Author Topic: London Spy: Ben Whishaw, dreamy lover/genius Ed Holcroft and sage Jim Broadbent  (Read 183195 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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THECRUCIBLEINTERVIEWBEN WHISHAW


http://www.wmagazine.com/culture/2016/03/ben-whishaw-john-proctor-the-crucible-broadway/photos/

Ben Whishaw is Ferocious
on Broadway's Buzzy The Crucible
In a breakthrough Broadway performance as John Proctor in Arthur Miller's The Crucible
the chameleonic British actor may finally earn the recognition he's long deserved.


by Vanessa Lawrence
March 23, 2016 7:00 AM





Saoirse Ronan and Ben Whishaw in The Crucible. Photos by Jan Versweyveld


If you don’t immediately recognize Ben Whishaw, that’s probably because the 35-year old British actor has made a career of disappearing, with extraordinary grace and nuance, into a never-ending range of roles. Since his lauded professional debut, straight out of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, as the lead in a 2004 West End production of Hamlet [SORRY, DUH, WRONG! IT WAS NOT IN THE WEST END, IT WAS IN THE OLD VIC, WHICH IS IN SOUTHWARK! JG] Whishaw has appeared onscreen as a serial killer (2006′s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer), the poet John Keats (2009′s Bright Star), the tech wiz Q (in two James Bond films), and has even given voice to Paddington Bear.

Now, he is lending his gangly frame and quiet, brooding ferocity to Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, opening next week on Broadway at the Walter Kerr Theatre. Whishaw stars as John Proctor, the good-hearted farmer whose affair with his former maid, Abigail Williams (Saoirse Ronan), not only threatens the sanctity of his marriage to his wife Elizabeth (Sophie Okonedo) but sets into motion a witch hunt that devastates the community in 17th century Salem, Massachusetts. In the hands of buzzy Belgian director Ivo van Hove, it is less an historical retelling and more a tale of the perils of plummeting into a world so stricken by fear and xenophobia that it can’t see the gray for the black and white. (Sound familiar?) Whishaw, whose performance may finally get him some much overdue recognition, talks about countering stereotypical casting, playing a hero and holding onto the freedom of youth.




John Proctor is an iconic stage character. How would you describe your interpretation of him?

It was really important to me to find the character in myself. And that was something [director] Ivo [van Hove] was really keen on, because I’m obviously not the classic casting—physically, and just generally. I think [John Proctor] is a very conflicted person, and a flawed person in a way that we all are, but fundamentally really good. And I love that. I think sometimes he’s played more like this big hero, and he’s an ordinary guy who has done what he thinks is quite a small thing: he slept with the maid once and it horrified him that he did it. He’s poured his heart out to his wife, he’s trying to make her happy, he thinks it’s done and dusted. And then this small incident is the seed of what becomes this horrific witch hunt which destroys an entire community. So our work with Ivo was to make that the journey from something domestic, private, petty, even—as he said, the single error of his life, he’s never done anything else wrong ever, he’s a good Christian man—to something where suddenly he’s at the center of a whole larger problem.



Do you consider him an antihero?

I don’t really like those terms, but I suppose he falls more into that than into the hero. But maybe by the end he’s sort of become a hero again, somehow. I think maybe there’s no such thing as heroes; there are heroic actions. And his action at the end is kind of heroic; or a noble thing. “I’m not going to let you do this. I will die.” Because otherwise, he’s propping up all the madness, the whole fraud of the thing. He has to die for the truth and for humanity, in a way.



John Proctor is stereotypically played as physically larger, a more hulking presence. You lend him a sense of vulnerability. You mentioned not being “classic casting”: how do you feel about that? Do you think the theater world is opening up to more diverse depictions of canonic roles?

I hope so. I was talking to Sophie Okonedo [who plays John Proctor’s wife] about this. We were both saying how frightened we had been to approach the roles because we knew that neither of us was really classic casting. But then at a certain point we realized that’s why we wanted to do it, and why it’s interesting for us. Sometimes it can be wonderful to see an actor do something that they’re obviously well suited for. But also I find you go, as an audience member:”Well I kind of know in advance what that is.” Or, as an actor, you think, “I know this, I know what to do with this, I’ve done this before.” But the excitement and the frightening thing was to go, “I don’t know what to do with this, and I don’t know whether I can do it.” That’s much more interesting, really. And Sophie and I both agreed that it’s been really good for us both.






Sophie Okonedo and Ben Whishaw in The Crucible. Photo by Jan Versweyveld.


Given that, did you ever think you would be playing John Proctor on Broadway?

Weirdly, I have played this part before. I did play it at school when I was 15 in high school [in Bedfordshire, England]. But it was such a long time ago. But no, I didn’t think I’d ever do it. But then I never really think I’ll be doing anything. I’m always surprised by what comes my way, really.



So what was your 15 year-old John Proctor like?

I can’t really remember. I have no real recollection of it other than that I really loved the play. And I remember feeling like I really got it. In a way, it does speak to teenagers, this play, because it is about this system that is forcing people to conform to something. So somehow I remember it speaking to me quite strongly. I’m sure, though, there’s lots that I didn’t really understand about marriage and love and stuff like that, which becomes so central to how we interpret it.



It’s amazing, this play was written as a reaction to McCarthyism, but you watch it now and the contemporary resonance it has is so chilling. Do you feel its present day impact as you work through it?

I can feel it from the audience. I can feel that it feels very much like this is about now. And as you say, there’s something chilling: this could and does and possibly is happening now in places in America, but also everywhere. Obviously he wrote it about a very specific situation that he was experiencing, but the specificity of that and the specificity of his feelings make it very universal. It really could be anywhere in the world, so many horrific things that have happened in the world have probably begun in a similar way: small seeds that take on horrific power and become tragic.



That said, do you think your being British gives you a different perspective on this very American play?

Possibly. It’s weird, we rehearsed the play with American accents, me and Sophie [who is also British]. And then a few previews in, Ivo asked us to try it with our own voices. And we liked it more, so we kept it. We were planning on sounding American, but we’re not now. We just felt like the production is not specific about where we are in time or in space. We felt more comfortable, immediately. We dropped the American accents [and] we felt like we’d been married for a long time. We’re more connected to ourselves, I suppose, which is really Ivo’s thing. He’s not really interested in naturalism. Which is so unusual, I’ve never worked with a director quite so uninterested in it—like it doesn’t matter. He just says, “Play the situation.” So it’s very stripped away of all of that. It’s more important that it’s a group of people who are somehow trying to survive in this wilderness, in this new country.



You’ve had such an enormous range of roles: most people wouldn’t think the same actor who played Ariel in The Tempest would also be playing John Proctor in The Crucible. Do you have any sense of what accounts for your ability to be so changeable?

I don’t see myself as a type, I suppose, that’s the thing. I don’t put myself in any kind of category and I really dislike anything like that coming at me. Because when I was 15, I played John Proctor and nobody thought I shouldn’t, or couldn’t, do it. There’s a freedom you have as a young person before the world starts branding you as something that I’m always trying to keep hold of. Because that’s how I feel inside: I’m many things. But also I think it’s that acting is not really so much about transforming or changing, but more of a chemical process, if you like, of your personality with the character. It’s not like you suddenly become a completely other human. You’re only ever you. And it’s coming out from you somewhere, but with the meeting of this other material that you’re working with.



You’re in the movie A Hologram for the King, based on the Dave Eggers book, coming out this spring. Can you tell me about your role in that?

Oh god, it’s almost a joke that I’m even credited in that. I love Tom Tykwer, who’s the director, and with whom I’ve worked a few times. And I always said I’ll do anything in your films and he’s taken my word and put me in everything, but sometimes just for like half a second. I play the hologram. So I appear for about 30 seconds at the end of the film.



You’re playing a hologram. That’s no small thing.

It’s not a small thing because the film is called A Hologram. But it might be disappointing if you were expecting something more.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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THECRUCIBLEINTERVIEWBEN WHISHAW


http://www.wmagazine.com/culture/2016/03/ben-whishaw-john-proctor-the-crucible-broadway/photos/


That said, do you think your being British gives you a different perspective on this very American play?

Possibly. It’s weird, we rehearsed the play with American accents, me and Sophie [who is also British]. And then a few previews in, Ivo asked us to try it with our own voices. And we liked it more, so we kept it. We were planning on sounding American, but we’re not now. We just felt like the production is not specific about where we are in time or in space. We felt more comfortable, immediately. We dropped the American accents [and] we felt like we’d been married for a long time. We’re more connected to ourselves, I suppose, which is really Ivo’s thing. He’s not really interested in naturalism. Which is so unusual, I’ve never worked with a director quite so uninterested in it—like it doesn’t matter. He just says, “Play the situation.” So it’s very stripped away of all of that. It’s more important that it’s a group of people who are somehow trying to survive in this wilderness, in this new country.



Sigh. Such a mistake. I saw it the night of the first preview, and [with Ben's and Sophie's American accents] it was amazing. Powerful. A week later, I saw it a second time--sigh. Such a missed opportunity.

Weirdly--Ivo van Hove did not ask Saoirse Ronan change her voice back to an Irish accent (her own), but let her keep her (credible) American accent (as did most of the remaining cast). Sigh.

I still may go back to see the production for a third time. Maybe.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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HA!!!!

WHO looks uncannily like--



No?? Talk about doppelgängers!   :D

The person on the left we know.  ::)

The person on the right is: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Meynell

Hugo Meynell (June 1735 – 14 December 1808) is generally seen as the father of modern fox hunting, became Master of Fox Hounds for the Quorn Hunt in Leicestershire in 1753 and continued in that role for another forty-seven years (the hunt is so called after Meynell's home, Quorn Hall in Quorndon, North Leicestershire).

(Portrait by Hugo Meynell on the right by John Hoppner c. 1789 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hoppner )

 :)
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline CellarDweller

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  • A city boy's mentality, with a cowboy's soul.
(Does this sound like some people we know?)  ::) :laugh:

No comment.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYDIRECTORJAKOB_VERBRUGGEN
From:
Flanders Image
#25 Spring 2013



Five part series broadcast on Mondays at 9pm on BBC 2.

Text by Ian Mundell
Portrait by Bart Dewaele




Jakob Verbruggen jokes that he owes his chance to direct BBC television series The Fall to the the Danes and the Swedes.  ‘I have to thank The Killing and the Scandinavians’, he says. What he means is that the British television industry is opening up.

'There is an interest in the European way of filmmaking,' he explains. 'The Americans like European directors for their big genre films, because they have a fresh approach, and I think that the British, inspired by a constant stream of successful Scandinavian series such as The Killing and Borgen, are trying to refresh their television drama. They want a fresh look, a fresh visual style and I think that's why they got me on board.' On a practical level, the connection came through Code 37. Verbruggen was one of the principle directors on this Flemish television series and went on to direct a successful spin-off feature film, Code 37 The Movie. When British production company Artists Studio picked up remake rights for the series, they asked Verbruggen to read the script of The Fall. 'It was a surprise that they called me, but I'm happy that they did,' he says.








Different atmosphere
After graduating from the RITS film school in Brussels in 2002, Verbruggen was initially taken on as an assistant director and eventually directed two episodes of the crime series Missing Persons Unit (Vermist). He went on to work for production company Menuet which launched Code 37. This series featured police inspector Hannah Maes, who takes over the vice squad of the Ghent police force. At the same time she investigates a violent crime in her family's own history. Verbruggen's idea for giving this series a different atmosphere was to borrow elements from the western genre. 'It's in the set design, the way the actors look with their western boots and the way they carry their guns,' he explains. The Fall also centres on a tough female cop. Police inspector Stella Gibson (Gillian Anderson of X-Files) is brought from London to Belfast to review a murder investigation. When she finds other unsolved murders are connected to the case, she becomes convinced that a serial killer is at work. In parallel, we see the serial killer going about his everyday life.



Voyeur
Verbruggen’s approach to The Fall also has some distinct influences. One was to draw on documentary techniques, using a casual, hand-held style of camerawork. 'That brings the audience closer to the story of the police investigator and creates a heightened reality for the personal world of the serial killer,' he explains. At the same time he wanted to generate a sense of mystery around the characters. 'It's not a whodunit or whydunit, it's whether or not the killer is going to get away with murder,' he says. That means giving viewers time to get to know both the killer and Stella Gibson. ‘The killer in The Fall is a voyeur and so we tried to make the audience as much of voyeur as possible.' This meant deploying a range of camera techniques, from hand-held and steady cam to cranes and long tracking shots. Being able to do this was one of the advantages of working on a series for the BBC. 'Filming is the same everywhere and there is never enough time, but here you could feel there was a bit more budget,' Verbruggen says.

This was also apparent in the number of people involved, for instance on production design. 'There are more people in the art department,' Verbruggen says. 'I thought: poor Belgian art directors! They work their asses off, and they're very good, but they have to do it with three people, or five on a feature film. Here there were at least twice as many people involved.' But with more money comes more responsibility, and Verbruggen was struck by the way in which the writer, producers and the broadcaster were closely involved in taking decisions about shooting the series. 'It's not that I was restricted, but I could feel that every step was being watched. I had to prove myself, which was challenging, sometimes tiring, but also very interesting.'



Experience
Being able to work closely with the writer, Allan Cubitt (renowned for his work on the Prime Suspect series), was very rewarding. 'There are good scripts in Belgium, but if you read a BBC script you can feel the experience the writers have in telling a story and helping directors visually,' Verbruggen says. And there was something special about working with Gillian Anderson who is more than just a famous face from the X-Files. 'She has 10 TV series and 10-20 films more experience than I have, so I had to be very focused and make sure I did my homework.' Similarly it was necessary to let Anderson explore the limits of her character. 'If things were difficult or she was not happy with takes, then I could make a contribution,' he says. Nothing beats the feeling when that pays off in a scene. 'You see it from behind the monitor and you think: yes, that's why you're a star! It all comes down to good understanding and teamwork.'








Future
In the immediate future Verbruggen plans to take a well-earned holiday. I've been working non-stop for two years,' he says. 'It's a good moment to take a little break and reset my mind.' He still dreams of making an original feature film, for which Code 37 The Movie is a good first step. Beyond that he is open to offers for more TV work. 'I haven't been spoiled by the experience of working on The Fall. If there is a good project, I'm happy to come back and work in Belgium. But we'll see what the UK adventure brings.'





Based on an interview with Jakob Verbruggen, director of BBC series 'The Fall' published in ‘Flanders Image’, May 2013


Embassy of Belgium in the United Kingdom








"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYDIRECTORJAKOB_VERBRUGGEN/2013THEFALL

From July 2013:



Jakob Verbruggen has had a career in series television, where directing is generally less important than writing, or creating. But The Fall is most thoroughly directed. The essential naturalism of the photography, and the meager use of music, are offset by a camera style that can be highly inventive.





https://newrepublic.com/article/113713/fall-bbc-and-netflix-reviewed-david-thomson

The Fall
The BBC's Latest Import is Modern, Chilling, and Groundbreaking


by DAVID THOMSON
July 2, 2013




We could be forgiven for thinking that The Fall is a police procedural story in a hallowed BBC tradition. The show is created and written by Allan Cubitt, who did the second season of Prime Suspect, the famous Helen Mirren TV vehicle in which she plays a British detective. A top cop, a woman, is brought in from London to help out with what appears to be a serial killer in Belfast. Haven’t we been here before? Don’t we know this game and enjoy the sport of “Find the killer”?

Two things disturb that preconception. Within minutes of the story starting, we know who the killer is; we watch him at work, with fascination, if not quite fondness. Secondly, the cop has none of the gritty feminist bitterness of Mirren’s Jane Tennyson. Instead, Gillian Anderson makes Detective Superintendent Stella Gibson one of the most beautiful women you’ll find on television. This is not simply Ms. Anderson. It’s the way she has been presented—long blonde hair, silk blouses with buttons that come undone, and a superior officer’s authority that quickly picks a handsome junior cop, gives him her hotel room number, and expects him to service her between 2 and 4:30 in the morning. Of course, he does as he’s told. As Stella has sex, the killer is at work. Who’s falling?

So, if we know so much so soon, how does this self-spoiling mini-series (five episodes, 300 minutes total) manage to be so compelling? In Britain, last month, it had record-breaking viewing figures, and in this country, Netflix moved in and bought the show for streaming. (While a certain kind of BBC product—“Masterpiece Theatre,” for example—was natural fodder for PBS, the network might be increasingly shut out by new technology and arrangements.) Why is it so compelling?



ICE QUEEN
Detective Superintendent Stella Gibson might be colder than the killer she's tracking.
BBC Images



I think it’s because this show is breaking ground; Gillian Anderson said as much in a promotional interview. It’s what made her want to do it. There is a secret similarity between Stella and Paul Spector, the killer. It begins in habits: They are both athletic—he runs; she swims. They are loners and intellectuals; their belief in intelligence is what makes them unreachable and unknowable. They both cherish the ritual of preparation. When we first see Stella, getting ready to go to Belfast, she removes a covering of nocturnal face cleanser. It’s like the way Paul works behind a mask.

Neither of them ever asks the show for sympathy. (We are far from the time where killers, like Peter Lorre in M, break down begging for understanding.) The unspoken bond is that of so many mystery stories: The detective has to learn to think like the killer; the killer is playing a game in which the investigator is the natural partner. The two figures share a terrible knowledge of the world. All alone in her flat, Stella could be the next victim, or another killer. It’s not that anyone is a suspect, prime or otherwise; it’s a matter of what it is in human nature we should suspect.

The structure and direction of the show works on this principle. The actions of the two leading characters are cut together. Very often, in close-up, they seem to be looking at each other. Moreover, Paul’s targets are attractive, educated, professional women living alone—they are the court of which Gillian Anderson’s cop is queen. Except that she is the loveliest of them all. And while it may not be sufficiently realistic or plausible, Anderson’s look is as vital to the show as the provocative loveliness of Grace Kelly, Janet Leigh, or Tippi Hedren in a Hitchcock film. There are moments in the series where an attentive viewer will develop the feeling that Stella’s courage or recklessness is deliberately putting her own life at stake. Isn’t she the ultimate victim that Paul might imagine?

Allan Cubitt has written all five episodes and Jakob Verbruggen has directed them. Verbruggen has had a career in series television, where directing is generally less important than writing, or creating. But “The Fall” is most thoroughly directed. The essential naturalism of the photography, and the meager use of music, are offset by a camera style that can be highly inventive. So Paul’s house (shared with a wife and two children) has roaming top shots that track over the rooms as if they were sets or cubicles in a doll’s house. (It may remind you of similar shooting at the violent conclusion of Scorsese’s Taxi Driver, where the flourish or rhetoric is reaching out for fable or theater.

One of the best things about The Fall is that Paul is not an outcast or a trembling psychopath: He is a Dad with two children who adore him; happily married and having pleasurable sex with his wife. He is a grief counselor by profession. As you think about it, that’s another way of describing a cop. But Stella has no family, no back story, no support—except for the cop she calls in for sex. Not that she has any notion of falling in love with this guy. No rescue or happiness could convince Stella. She has to go on hunting killers, just as Paul has to go on providing her with material.

I won’t say more about the narrative, except to suggest that the enormous, stealthy expectations of the first three episodes are not quite fulfilled. I think the BBC elected to allow some mercy at the end. Fair enough, we need that, especially after so absorbing a set-up. By the end, the killer has passed the cop, and for all the iconic glory of Gillian Anderson (lovingly photographed by Ruairi O’Brien), Jamie Dornan as Paul has become the center of the drama in a performance that unpeels as slowly as a stripper—and maybe as seductively. The show has remarkable support: Bronagh Waugh as Paul’s wife; Niamh McGrady as an assistant cop who desires the boss; John Lynch as a superior, and compromised policeman; Archie Panjabi as the pathologist, and a series of young actresses as the victims, above all Valene Kane. The killings are not neglected in the showing, though the direct violence is not stressed. Instead, the filming draws us into the ritualistic satisfaction that Paul feels. I can’t think of a film that gazes on its corpses with such chilled awe.

Finally, you’ll wonder why The Fall? What does the title mean? I don’t have a settled answer, though I think the question is what keeps us watching. Perhaps everyone falls, including us. For this is a work of great art that asks us a profound question in the treatment of murder—why are we watching; what do we want? My only uneasy answer is that I watched all five episodes in one sitting.











"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYDIRECTORJAKOB_VERBRUGGEN/2011CODE 37_THE FILM

From November 2011:









http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1757710/
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1757710/reviews?ref_=tt_urv

"Code 37 is better known from its TV-series than from this film. Set as usual in the Belgian-Flemish city of Ghent, it provides reasonable crime-entertainment that keeps you watching throughout. The more so while its crime-plot is sexually charged, another trade-mark of the series.

"Above all, this film Code 37 is very Belgian. Which means that its well-built story develops a little slower than you may be used to. And not as spectacular as you may expect. Code 37 deliberately emphasizes on normal, pretty recognizable people, doing their routine in everyday's circumstances."

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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John, dear John, you are such a font of London Spy wonderfulness!  Thank you for all this!

I love my Amazon-bound-up London Spy.  I couldn't wait for the dvd.  

I need to re-watch it in a marathon soon.



Once again, thanks, Paul.
In the meanwhile, FYI:



Quote
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4108134/board/nest/252940542?ref_=tt_bd_4
Re: BBC America version edited?
by iainhammer » Tue Feb 9 2016 02:13:25  
IMDb member since June 2000


Get the show from Amazon streaming - inexpensive, and every episode uncut, all the 'adult' language un-beeped, all the nudity unfogged (what a tender and moving m-2-m sex scene in episode one! Wow!) And uninfected by relentless commercials, which would be anathema to LS's carefully developed sense of dread and anxiety. Someone on this board claims episode one on BBCAmerica was '1 hr 15mins', but clearly doesn't understand that BBC UK is commercial-free and BBCAmerica is quite the opposite - BBCAmerica *ruins* British shows by means of censorship, as if we're all infants who need protecting. With Amazon, you pay your money - and receive the first season, in hi-def, for $13.99 - and you have it in your streaming library permanently. What a great show, sexy, compelling, Ben Whishaw giving an absolutely stunning performance.



BUT ALSO:



London Spy
Episode 1
"Lullaby"



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeda_Lullaby
Takeda Lullaby
(Japanese: 竹田の子守唄 or Takeda no komoriuta)
is a popular Japanese cradle song. It originated in Takeda, Fushimi, Kyoto.


This song has long been sung among the people in the burakumin areas of Kyoto and Osaka in a slightly different form for a long time. During the 1960s, it was picked up as a theme song by the Buraku Liberation League, particularly its branch at Takeda.



(Strange note: for some reason--probably MONEY--the BBC America/AND the Amazon Streaming versions have BOTH removed the vocal track of the Takeda Lullaby during the scene in the club--you can only hear it during the final credits. I realized that the vocal track was missing when I found it in a youtube clip posted before the BBC America premiere--that original British clip has since been deleted. JG)



I will be VERY INTERESTED to see if that vocal track of Takeda Lullaby is put back within that Drury Club scene or not--and maybe other tracks/scenes as well?

 :-\
« Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 08:52:52 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYDIRECTORJAKOB_VERBRUGGEN/2013THEFALL

From July 2013:



Jakob Verbruggen has had a career in series television, where directing is generally less important than writing, or creating. But The Fall is most thoroughly directed. The essential naturalism of the photography, and the meager use of music, are offset by a camera style that can be highly inventive.








[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LruwobnfAcA[/youtube]
Published on May 15, 2013



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKgLmnGXyJs[/youtube]
Published on May 22, 2013



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1juk93xWP0s[/youtube]
Published on May 24, 2013


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYDIRECTORJAKOB_VERBRUGGEN/2013THEFALL

From July 2013:


Two things disturb that preconception. Within minutes of the story starting, we know who the killer is; we watch him at work, with fascination, if not quite fondness. Secondly, the cop has none of the gritty feminist bitterness of Mirren’s Jane Tennyson. Instead, Gillian Anderson makes Detective Superintendent Stella Gibson one of the most beautiful women you’ll find on television. This is not simply Ms. Anderson. It’s the way she has been presented—long blonde hair, silk blouses with buttons that come undone, and a superior officer’s authority that quickly picks a handsome junior cop, gives him her hotel room number, and expects him to service her between 2 and 4:30 in the morning. Of course, he does as he’s told. As Stella has sex, the killer is at work. Who’s falling?



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qz7R5rooAbw[/youtube]
Published on Jun 5, 2013



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT2Tf_DcjFo[/youtube]
Published on Jan 6, 2014



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oj34pncJW9A[/youtube]
Published on Oct 10, 2012
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"