Author Topic: Counting Down to the End of....Downton Abbey  (Read 134665 times)

Offline ifyoucantfixit

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #80 on: January 16, 2012, 09:28:48 am »
These boys are too cute!

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DW9WZQi4Vpw&feature=related[/youtube]


       Oh thank you!!  That was awesome.



     Beautiful mind

Offline brian

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #81 on: January 16, 2012, 02:18:50 pm »
They are repeating series 2 here now. I watched for half an hour but it is really too soon to see it again. I did pick up more of Maggie's one liners after reading the review here  When I saw the adverts I thought it was for series 3 but I gather that is not showing until the 2nd half of the year.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #82 on: January 16, 2012, 09:48:02 pm »

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/downton-abbey/8789982/Downton-Abbey-Theres-a-wedding-a-funeral-and-a-sex-scene.-Guess-which-one-Im-in....html


Downton Abbey:
'There’s a wedding, a funeral and a
sex scene. Guess which one I’m in...

Everyone is wondering what will become of Lady Mary.
Actress Michelle Dockery lets us into a few secrets about
playing Downton Abbey ’s leading lady.


By Glenda Cooper
27 Sep 2011 6:30AM BST



Downton Abbey's Matthew Crawley (Dan Stevens) and Lady Mary
(Michelle Dockery)



If Matthew Crawley, the middle-class lawyer turned heir to an earldom, had not already been sent to the trenches in the new series of Downton Abbey,  then public outcry would seen him dispatched there anyway. For Crawley (Dan Stevens) broke his cousin Lady Mary ’s heart by turning up with a new fiancée, of whom the Dowager Countess sniffily remarked: “I suppose looks aren’t everything.”
 
“Matthew is happy, and that’s all that matters to Mary,” asserts Michelle Dockery, the actress who plays Lady Mary. “She’s still deeply in love and full of regret, but she has to move on.”
 
Ah yes, the complicated love life of Lady Mary – the cold and snobbish eldest daughter of the Earl of Grantham – has proved one of the biggest draws of Downton.  In the first series, the naughty aristocrat managed to smuggle a Turkish diplomat into her bed, where he promptly (and inconveniently) expired.

Now with her on-off entanglement with Matthew clearly off, she is considering a proposal from newspaper magnate Sir Richard Carlisle (Iain Glen) – but with such a scandalous past, is it wise to get involved? Particularly as Matthew’s fiancée Lavinia and Sir Richard have a secret that links them...

No wonder 10 million of us tuned in for the latest instalment of Julian Fellowes’s tale of battles among the bustles, figures which trounced the BBC’s Spooks.  The series has not only scooped four Emmys, but has just been named by the Guinness Book of Records as the most critically acclaimed TV show.

Forget the clunking lines (William, the footman, now clearly designated as First World War cannon fodder, says of his desire to get to the battlefield, “I’ll be beggared if it’s over before I get there”) and the coincidences (Matthew and evil footman Thomas bump into each other during a battle that claimed 623,000 casualties on the Allied side alone), the period drama is perfect Sunday night fare: sex, blackmail and wonderful gowns.
 
Yet the actress who plays Lady Mary says the aristocrat would have had nothing to do with her in real life: “Oh, no – Lady Mary would never have talked to me – I’d have been in service,” says Essex girl Dockery. “In fact, I asked my nan recently if any of our family had been in service, and she reckons they were.”
 
Dockery’s porcelain-white skin and cut-glass tones would give any Lady a run for their money, but in reality she comes from Chadwell Heath, her father is a former lorry driver turned surveyor and her mother delivers meals on wheels.
 
Despite having no theatrical bent themselves, her parents encouraged their youngest daughter to pursue acting. “I think my parents knew before I did that I was going to be an actress because I was doing impressions of Margaret Thatcher at the age of four.”
 
Her A-level drama teacher helped Dockery, now 29, apply for a three-week course at the National Youth Theatre (“I walked in and it was like winning the lottery; I knew this was what I wanted to do”). She then took a year out to save up to go to the Guildhall drama school – jobs included working in a newspaper recruitment office and as an assistant at the NYT. Her big break came in 2008 as Eliza Doolittle in Sir Peter Hall’s production where she won rave reviews and was spotted by a Downton  producer.
 
Dockery muses on the reasons for the show’s success: “It feels like a familiar period drama. But because it’s not a remake, or an adaptation of Austen or Dickens, the audience is seeing these stories for the first time and so they feel it is theirs. And no one knows the ending of an episode, in the way you would if it was an Austen adaptation.”
 
There was some cynicism whether ITV could pull off a high-production-value drama (each episode cost £1 million). Dockery says that scrupulous attention to detail put paid to that. “We have Alistair Bruce, a historian on set… Even when we’re just in the background of a scene, we’re given dialogue that’s scripted and when we’re not eating we have to put our hands in our lap.
 
“Julian [Fellowes] gets very annoyed if he watches something back and it’s not correct. One of the footmen wasn’t wearing gloves in one scene and Hugh [Bonneville] was wearing the wrong suit for walking in another, and we had to reshoot.”
 
The second series runs from 1916-1919 and features scenes from the trenches, while Downton Abbey is being turned into a convalescent home for soldiers. “It wouldn’t feel right if too much time was taken away from the house,” says Dockery. “The abbey itself is like a character.”
 
Lady Mary herself now has decisions to make. At 26, and “dangerously close to being on the shelf”, she becomes involved with Sir Richard, despite her father declaring that he doesn’t want “a hawker of newspaper scandal” in the house. “[Sir Richard’s] right for her in many ways,” says Dockery. “It’s like a business partnership rather than a romance. They would do well together in society, but Matthew is always there.
 
The problem is that they have this friendship – they become good friends in the second series.” (In fact, Dockery and Stevens are good friends; they had worked together on the BBC’s The Turn of the Screw. )
 
Lady Mary also has to get her hands dirty in the war effort. “She has to muck in… she does even end up wearing an apron at one point.” Unthinkable! For one of Downton ’s highlights is the fabulous clothes that Lady Mary wears. Although she is in casual jumper and jeans today, Dockery yearns for more formal times.
 
“I think we’ve lost our femininity a little,” she says. “It was a wonderful period when you would dress for dinner. Even wearing your Sunday best for church – it’s a shame we’ve lost that.”
 
In this series, though, Downton’s clothes have become slightly more comfortable – “In two outfits I’m not even wearing a corset!” – a relief to the actress given the 12-hour days and six-day weeks spent filming.
 
During breaks, Dockery says she would “take out my guitar and sit with Elizabeth [McGovern, who plays the Countess] with our skirts hoicked up playing country music. Otherwise, I hang out with Laura Carmichael and Jessica Brown-Findlay [who play her younger sisters] watching Mad Men  on our laptops.”
 
Singing with McGovern on set blossomed into a collaboration: Dockery is recording backing vocals for McGovern’s band, Sadie and the Hotheads.
 
An accomplished jazz singer, she’s also working with the famous Ronnie Scott’s club, as well as rehearsing for Joe Wright’s new film, Anna Karenina.  Outside work, she lives with her architect boyfriend in fashionable Clerkenwell.
 
But her main priority is the remaining two weeks of filming at Highclere for the Downton  Christmas special, and she’s cautious about what she can reveal. Could the flu pandemic remove inconvenient characters to bring Mary and Matthew together? “Everyone gets caught up in the flu pandemic one way or another.”
 
Dockery goes on: “So much of the fate of Downton  depends on Matthew’s choice of wife. They [Matthew and Mary] are an ideal pairing. The audience will be rooting for them, like the family is. But Mary missed her chance. It’ll be interesting to see how the audience take to Lavinia and Carlisle – maybe they’ll change their minds.”
 
But what firm details can she give? “There’s a wedding, a funeral and a sex scene. I’m in two – no, wait,” she corrects herself. “I’m in one of those. The thing is, I can see people will think that I am involved in a particular one of those three, but I’m not. People will be really surprised.”
 
“And I can say that the incident with the Turkish diplomat comes back to haunt Mary in the second series. I can’t tell you why, but it could literally bring down the whole of the Crawley family – it’s huge.”
 
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #83 on: January 16, 2012, 10:12:44 pm »


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/downton-abbey/8782648/Downton-Abbey-ITV1-episode-two-review.html


Downton Abbey
ITV1, episode two, review
Serena Davies gets emotional over the second episode of
the new series of ITV1's popular period soap Downton Abbey.


By Serena Davies
25 Sep 2011 10:15PM BST



Sir Richard Carlisle (Iain Glen) and Lady Mary (Michelle Dockery) in
episode two of the second series of Downton Abbey



Well it didn’t take long for emotions to run as high as those preposterous spires that jostle for position along the upper reaches of Downton Abbey itself. If it wasn’t the unspoken passion of Lady Mary, it was Anna’s stricken little face after Bates’s abandonment of her, or Edith’s dismay at her fast-thwarted amour for the local farmer.
 
And that was just the romance, which we got in pre-war Downton  too. But now there’s bodily harm to deal with as well. Tonight there was shell shock, a suicide and the execution of Mrs Padmore’s nephew for cowardice. Rarely has a second episode of a long series been so packed with miserable incidents.

The Great War is looking like it’s going to cast a very serious pall indeed over Downton Abbey, as of course it must. And (Julian) Fellowes’s decision to concentrate on those at home rather than the soldiers at the front is proving an excellent one, giving the viewer some genuine insight into the helpless anxiety of those who were left behind.

It was left to the Dowager Countess alone to give us the occasional laugh. Her monopoly of all the decent lines grows only greater, or perhaps Maggie Smith’s performance is soaring to even more impressive heights. “The truth is neither here nor there, it’s the look of the thing that matters,” was my favourite of the night. In joint second came the admonition to Edith over her eagerness to drive: “This is not Toad of Toad Hall!” (Yes, Fellowes has done his research – The Wind in the Willows  came out in 1908). And her dismissal of the pedigree of the family her daughter married into: “They were no great threat to the Plantagenets.”

In all it was a wonderful episode, if one requiring hankies. The one small caveat is that Lady Mary’s new beau, the alarmingly bourgeois Sir Richard Carlisle (that’s not a hereditary “Sir”), seems far too soft spoken and inoffensive to be quite the threat to propriety the Dowager Countess and the rest of her family seem to believe him to be. But then Iain Glen, who plays him, is a subtle, clever actor, and can do nasty with the best of them when the moment truly requires it.
 
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #84 on: January 16, 2012, 10:38:17 pm »


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/8769654/How-Downton-minds-its-manners.html


How Downton 
minds its manners

Vicki Power meets Alastair Bruce,
the royal equerry in charge of
historical accuracy and etiquette
on Downton Abbey
.

By Vicki Power
16 Sep 2011 7:03PM BST



Downton Abbey:  etiquette expert Alastair Bruce.


As Downton Abbey  swept us magically back to Edwardian England last year, within its vast fanbase was a small but vocal contingent who took to the internet to decry the drama’s perceived anachronisms. Rather like the moths that Bates strives to keep away from the Earl of Grantham’s suits, they seemed to relish picking holes in it.

So, with a new series starting tomorrow, it’s worth noting that Downton ’s producers actually go to great lengths to ensure that everything from manners to medals are suitably “period”. Their historical adviser, present on set nearly every day, knows more about etiquette – or “protocol” as he prefers to call it – than Mrs Patmore has cooked hot dinners.

He is Alastair Bruce OBE, 51, Queen’s herald, Territorial Army colonel and equerry to Prince Edward. We meet on a rainy day at Highclere Castle during the filming of the new series.

He is dressed as a First World War colonel, since he’s being an extra for the day, for fun. But Bruce’s main job is to keep an eye on everyone else. “Today I’m trying to get the extras playing soldiers – some of whom look like a sack of potatoes in uniform – to stand in a military manner,” says Bruce, in the finely modulated tones of the well bred.

An expert on the British monarchy, heraldry, medals and country house etiquette, Bruce is an impressive repository of information. As Sky News’s commentator at the royal wedding, for example, he broke the story that David Beckham was wearing his OBE on the wrong lapel. “I almost wish I hadn’t done it now,” he says. “I wouldn’t have wanted to embarrass him.”
 
Bruce’s remit for Downton  covers everything from how doors are opened to how a character gets out of a car. In fact, automobile egress remains preoccupation of today’s filming: a general’s entourage is arriving at Downton. “We’re using a vintage Rolls-Royce, and the person who owns the car said that the best way to come out of it is backwards, but you can’t have a general sticking his bum out at the people waiting to greet him,” chuckles Bruce. “Also military people always turn up with their caps on, and if you arrived with a cap you simply could not get out of that car while the roof was on.” So the car’s roof is being removed.
 
It’s the second change Bruce has requested today. In a dining scene, “the director wanted the food to be brought in the same door the family enters through,” snorts Bruce. “I thought to myself, ‘I don’t think so!’ It has to come in from the servery.”
 
Table protocol is a particular Bruce bugbear. For example, he never puts Lord and Lady Grantham (Hugh Bonneville and Elizabeth McGovern) at either end of the dining table: “It’s twaddle that they would sit at the ends.” In fact, they would sit in the middle. “From there you have much more chance to interact and control what’s going on. The ends of the table are more junior positions.”
 
Then there’s the posture problem. “Most of the younger generation have not been brought up to sit up straight,” says Bruce. “But 100 years ago children would not have been allowed to sit at the dinner table until they had learned to.”
 
Bruce has also had the shoe brushes changed, spotted the wrong rank on the shoulder of one of Bonneville’s uniforms and asked the same actor to take his hands out of his pockets (an anachronism).
 
While Bruce says it would be “arrogant” to assume he gets everything right, an hour in his company suggests he firmly believes there is always a correct way of doing things. “I was in the Scots Guards,” he says. “That gave me a desire to deliver the best, because, to them, excellence is the only thing that matters.” Downton ’s authenticity, it seems, is in safe hands.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #85 on: January 16, 2012, 11:51:00 pm »

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/8769641/Downton-Abbey-is-sheer-fantasy-says-historian.html


Downton Abbey
is sheer fantasy, says historian
Downton Abbey ’s portrayal of country house life is sanitised fantasy,
according to the historian and broadcaster A.N. Wilson
.
 
By Anita Singh, Showbusiness Editor
17 Sep 2011 7:00AM BST





So dismayed is A.N. Wilson by the perceived inaccuracies in ITV1’s period drama, which returns to our screens tomorrow, that he turned the airwaves blue when discussing it on BBC Radio 4’s Today  programme.
 
““We all know that during the years before and after the First World War, life was miserable for most people and we did need a re-ordering of society. And I don’t want to be too serious about it, but the idea that Downton Abbey  represents this country’s finest hour is b-------, basically,” Wilson said.
 
He immediately apologised for his language, while John Humphrys, the Today  presenter, spluttered: “I’m not sure we allow that word on the air.”
 
Wilson explored the Downton Abbey  era in his book, After the Victorians, and said it was far removed from the world created by Julian Fellowes.
 
“Of course it’s harmless fun and I’m not going to suggest that people sitting down on their sofas need to be engaged in gritty Marxist realism on a Sunday evening,” he said.
 
“Nevertheless, Julian Fellowes has claimed that Downton Abbey  - which is sheer fantasy and a sanitised version of the past - is realistic and that we ought to go back to the old days.
 
“I’m not being po-faced about it, but a programme that depicted the real lives of servants would have been a very interesting one. It’s worth emphasising how dirty and how smelly life was for almost everybody before about 1950.”
 
Prof Alison Light, an academic and author of Mrs Woolf and Her Servants,  which explored the relationship between Virginia Woolf and her domestic staff, said that members of the Edwardian aristocracy were “mean and vindictive”.
 
“It is a very liberal fantasy and, if it’s nostalgia, it’s obviously for a time that didn’t exist,” she said of the programme.
 
“It is very paternalistic and benign and generous, and nobody is nasty to anyone. So it is very much of the present moment; it is not a depiction of the Edwardian years.
 
“This is fiction. It’s preposterous. It’s a romance.”
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #86 on: January 17, 2012, 07:16:55 pm »





Downton Abbey
Season 2, Episode 2

Downton Abbey  Recap:
Atonement

By Amanda Dobbins
Yesterday at 1:00 AM





In the first, mind-bogglingly dense two-hour episode of Downton Abbey,  the Granthams — and the servants who love them — did their best to keep on keeping on, in spite of the war raging just across the Channel. Carson, the Vaudeville star-turned-stuffy butler, spoke for most everyone in the house (Sybil and William excepted) when he insisted that standards be kept high and maids kept out of the dining room. Love triangles were still everyone's primary concern. But World War I can’t be sidelined forever, and it is the major character in this second episode, as Downton Abbey is turned into a convalescent home for wounded officers. Invalids in uniform are moved into spare bedrooms, the library is turned into a rec room, and every member of the household, upstairs and downstairs, is forced to confront some consequence of the war. It doesn't make for the most romantic hour of television (almost zero Matthew and Mary alone time! Unacceptable), but then wartime requires sacrifices of us all.
 
The hospital transformation is great news for two previously loathed characters who get a chance to act like humans — sympathetic humans, even — in this week's installment. Are you ready to forgive Lady Edith and O’Brien for their first season treachery? O'Brien, granted, has much bigger sins to atone for — Edith wrote a letter, while O'Brien, effectively, killed the Grantham's unborn son with a bar of soap. But season two O’Brien has discovered a heretofore unknown capacity for guilt (Thomas’s bewilderment in the courtyard reflects our own) and her daily machinations have taken on the air of, dare we say, penance. Consider her dressing room scheme of the week, which is actually executed in the interest of protecting Lady Grantham, rather than tricking Lady Grantham into asking Lord Grantham for something that Thomas and O'Brien want. And she even sticks up for the crazy valet with PTSD! (Let us just note that, given poor Lang's resemblance to Crispin Glover's Thin Man from Charlie's Angels,  this is really an act of charity on the part of O'Brien.) Whether O’Briens do-gooding is enough to make up for her truly heinous actions depends in large part on whether you hold O'Brien or Julian Fellowes ultimately responsible for the SoapSlip Affair (Real talk: they were never going to make a show about the infant heir of Downton Abbey) and, more cravenly, how much you want to see Matthew Crawley take over the house. But O'Brien is trying, at least, and we find ourselves unexpectedly open to the effort.

The sour Edith, meanwhile, has made her way out of the farmhouse and into the infirmary. (For the record, since we've heard some confusion: yes, that farmer was married, and yes, that blonde woman watching them was his wife. Remember in season one when Lady Edith called Lady Mary a slut?) Apparently philandering and tractor-driving can effect major personality change in mere days, because it’s a weirdly industrious Edith who starts taking book orders and learning patient names. More weirdly, the officers seem to actually appreciate her help. One particularly timid man, who's lost his hand, has heard enough kind things from the other patients to know that he should ask Edith for help writing a letter to his mother. Is his mother the Turkish ambassador? (Sorry.) Congrats to Laura Carmichael, who must be so relieved to have some bearable dialogue to work with--and who, to her credit, has a gentle, even likable bedside manner. Way better than Sybil’s, it should be noted.

Where then to direct our dissatisfaction, when Downton ’s two villains are on their best behavior? Branson’s bumbling revolutionary efforts might be a place to start. The insufferable servant's table sermonizing (“They won’t hurt [the Romanovs], why would they?” Oops!), the scowling, the barking at Lady Sybil--this is all very unbecoming behavior. But that plan to stop an enlistment parade and publicly throw the middle finger at the British government? As the glassy-eyed Sybil points out: that is really, really dumb. And even dumber is the actual protest that Branson comes incredibly close to executing, which involves an urn of garbage water and one of the desert explorers from The English Patient  reincarnated as a visiting general. Come on, Branson. How does a dirty general resolve your (legitimate) Easter Rising anger? And how are you ever going to get your pallid nurse down the aisle after that one? While we’re on the subject, why does it take a full two minutes and a game of Note Telephone for someone to get into the dining room and remove the Soup Urn of Terror? And if Carson thought that Branson was going to assassinate the general, then how did he know to immediately put the lockdown on the Soup Urn of Terror? Most important, was the brief unbuttoned shirt moment during Branson’s medical exam Downton ’s first attempt at partial male nudity, and did it make Branson any less irritating?

Joining Branson on the nuisance watchlist is Cousin Isobel, whose hospital-related tyranny is probably half the reason we’re willing to reconsider Edith, and the well-meaning but wildly nosy Mrs. Patmore. Daisy should probably also go on the list, but her brain is no longer of its own volition and does only what Mrs. Patmore tells it to do as the cook lurks in the back corner of literally every scene Daisy and William have together. “Oh, I’m just scrubbing my copper pan here because the light is best by the cupboard, but also, while I’m here, of course Daisy will marry you, William, no problem. This will all turn out great.” This will not turn out great. This has “death at the Somme” written all over it.

The other major downstairs concern is, of course, the stymied marriage plans of Saints Anna and Bates. We all love, or at least respect, Bates, and we are all sad that he’s been reduced to working in a pub and lurking behind trees in the village. (Yes, Bates’ lightning fast getaway from behind that tree is totally implausible--the guy can’t even serve a proper dinner, much less run through the park in record time--but allow Downton  its drama. This episode needed more.) Still, after yet another scene of earnest, against-all-odds lovey dovey promises, we wonder how long we can continue to be interested in Starcrossed Banna. Sweetness is hardly an exciting reason to root for a couple. And what’s the end game here--some steamy makeouts between the two most wholesome characters on Downton ? Anna can’t even believably sell her offer to take the mistress route, though that seems like a more promising storyline for everyone involved. Anna needs a little edge, and these two need more than stolen moments across a table.

Or maybe they need to learn how to make the best of those stolen table moments, as our preferred Will They or Won’t They Couple do on a weekly basis. Remember that first Mary-Matthew proposal in the dining room last season? Or last week’s unspoken asides during the Carlisle dinner? These are two people who know how to eye-fuck across a place setting, and that Downton  seems hellbent on preventing these opportunities is increasingly frustrating. Michelle Dockery’s abilities are wasted this week on a snooze of a Lavinia reveal--she does know Carlisle! They weren’t lovers! Politics!--and though Mary’s stiff-upper-lip struggle yields the best acting on the show, we’d all rather her agony be directed at Matthew. Especially since Lavina, with her tragic (recycled!) green velvet dress and pinched expression, is clearly never going to muster the backbone for a “Step off my man” showdown. Mary herself passes up such an opportunity this week, to the chagrin of Lady Rosamond and Mean Girls enthusiasts everywhere. It’s a smart move, probably, as falsely accusing Lavinia would alienate the hugely self-righteous Matthew, and it also reminds us that Mary is not the cold-hearted brat Edith would have everyone believe, but really--more Lavinia? And more smarmy Carlisle? A disappointed audience cues up the train scene once again.

Some stray observations: Ethel is headed down a bad, officer-related road, and Earl Grantham could do with an anger management class or two. Thomas seems to be the only character without a redemption arc, though frankly, his beef with Mr. Carson is the least of our worries--we have four love stories and a war to deal with here. That, probably, is a complaint that could be applied to the entirety of the episode, which focused too much on side characters and not enough on our most basic concerns: Banna’s happiness, Matthew and Mary’s longing, Sybil’s ability to emote enough to fall for Branson. But it’s a long war, and despite the hospital takeover and the loss of a few footmen, Downton hasn’t truly begun to feel the effects. The battlefield pairing of William and Matthew is more than a little troubling in that context, but at least our preferred heroes will be back in the spotlight. We hope. Everyone say a prayer like Mary, just in case.
 

And now, your weekly dose of Dowager Countess Wisdom:


"I don’t know many people who’d threaten me behind the laurels."

DC: "I’m going up to London to stay with Rosamond for a day or two, I think we’ll have Lavinia up for tea."
Mary: "You sound as if you’re going to gobble her up."
DC: "If only we could." [gleeful laughter]

On Rosamond’s new-money husband: "No, he was just cut and polished relatively recently."

DC: "If someone is going to manage things, let it be one of our creatures."
Isobel: "Why, are you planning to divide his loyalties?"
DC: "I wouldn’t say I was planning it."

"Really, Rosamond, there’s no need to be so gleeful. You sound like Robespierre, lopping off the head of Marie Antoinette." [gleeful laughter ]


« Last Edit: January 20, 2012, 10:58:10 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #87 on: January 19, 2012, 06:17:52 pm »


[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9I3YNNI9bxQ&feature[/youtube]
Uploaded by WatchinDownton on Jan 18, 2012

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Sason

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #88 on: January 19, 2012, 06:23:54 pm »
John, someone posted about Downton slash on Facebook.

Thought you might be interested.   8)


http://www.fanfiction.net/s/7412333/1/An_Evening_Stroll

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Have you been watching … (Julian Fellowes's) Downton Abbey?
« Reply #89 on: January 19, 2012, 06:33:23 pm »



John, someone posted about Downton slash on Facebook.

Thought you might be interested.   8)


http://www.fanfiction.net/s/7412333/1/An_Evening_Stroll


 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Thanks, Sonja!

 ;D

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"