavin Creel and Hunter Foster, Mr. Criss said he had never done a musical until he wrote one with friends. “A Very Potter Musical,” their parody of the Harry Potter books and movies, became a cult hit on campus; a filmed performance has drawn millions of views on YouTube, and Mr. Criss and his collaborators soon formed their own theater company, StarKid Productions, in Chicago.

In between “Glee” shoots last season, he wrote the music and lyrics for the company’s musical called “Starship,” which he referred to as “my baby.” It ran at the Hoover-Leppen Theater in Chicago last winter, drawing mixed reviews from critics but gathering a fan following on StarKid’s YouTube channel. (His moxie extends to the hope of seeing “Starship” or another StarKid show on Broadway in the next five years.)

“Starship” was typical of the “four or five projects” that Mr. Criss said he had going at one time, relying on e-mail and iPhone applications to help him stay working beyond “Glee” land. In fact, he described his eight-performances-a-week schedule in “How to Succeed” as “the easiest thing I’ve done in a while, in the best sense,” compared with “Glee” shoots that can begin at 6 a.m.

“This lifestyle isn’t so different from when my mom drove me from theater rehearsal to soccer practice to violin lessons in a single day,” said Mr. Criss, whose boyish face was masked by modish black-rimmed glasses and the light beard he often grows when he’s away from “Glee.”

Even though he looked different from his “Glee” character, Blaine Anderson, a succession of fans came over in the diner to ask for autographs, including three tween girls from Buenos Aires who were briefly dumbstruck when he asked how to spell their names.

Mr. Criss credited his parents with “giving me a sense of humility and the good judgment about how to spend every day.” Those instincts, he said, led him in 2010 to meet with the film and theater producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, who were impressed with his “Glee” work.

Soon afterward, as they were producing “How to Succeed” with Broadway Across America, Mr. Zadan and Mr. Meron said they asked Mr. Criss to consider filling in during Mr. Radcliffe’s two weeks off in September. Mr. Criss was game, but Mr. Radcliffe ended up skipping his vacation. (He did not miss a single performance in his 10-month run.)

The producers then proposed having Mr. Criss succeed Mr. Radcliffe, and the “Glee” producers agreed to let him out for three weeks (to which he added his two-week winter vacation for rehearsals). The Broadway producers said they would be delighted to have him return to the musical during a future “Glee” hiatus.

“We’d also definitely be up for finding another show for Darren, once he is not tied down to ‘Glee,’ ” said Mr. Zadan, who added that so-called Gleeks, StarKid fans and others have helped sell out Tuesday night’s opening performance and made ticket sales for the three-week run “very strong.”

Mr. Ashford, the director, acknowledged that many actors feel that they don’t settle into a solid performance until they have spent several weeks onstage, but he predicted that Mr. Criss would find his footing quickly.

“He is rehearsing and perfecting musical numbers every day on ‘Glee,’ and he comes to us with skills already,” he said. “I think by the end of three weeks he’ll be giving, at the least, a version of his best possible performance.”

Mr. Criss was still mastering his lines for “How to Succeed” last week, yet he laughed a little dismissively when asked if he was wishing he’d spent his “Glee” winter break on a tropical vacation with a lady friend. (Though he is straight, the series has made him a gay role model; as for his love life, he declined to comment.) Mr. Criss also politely shrugged off the idea that he was giving Broadway a try to stretch as an actor.

“To say something was a stretch would mean I was intimidated by something,” he said. “But I love challenges that are big and hard. I mean, part of me would love to be a fat tenured professor of theater someday.”
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Glee" anybody? Does Darren Criss succeed in Broadway's 'How to Succeed'?
« Reply #131 on: January 06, 2012, 10:03:57 am »



.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Glee" anybody? Does Darren Criss succeed in Broadway's 'How to Succeed'?
« Reply #132 on: January 06, 2012, 10:26:26 am »



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3I9xK_Igmi4#![/youtube]



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVDYSC4fhSI[/youtube]



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWgrc_Ce9oc[/youtube]



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xk_xTVXjhb8[/youtube]
.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Glee" anybody? Does Darren Criss succeed in Broadway's 'How to Succeed'?
« Reply #133 on: January 06, 2012, 10:38:14 am »



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LVmRmzVGg8[/youtube]
Darren managed to shush the crowd outside the stage door to say:
"To anybody that can hear the sound of my voice, thank you from
the bottom of my heart. This is a very special night for me, so thank you"



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkVYDxPYAE8[/youtube]
.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Glee" anybody? Does Darren Criss succeed in Broadway's 'How to Succeed'?
« Reply #134 on: January 06, 2012, 11:10:26 am »


http://popwatch.ew.com/2012/01/05/darren-criss-how-to-succeed-broadway/


On the Scene:
Does Darren Criss succeed
in Broadway's 'How to Succeed' ?
Yes and no.


by Aubry D'Arminio
Jan 5 2012 04:25 PM ET




Baby, it was cold outside last night on the long, long line (1.5 New York blocks) to see Darren Criss in Broadway’s How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.  But below-freezing temperatures (or the Hirschfeld Theatre’s assigned seating) don’t mean a thing to Darren Criss fans. Neither do heights, apparently — ask the girls from Toronto and Long Island who scaled trees and columns to glimpse the singer outside the stage door after the performance. Nor are fans deterred by long trips from as far away as North Carolina, California, and New Zealand.  “My daughter is a huge, huge, huge Glee fan,” said Canadian Kelly Bender, mother of one of the tree climbers, “so absolutely we came to see him.”
 
Gleeks are a dedicated pack — and as far as Broadway audiences go, a fun one. Last night (Criss’ third Broadway performance in his three-week run) was certainly a love-in. Whoops and screams greeted the singer the minute he rose from the stage floor as J. Pierrepont Finch, the show’s window washer-turned–ad man, and they basically didn’t stop until the curtain dropped nearly three hours later. The laughs were loud, the claps were plentiful, and the excitement when Glee  costar Jane Lynch surfaced in the audience during intermission was intense. Lynch’s exit out a side door just after the final curtain nearly caused a stampede when an entire mob changed directions to follow her. Police barricades were required at the stage door to keep signature-hunters from spilling out onto the road; half the waiting fans were ushered across the street. I almost wrestled a guy who snatched my Playbill, but he was big — Beiste-size big.
 
So is Criss deserving of the hoopla? As a star, yes, but as Broadway star, not yet. Slipping into Pierrepont’s purple bow tie seemed a stretch for Criss, who admittedly only had two weeks to rehearse. He twisted his tongue on several lines. He couldn’t land a joke. He danced less challenging choreography than his predecessor, Daniel Radcliffe, had. And, most surprisingly, he was out of tune in several numbers. His voice simply sounded thin — too weak for the large Hirschfeld Theatre and certainly too weak for the role of brazen schemer Finch. Criss did excel at harmonizing (his duets and trios were outstanding) and jumping on furniture, which are two things we already know he’s good at from Glee.
 
That’s not to say that Criss doesn’t belong on stage; How to Succeed  may not be an ideal vehicle for his talents. He can’t “Fosse, Fosse, Fosse.” He can’t belt. “His voice just isn’t fit for this kind of part,” admitted Criss fan Adrienne Bouchet, a 21-year-old neuroscience major who had seen yesterday’s matinee and then returned for the evening performance. “It doesn’t really show it off. It doesn’t have the same kind of panache.” She’s right: Criss would be better served by a more modern score (like the upcoming movie-to-stage musical Once ) and more contemporary choreography (In the Heights ). And that’s not a terrible thing. So take heed, Broadway producers: You have a real draw here. Cast in the right role and given enough rehearsal time, Criss could definitely succeed as a Broadway star. Right now, he’ll be keeping New York’s finest very busy outside the stage door for two and a half more weeks.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: "Glee" anybody?
« Reply #135 on: January 08, 2012, 08:25:07 pm »


http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/2012/01/lea-michele-chris-colfer-wont-be-getting-glee-spin-off-will-return-next-season.html


Lea Michele, Chris Colfer
Won't Be Getting Glee Spin-Off,
Will Return Next Season


By Josef Adalian
Today at 4:11 PM




It looks like Ryan Murphy and Team Glee  are closer to figuring out how to handle the pending graduation of several key characters, including those played by Lea Michele, Cory Monteith and Chris Colfer. When last we left the drama over the future of the Fox musical drama, co-creator Ryan Murphy told Deadline  that plans for a spin-off were on hold and that a decision on whether to revive them would be made in 2012. Well, the verdict is in: "There will not be a Glee spin-off," Fox Entertainment chief Kevin Reilly said definitively Sunday at his network's portion of the semi-annual TV Critics Association press tour.  However, Michele, Colfer, et. al., "are graduating," Reilly says. So they're leaving the show? Probably not.

When asked by reporters whether Michele would return, Reilly said the actress "will still be part of the show." Afterward, when asked to clarify the status of Michele and the other graduating seniors, Reilly admitted that he hadn't yet "looked at all of the contractual situations" of the actors. "But we'd like to have all of them back," he said. As for just how the Glee  producers plan to include former high school students in a show about high school, Reilly would only say that Murphy has come up with "a cool idea for next season" and that he couldn't say more. Later, Vulture asked if perhaps producers were mulling a show-within-a-show, or a split focus where some episodes would be set in Lima and others in whatever new universe is created for the former McKinley students. "I'm alluding to some version of that, but I don't want to get ahead of myself," he said.

While Reilly's remarks on Glee  might seem a bit vague, they were actually among the more definitive pronouncements of the day, at least when it came to existing shows. The Fox chief said he still hasn't figured out whether to renew Terra Nova, House,  or Fringe.  "We've done a good job avoiding some of these big decisions," he quipped. Reilly sounded like a man who wants to renew Nova,  however, praising the show as a success despite what he conceded were some creative hiccups. The other two shows, however, may see their fates come down to financial issues, with Reilly noting that both shows carry hefty price tags. He promised House  producers would get the chance to resolve storylines should this end up being its final season, and he also begged Fringe  fans to hold off campaigning for the show's survival just yet. "Please don't start the letter-writing campaign," he said. "I can't take it." Reilly even begged off on the matter of whether The X Factor  will bring back host Steve Jones, saying only that Ryan Seacrest has proven he's worth the big bucks he currently makes (and perhaps the big raise he'll likely get as part of his latest contract negotiation).

Reilly did have a few rock-solid things to announce. He unveiled Fox's plans to create a new Saturday late-night animation block designed to foster new toon talent. Former Adult Swim programming chief Nick Weidenfeld has been appointed to run a new unit in charge of developing shows for both the late-night lineup and for a new digital animation platform Fox plans to create. Producer Hend Baghdady (Warren the Ape ) will serve as exec in charge of production for the unit, which will produce up to 50 digital short-form programs each year, starting this year. The late-night block will debut next January and is expected to start off with four series per season.  One series which will not be part of Fox's future: The low-rated and critically reviled Jonah Hill toon Allen Gregory.  Reilly said the series has been cancelled.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: "Glee" anybody?
« Reply #136 on: January 10, 2012, 05:54:53 pm »



http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/2012/01/darren-criss-on-his-broadway-debut-glee-fans-getting-backstage-and-playing-kristen-wiigs-love-interest.html


Darren Criss on His Broadway Debut,
Glee  Fans Getting Backstage,
and Playing Kristen Wiig’s
Love Interest

By Bennett Marcus
Today at 3:00 PM




Darren Criss sings a lot on Glee  and gives impromptu performances on promenades and at benefits — but are you ready for him to sing Backstreet Boys on the big screen? Well, it’s definitely happening, Imogene co-director Shari Springer Berman told Vulture. Criss, who plays Kristen Wiig’s much younger love interest in the movie, will act as a sorta-kinda-Jersey guy “in a nineties impersonation band,” Berman said. “I made him work really hard.” Berman was one of many guests, including Alan Cumming and Susan Sarandon, at the Darby in New York last night, where Criss was being feted by the Peggy Siegal Company and Calvin Klein Collection for his three-week stint on Broadway. (He's replaced Daniel Radcliffe as the lead in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying ; later this month, Nick Jonas will take on the role.) We spoke with Criss — who performed five songs at the intimate event, including his piano-ballad rendition of “Teenage Dream” — about the challenges of Broadway, Glee  fans getting backstage, and acting opposite Kristen Wiig.



It’s been about a week since you’ve been on Broadway.
I know, yes. It’s been insane.


So what have you learned?
Well, I’ve learned that Daniel Radcliffe is a freaking superhero. You know, I know exactly what I signed up for … I’m very fortunate that it was a three-week run, and there’s the pro and cons: The pro is that you’re in and you’re out. But the con is also, oh, bummer, by the time you’re at three weeks you’ve gotten really in the swing of things, you have to leave. It’s kind of bittersweet. But because I know that’s the amount of time I’m doing it, I’ve kind of exerted my energy in sort of … what’s the word I’m looking for? Accordingly. I’ve been exerting energy accordingly, whereas Dan was doing it for a better half of a year, so I don’t know how he paced himself, because I would have just puttered out, man. [Laughs. ]


What’s been the sort of most amazing moment about this whole experience, when you said, “Wow!”?
I mean, God, I’m so inarticulate about the whole experience because it’s been so overwhelming. It’s everything that all of my Broadway friends said it would be, which is complete and total elation, you know, at the end of the show. The fun thing about doing live theater is that there’s a sort of real-time catharsis and there’s a real sense of immediacy of creating it then, there, and now, and the audience and the people onstage are really experiencing something together. And there’s a rush to that that cannot be defined into words. When you’re doing TV and film it’s very secluded, and it’s inherently sort of compartmentalized into different things.


Have there been any snafus? Cell phones ringing in the audience, missed cues, split pants?
My opening night, I have an electric shaver, it broke in the sink. You know, they combust very easily; if you press one button, the springs and all kinds of stuff fall apart and they kind of combusted in my hands. But nobody saw it and I put it together in the knick of time before you saw it again. So it never happened.


You were shaving your beard?
In the show, yes. But yes, I had a little winter beard before that.


The Times  said you grow a beard when you’re off the Glee  set.
Well, when I don’t have to shave I don’t shave. [Laughs. ]


What about working with Beau Bridges? He told me before it began that you have to jump over him.
Yes, I do. Was he being figurative or was he saying [laughs ] metaphorically I have to leap over his talent?


He was being literal. He said you have to leap over him, he hoped you had hops.
Yeah, there’s a number where we’re sort of jumping around and playing a little leapfrog, and, uh, I certainly do jump over Beau. But he’s, obviously, such a talented, wonderful man, and he’s one of these guys that’s been in the business forever, so my fun experience has just been picking his brain. [Whispers ]: Tell me stories. Tell me Elizabeth Taylor stories. You know, Tell me anything you’ve got. And he will. So he’s been a delight to work with.


Nick Jonas is going to take your place, and you are taking Daniel Radcliffe’s place. Have you met either of them?
I’ve met both. And Dan has been nothing short of a complete gentleman, and so supportive and available to me. He made that very clear when we met, if I had any questions or concerns — and this was during the remainder of his run. I told him at one point, like, “Hey, man, that is so nice of you, but I won’t come bugging you. Enjoy yourself, you know, this is a very significant and emotional time for you. I’d hate to bug you during your last week.” But all the same, he was very open and said if you want to talk or anything and talk about the show or the character, I’d be happy to give some pointers. And I certainly haven’t felt held back from doing that. Nick is a phenomenal musician, a phenomenal talent; unlike me and Dan, this is not his first time at the rodeo. This is a welcome home for him, for Broadway. He’ll be just fine. It’s us newbies you’ve got to worry about. [Laughs. ]


Any fun stories about the Glee  fans that have been coming to the show and crowding the stage door?
Uh, yeah. The cool thing for me is that a lot of the fans that have come backstage that I’ve met are fans that have been with me since before Glee.  And those are the people that are really touching to me. And all the Starkids — I have a production company called Starkid, and, obviously, Glee  kids. Of course there’s the Glee  kids. But I sort of expect that because there’s an exposure level there that’s a little more palpable. But it’s nice when I see the people that have been there since the beginning, that knew me from nothing and now know me on Broadway. So it’s a pretty special wheel.


You did the movie Imogene  with Kristen Wiig. What was that like?
Like a big old smile. I haven’t seen it yet, but it’s a delightful little story.


What was it like working with Kristen Wiig?
Amazing. She’s incredible. I mean, what is there to say that hasn’t already been said about Kristen Wiig? She’s a phenomenal star, and she deserves everything that’s coming her way right now.


When you performed Katy Perry's “Teenage Dream,” you said it was the song that changed your life. Can you elaborate on that?
Do I really need to? I was a struggling actor, a part-time composer, and all of a sudden they put me in a blazer, slick my hair back, and give me a Katy Perry song on a hit show, and a year and a half later I’m on Broadway. So, yes, it’s the song that changed my life.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: "Glee" anybody?
« Reply #137 on: January 18, 2012, 10:13:11 am »

http://www.tvline.com/2012/01/glee-season-3-rachels-dads-brian-stokes-mitchell-jeff-goldblum/


Glee  Exclusive:
Rachel's Gay Dads
Revealed!


By Michael Ausiello
January 17, 2012 07:52 PM PST



Brian Stokes Mitchell  and Jeff Goldblum


As far as parental cliffhangers go, it’s second only to the identity of the Mother on a certain CBS sitcom: Glee  has finally cast Rachel’s gay dads, and TVLine can reveal which musically-inclined actors landed the plum parts.
 
A show insider confirms to TVLine exclusively that onetime Law & Order: Criminal Intent  detective Jeff Goldblum and Broadway veteran Brian Stokes Mitchell have been tapped to play Hiram and LeRoy Berry, the adoptive parents of Lea Michele’s character.
 
The duo will first appear in the show’s Valentine’s Day episode — which as luck would have it will actually air on Feb. 14, and is titled “Heart.” And yes, they will sing.
 
Although Goldblum is best known for his movie and TV work, he’s also an accomplished jazz pianist who made his Broadway debut back in 1971 in the Tony-winning musical Two Gentleman in Verona.
 
Mitchell, meanwhile, is something of a Great White Way legend, having appeared in dozens of high-profile productions including Jelly’s Last Jam, Ragtime, Man of La Macha  and Kiss Me Kate  (for which he won a 2000 Tony Award for Best Actor.) His TV credits include playing Kelsey Grammer’s onscreen nemesis on Frasier  and a love interest for Vanessa WilliamsWilhelmina on Ugly Betty.
 
Thoughts?!
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: "Glee" anybody?
« Reply #138 on: January 18, 2012, 10:52:18 am »
Quote
Thoughts?!

Yeah. I'm so old I always think of Brian Stokes Mitchell first as Dr. "Jackpot" Jackson on TV's Trapper John, M.D.  :-\

(Of course, that means BSM is no spring chicken, either.  ;))
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Kelda

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Re: "Glee" anybody?
« Reply #139 on: January 21, 2012, 04:59:52 pm »
Like the idea of Jeff G...

But we saw pics of her Dads in her locker in the first ever episode. And one of them was Black!

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