Author Topic: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After  (Read 163123 times)

Offline Katie77

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - Will You Be Watching?
« Reply #310 on: December 04, 2012, 05:40:43 pm »
I've been in my job entirely too long. Yesterday, as soon as I heard that the duchess was suffering from "excessive morning sickness," the first thing that popped into my head was "hyperemesis gravidarum."

Sure enough, that's what they're calling it on this morning's news shows in the U.S.

I'm the suspicious kind, and the first thing I thought, was that this "morning sickness" thing was a cover up for her being in there for IVF or something like that.

Ever since the death of Princess Diana I've always been suspicious of what the Royal family could cover up. And when I read that Prince Charles bonked Camilla the night before he married Diana, it made me realise even more, that what you see with the royal family, is not exactly how it is. Everytime I see a clip of Diana and Charle's wedding now, I look at him and know exactly what he did the night before....UGH!!

Dont get me wrong, I still love reading about the Royal family, but I do so now, with a bit of cynicism.
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Offline Mandy21

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - Will You Be Watching?
« Reply #311 on: December 06, 2012, 12:32:04 pm »
I've been in my job entirely too long. Yesterday, as soon as I heard that the duchess was suffering from "excessive morning sickness," the first thing that popped into my head was "hyperemesis gravidarum."

Sure enough, that's what they're calling it on this morning's news shows in the U.S.

From Huff Post this morn:

"Solace was found in sleep and sex." -- Word!

~~~



Mary Haft.

..

 Hyperemesis Gravidarum: A Report From the Trenches

Posted: 12/05/2012 12:05 pm


Vindication. That's the word that comes to mind with the full-scale press that has descended upon the news that Prince William and his wife, Katherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, are expecting their first child and that she is in the hospital for treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum.

Even now, 20 years after the birth of my last child, I am strangely exhilarated by the validation of a medical condition that I suffered with through the pregnancies of all three of my children. I suspect more people than I knew thought I was exaggerating, that morning sickness is routine and I was somehow complaining about an all-too-common condition.

I was the first of my family to become pregnant, the first of most of my friends. About 2.5 years into marriage, worrying that perhaps after years of endometriosis, which I had been diagnosed with at age 18, I might never be able to have children, I had scheduled an appointment with a fertility specialist. Happiness was making that call to cancel, as I found myself pregnant. That glow dimmed as the sickness began.

Within weeks, I found myself plummeted to depths of suffering I had never imagined. Who knew pregnancy caused this? No one I knew had it. This isn't morning sickness. It's morning, noon, and night sickness and every minute in between. Solace was found in sleep and sex. Other than that, every waking second is a battle against a rising tide of crippling nausea that vomiting does not relieve.

Some 26 years after the birth of my first child, I still can't look at wild rice or plain chicken broth. It took me years to be able to eat matzo ball soup, as my mother-in-law, worried sick that I wasn't going to survive this pregnancy, came from dinner at Duke Zeiberts with a big container of soup. Hungry, as I was growing a child in there, I lapped it up. Not 10 minutes later, all of it came back up. Undigested. There is nothing worse than vomiting up undigested food. Whole pieces of it come pouring up in a flood of bile, splashing up in your face. I would shudder with revulsion and then be grateful when vomiting just fluid, not food.

There wasn't a day I felt well. Those pregnancy mothers, basking in the glow of maternal blossoming, were alien to me. In fact, I felt like I was nurturing an alien, a feeling confirmed by a close family friend who, having experienced the same kind of pregnancy, likened it to a parasite. You're the host, they are the organism and as they grow, they're killing you. Remarkably, my babies all got the nourishment they needed, even at my expense. At 5 foot 6 inches, very small-boned and under 110 pounds when I married, my weight dropped precipitously. A doctor's daughter, I prided myself on staying afloat. I knew all about applesauce and bananas and fruit juices to keep the electrolytes up. I tried everything else. Saltines, bread sticks, ginger tea, broth. None of it worked.

With my last child, a daughter after two boys, I lost my grip. Thankfully, one night after falling up the steps, I told my husband to watch out for me. Must have been a sixth sense, or God giving me a nudge, for I don't remember that next day. I only remember opening my eyes, in my own bed, and finding the deeply concerned eyes of dreamy Dr. Heintze looking down at me. Perilously sick, heading into shock, veins collapsing, I ended up on IVs, in my house, for weeks. To compound matters, one of the boys had strep, which I got as well. That necessitated additional infusions. Once a day, a nurse would come, unhook me, help me into a bath, then back into bed. That didn't stop the vomiting or nausea. Now I had to lift the whole contraption over the threshold of the bathroom and squeak my way to the toilet.

By then, there was the suggestion of medication to quell nausea, but I wasn't chancing that. Images of thalidomide babies swam through my head. Four months in, deeply afraid, I called my doctor and said, "I think I'm carrying twins." I was deeply afraid that if that feeling were true, I would lose both babies, as I was so ill. Unhooked from the thread of IVs, my husband took me to the doctor's. A sonogram revealed two small embryos, only one with a beating heart. I don't know how, but I just knew.

Even reading this now I think, "How did I do this three times?"

In fact, I did it five times. I lost two babies in pregnancies that ended, in both cases, at the beginning of the fourth month. In both cases, sonograms showed a perfect baby and we were told we could share our happy news with the world. We were past the point of worry. But what had worried me was that I wasn't sick like the other times. I was nauseated and fatigued, the kind of morning sickness that everyone complains about. But no complaints from me: I could leave my house. I could lead a normal life. Both times I went to my OB-GYN with a feeling that something wasn't right, an uneasiness that life was lost. The first time, I told my husband, called my doctor and went in. There was no sign of anything wrong, just a feeling. In the darkened room, my husband and the doctor laughed together over some shared story, neither worried, as all tests had been perfect. I was the one staring at the screen as the sonogram wand moved over my pregnant belly quietly, saying, "I don't see a heartbeat." The room stilled. The baby was lost.

The second time I didn't tell my husband. Waking on the morning of Yom Kippur, the day in the Jewish religion where one is written in the Book of Life, I had a deeply uneasy, sad feeling that something was wrong. I am Catholic, my husband Jewish, but I knew that on this day, I needed to check to make sure my baby would be written in the Book of Life. Alone I went. This time the doctor wasn't joking around; we both knew that it was a possibility. Even though, same as last time, every test looked perfect and the previous sonogram had showed a healthy fetus, I just wasn't as sick. But it was more than that. It was some deeply-rooted, intuitive connection to this beginning life that shadowed my visit. And my fears were confirmed with this final sonogram that again showed that tiny fetus with a heart now stilled.

In the end, hyperemesis was my salvation. My body's way of maintaining and preserving life.

Michael was born at 8 pounds, 21 inches. My first baby, first birth, first experience with natural childbirth, with no anesthesia. I didn't go into it intending to be brave; 26 years ago, epidurals commonly caused nausea and vomiting. During one of my last OB visits, the female doctor sympathetically nodded, recalling how she vomited during the labor and birth of her baby. That was enough for me. I could take pain, I just couldn't bear another minute of nausea and vomiting. I had no idea. Hours in, there was a millisecond moment when I thought I would mentally splinter from the pain, imagining myself fracturing all over the walls. In that millisecond I pulled myself back up, concentrated on a spot on the wall and just breathed.

Here is the miracle: The minute the baby was out of my body, illness was gone. I felt fabulous, on top of the world, a high like no other. A healthy, perfect baby boy was born. And with his birth, like the snap of a finger -- the cessation of sickness -- an instant return to exuberant health. And so it was for each of my babies. Michael, Nicholas, Laura. The instant they were born, so was I. Borne into motherhood, each child has been the gift of my life, hyperemesis gravidarum a small price to pay for the immeasurable joy of creating a family.
Dawn is coming,
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - Will You Be Watching?
« Reply #312 on: December 06, 2012, 07:12:12 pm »



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mary-haft/hyperemesis-gravidarum_b_2244977.html

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: A Report From the Trenches
Mary Haft
Posted: 12/05/2012 12:05 pm


Vindication. That's the word that comes to mind with the full-scale press that has descended upon the news that Prince William and his wife, Katherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, are expecting their first child and that she is in the hospital for treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum.

(...)


K with a Kate, yes, but it is a C with a Catherine when formally styled: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (no 'the').

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine,_Duchess_of_Cambridge






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Offline Katie77

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After
« Reply #313 on: December 06, 2012, 09:16:33 pm »
I think the subject TITLE here, should be changed to just .......WILLIAM AND KATE
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 01:27:51 am by Meryl »
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Offline Meryl

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After
« Reply #314 on: December 07, 2012, 01:29:26 am »
Good idea, Sue!  It's done, except I kept the wedding reference because of the poll at the top.  8)
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Offline Mandy21

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Dawn is coming,
Open your eyes...

Offline Katie77

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After
« Reply #316 on: December 07, 2012, 05:30:35 pm »
Sad news from England this morn:

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/12/07/15753452-nurse-at-duchess-kates-hospital-who-was-hoaxed-by-djs-found-dead?lite

As an Australian, I am deeply saddened and embarrassed that two of my countrymen, decided that a stupid prank would enhance their popularity on a radio show. While I am sure, they never imagined the tragedy that has now unfolded, it is a reminder to all members of the media, that while such antics may be common in their business, they are confronting and upsetting to the victims of this stupidity, and that just because they are members of the media, does not give them the right to cross the line of private and confidential.
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Offline Kelda

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After
« Reply #317 on: December 07, 2012, 06:46:13 pm »
What a shame :( I wonder if her bosses had given her a really hard time over this?
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Offline Katie77

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After
« Reply #318 on: December 07, 2012, 07:32:49 pm »
While I deplore the antics of the media, my suspicious mind once again towards the power of the Royal family, also makes me very cynical.

I cannot help thinking, that this news is just as peculiar and unexpected, as hearing about Princess Diana dying in a car accident.
Being happy doesn't mean everything is perfect.

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Offline brian

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Re: The Royal Wedding of William and Kate - And What Came After
« Reply #319 on: December 07, 2012, 08:43:30 pm »
While I deplore the antics of the media, my suspicious mind once again towards the power of the Royal family, also makes me very cynical.

I cannot help thinking, that this news is just as peculiar and unexpected, as hearing about Princess Diana dying in a car accident.
I am afraid I do not share your suspicious mind. I have the greatest regard for most of the Royal Family and the greatest dislike of most of the modern media.
I follow the activities of the royals , my admiration for the Queen is absolute but I do not want to know what they eat for breakfast. I never buy a magazine or newspaper to just read about them. All that was necessary and all that would have been covered when I was young was that the princess was expecting and was in hospital. Why on earth did the media need to camp outside for days. Hope they caught cold. I did not need to see a photo of her leaving hospital obviously still not feeling 100%.
I hope and pray all goes well and do not need to know anything further until the day of the birth.
I am glad the 2 radio idiots have been taken off air but guess it will not be for long.
I am very anti practical jokes since early in my teaching career when one group of students threw dried peas over the staff room floor and another put a mouse in a colleagues drawer. The result was an excellent but quite stout  female teacher of English was taken to hospital by ambulance, thankfully no lasting injuries.
I dreaded school muck up day for most of my career. Several jokes at my expense were very hurtful before I was able to come out and be openly gay yet the students did not realise how close to the truth they were.