Author Topic: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi  (Read 14401 times)

Offline Sophia

  • BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,574
  • Your elbows, try to lick them
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #20 on: April 09, 2015, 11:13:24 am »
Hmmmm, I'll have to check this out.

You absolutely should check it out. You won't be disappointed. You are up for lovely treat.

Offline CellarDweller

  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • ********
  • Posts: 32,941
  • A city boy's mentality, with a cowboy's soul.
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2015, 12:02:59 pm »
*makes mental note to check TV schedule when I get home*


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline bentgyro

  • Sr. Ranch Hand
  • ***
  • Posts: 140
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2015, 01:58:05 pm »
Love the things they do to make sure the dog is still alive.

Offline Sophia

  • BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,574
  • Your elbows, try to lick them
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #23 on: April 10, 2015, 06:55:51 am »
Love the things they do to make sure the dog is still alive.

The water spray must be Very pleasant.  :)

Offline CellarDweller

  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • ********
  • Posts: 32,941
  • A city boy's mentality, with a cowboy's soul.
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #24 on: April 10, 2015, 08:35:28 am »
Love the things they do to make sure the dog is still alive.

The water spray must be Very pleasant.  :)

Ok, now I have to see this!  LOL


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline CellarDweller

  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • ********
  • Posts: 32,941
  • A city boy's mentality, with a cowboy's soul.
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #25 on: April 10, 2015, 08:36:04 am »
-The show was originally titled "Vicious Old Queens", but this was thought of as too obscene and so was shortened to just "Vicious".

Just that title alone makes me want to laugh!


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Sophia

  • BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,574
  • Your elbows, try to lick them
Re: "Vicious": British comedy with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi
« Reply #26 on: April 10, 2015, 12:48:30 pm »
Just that title alone makes me want to laugh!

I'm sure after seeing this episode you are totally sold. Want more. Can't wait for season two to start. ( Unfortunately you haft wait to the summer. )
[youtube=425,350]http://youtu.be/dgUv9L8Yu0I[/youtube]


Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2015/06/ian-mckellen-is-going-to-wear-white-on-gay-pride.html

Ian McKellen
Is Going to
Wear White
at Gay Pride


By Carl Swanson
June 27, 2015 5:31 p.m.



Ian McKellen



On June 28th, Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi are two of the grand marshals the 2015 Gay Pride Parade (sharing that honor with the artist J. Christopher Neal and Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera, a Ugandan activist), on the weekend that the Supreme Court declared gay marriage a right in the United States. (See: this Vine they did to celebrate while wearing Stonewall Inn t-shirts, and playing Queen.) McKellen and Jacobi, both 76, play a gay couple on the PBS show “Vicious,” and have known each other since they were both Cambridge students, long before it was possible to be openly gay. McKellen was also in town to promote his film Mr. Holmes, in which he plays a mature Sherlock, no longer young.  We spoke to them on Saturday afternoon, as a rainstorm loomed over New York, presumably to be followed by a spectacularly inspiring rainbow.

Ian: I think we had three responsibilities as Grand Marshals, and one is have conversations like this with the media. The second was to attend the rally yesterday. And on Sunday we’ll be at the march. How are you doing Derek?

Derek: Hanging on by an eyelash.

I hope it’s not going to rain on the festivities tomorrow.

Ian: Is it raining?

Derek: It’s sort of raining now. I hope it gets it all over with before tomorrow.

It’s a tribute to you; Londony weather.

Ian: Don’t you be rude about London weather.

It’s a momentous weekend for gay people. Tell me about the changes you’ve seen in how gays have been treated in your lifetimes.

Ian: If you’re seventy-six years old, which Derek and I are, you’ve seen quite a bit of change. It was illegal to be gay in the UK when we were your age. We remember people going to prison for being gay. And to from that extreme to today, when there are now no laws which disadvantage gay people in the UK. But changing laws, that’s quite simple. You make your arguments, and when you are right about them, as we are, eventually people come around and people change. Of course, you are still left with the attitudes which underlie those laws. Still, there are people in the United States who will be feeling lonely and misunderstood in being gay. So the changes, they are person by person. That's a much longer process.

What was it like coming to New York, and being gay, years back?

Ian: I don’t know that this is true, but I have a distinct memory of, in 1967 when I filled out my visa form to come to the U.S. [to work on Broadway], I had to declare that I was not now nor ever had been gay. But you should check to see if that was true in 1967. Back then, you did not advertise your sexuality, and if you wanted to be open about it, you went to a private place. I remember going to the Tony Awards in 1981 with my boyfriend at the time, and someone coming up to me afterwards, privately, and thanking me for being open. That was in 1981!

Where did you go out in New York back then?

Ian: I went to a couple of gay bars and clubs, before the days of AIDS--that is when everything changed. But I don’t remember what they were called!

Coming out must have changed too.

Ian: Coming out is not a sudden process: being honest to yourself, about yourself; you come out to your best friend and your family and at work… it does take time. And if you are in the public eye, you have a further thing you do, talk about it in public.

And your talking about it makes young people see who they are, who they can be easier, don't you think? In some ways, they don’t have to come out, many of them, not in that way you think of it, in part because other people have, and because of films and TV, so they already know what they are: there are preexisting models for who they are.

Ian: The point of the laws changing is that we are all allowed  to be different. There is no one kind of gay person any more than there is one kind of straight person. We are what we are and who we are and we make a decision to talk about it or not.

Derek: I’ve never talked so much about being gay in my life as I have in the last two days! This conversation proves that I am bored with it. I’m going to get married with my other half with whom I’ve been for 38 years. But talking about it is boring.

You’re on a gay-rights press junket!

Ian: Yes, I’m in New York for the opening of a film and I'll be talking about it nonstop about myself anyway.

What is the most moving thing for you so far?

Ian: When Derek introduced his partner Richard to a crowd of strangers at the rally, and they cheered them to the skies. Not that they needed the affirmation.

Derek: I think tomorrow is going to be the high point. I’ve never been to a gay pride parade in my life. So I’m really starting at the top.

Why haven't you gone before in London?

Derek: I’m not sure. I'm often working or away...

Do you go, Ian?

Ian: Of course I do, I go. And if you happen to be in London and not working next year, Derek, I’m going to call you up and I'm sure you'll be delighted to go!

And what are you going to wear to the parade tomorrow?

Derek: [Laughs] I’m not quite sure yet but I think I’m going be vaguely in blue.

Ian: I will obviously be in white.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/27/theater/ian-mckellen-and-derek-jacobi-virgins-of-the-gay-pride-march.html



THEATER
Ian McKellen and
Derek Jacobi in a
Gay Pride March Debut


By DAVE ITZKOFF
JUNE 26, 2015



Ian McKellen, left, and Derek Jacobi, on the balcony of their Midtown hotel, will be grand marshals at
Sunday's Gay Pride March.




When Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi come sailing down Fifth Avenue in convertibles at the Gay Pride March on Sunday, they will not only be grand marshals at the annual event but also first-time attendees.

So on Thursday morning, these revered British actors, who appear together in the PBS sitcom “Vicious,” were wondering what awaited them beyond an afternoon of waving to fans and onlookers.

“I’m just a sponge for anything that might happen,” said Mr. Jacobi, the soft-spoken star of “I, Claudius” and countless stage productions.

Mr. McKellen, the “Lord of the Rings” and “X-Men” star, whose utterances are either deeply serious or extremely arch, opted for the second. “You may be in for a very, very happy weekend,” he replied.

On a visit to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in the West Village, these two performers, who are both 76 and are gay, had come for a quick education on New York’s Pride events and their significance to the city on a weekend following the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling on same-sex marriage. (At this year’s 46th parade, Mr. Jacobi and Mr. McKellen share grand marshal duties with the artist J. Christopher Neal and Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera, a Ugandan activist.)

Along the way, they revisited their personal histories and reflected on the progress they had seen in their often parallel lives.

Even if his and Mr. Jacobi’s principal goal in participating in the parade was simply to have “a lovely time,” Mr. McKellen said that their mere presence in it, as living links between a less progressive era and the present day, made a statement of its own.

“That’s what we’re doing by being here and waving,” he said. “We don’t have to be reading out a long list of demands.”

The two friends, who play a longtime gay couple on “Vicious,” first met as students at the University of Cambridge in the 1950s, where they bonded over their interests in acting, their working-class backgrounds and their sexuality.

“We knew we were both gay,” Mr. Jacobi said, “but we didn’t call it gay.” Euphemisms like “camp” and “queer” were the norm, they explained, at a time when homosexuality was still illegal in Britain.

Both men went on to illustrious stage and screen careers, to play Richard III and King Lear, and to receive knighthoods — “We’re pretty much the same person,” Mr. McKellen joked.

Unlike their industry forebears, who they said never acknowledged even to confidants that they were gay or bisexual, Mr. McKellen and Mr. Jacobi said actors of their generation could be open about their sexuality with friends and colleagues.

Yet Mr. McKellen did not come out publicly until 1988, at age 49, during a radio broadcast in which he and the conservative journalist Peregrine Worsthorne debated Britain’s so-called Section 28 legislation, which forbade authorities from “promoting homosexuality.”

As Mr. McKellen recalled it, “When he said something particularly nasty about gay people, I said I’m one of them myself.”

Mr. Jacobi, by his own reckoning, did not come out at all. “I kind of oozed out,” he said with a laugh.

While still in college, Mr. Jacobi said he told his mother he was gay, and her reaction was, “Oh, all boys go through this phase.”

Years later, Mr. Jacobi said: “I never made a point of stating: I am gay. I can’t explain why I didn’t do that. It wasn’t fear. It was just that, after a time, I assumed everybody knew.”

Today, the two men agree that Mr. McKellen, who is a member of gay advocacy and support groups like Stonewall U.K., is the far more vocal and political of their pairing.

On their visit to the L.G.B.T. center, Mr. McKellen kept its executive director, Glennda Testone, on her toes with a barrage of questions about its mission and funding.

When Ms. Testone said the center receives money from “every legal source you can imagine,” Mr. McKellen mischievously inquired: “Prostitution?”

“No,” Ms. Testone answered. “I said legal, remember.”

Mr. Jacobi, meanwhile, preferred to let his wide eyes do the talking after he was shown a Keith Haring mural teeming with imaginative depictions of male anatomy and its uses.

Asked what he thought of the artwork, Mr. Jacobi said, “I can’t quite speak yet.”

Gary Janetti, the writer and executive producer of “Vicious” (whose second season begins on Aug. 23), said in an interview that Mr. McKellen and Mr. Jacobi were embodiments of how the popular culture is important for gay people to learn about their peers and predecessors.

“You don’t learn gay history in school,” said Mr. Janetti, who has also produced comedies like “Will & Grace” and “Family Guy.”

“Until we actually have a textbook,” he continued, “we’re this subculture that has to pass down our history verbally.”

Beyond their professional accomplishments, Mr. Jacobi and Mr. McKellen have seen “extraordinary change take place in their lives,” Mr. Janetti said, and were gay at times that required “extraordinary courage.”

Mr. McKellen and Mr. Jacobi acknowledged that they have been criticized for their involvement in “Vicious,” which some reviewers have said offers a stereotypical depiction of a mincing, over-the-top gay couple.

“It’s an exaggeration of types,” Mr. McKellen said. “It’s not a social documentary.”

Even so, Mr. Jacobi said, “Vicious” was progressive in its own way, for being a rare sitcom to focus on gay men in their 70s.

“Ian asks the audience, every show, ‘At the top of those stairs, do you think they sleep in twin beds or a double bed?’ ” Mr. Jacobi said. “And 100 percent put their hands up for the double bed.”

After their visit to the L.G.B.T. center, Mr. McKellen and Mr. Jacobi were driven a few blocks south to the Stonewall Inn, the bar that is considered the birthplace of the American gay-rights movement.

Inside, they met a bartender who gave his name only as Tree, and who said that he was also 76 years old. When he turned 80, Tree said, it would coincide with the 50th anniversary of the riots that began there in June 1969.

“Then,” Mr. McKellen said to Tree, “they’re going to lay you out on the bar and lick you all over.”

Tree replied, “They don’t have to wait four years.”

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011
http://www.ew.com/article/2015/06/26/ian-mckellen-derek-jacobi-marriage-equality


NEWS | LGBT ENTERTAINMENT
Ian McKellen
and Derek Jacobi
celebrated marriage equality
by blasting Queen


BY JESSICA GOODMAN • @JESSGOOD
Posted June 26 2015 — 12:25 PM EDT





The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage on Friday, and while many stars celebrated online, no one reacted quite like Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi.

In Vine videos posted to BuzzFeed’s accounts, the duo – who are also acting as this year’s NYC Gay Pride grand marshals – celebrated with Stonewall Inn t-shirts, confetti and a faux marriage proposal, all while blasting Queen’s “We Are The Champions.” The most appropriate!

Click on:
http://www.ew.com/article/2015/06/26/ian-mckellen-derek-jacobi-marriage-equality
to see!


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"