Author Topic: London Spy: Ben Whishaw, dreamy lover/genius Ed Holcroft and sage Jim Broadbent  (Read 167902 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYFANARTJO
http://j000000.tumblr.com

These boys need some
flower on their heads ; D
10th April 2016




Just the thing, Jo!
CLEARLY referencing
by the way:


LONDONSPYFANART_SAM (18)_AND
                                                                                                                 LONDONSPYFANART_BREEANA (18)



Two great minds had the same idea--one with for Danny and a series of different floral crowns for Alex--


http://persephoneggsy.tumblr.com/post/116541664328/i-am-such-trash-for-edward-holcroft-its-not-even



AND ALSO:



LONDONSPYFANARTJO
http://j000000.tumblr.com
http://j000000.tumblr.com/image/140334752061


2nd March 2016

Greek mythology AU! Dionysus! Danny and young prince Alex : D

Working on my fix-it comic is so tiring and somehow my head comes out with this when I found out that Ben was in theatre play playing Dionysus. And Ed [Holcroft] is just looks like a beautiful greek sculpture.
 WOOF!! I AGREE!!


So the AIU goes: Dionysus met Alex when he wanderers the earth and told him that his name is Danny and lured him into the wood using his wine or grape and so on…

I’ll just leave it here and get back to work. o<-<

http://j000000.tumblr.com
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYFANARTJO
http://j000000.tumblr.com

10th April 2016

Meanwhile, things
are getting serious!!






Series 2 by Jo--
I can't wait!


« Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 08:22:29 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The Sense of an Ending (2017)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4827986/


Writing
Julian Barnes               (novel)
Nick Payne                  (adaptation)
Nick Payne                  (screenplay)




Directed by
Ritesh Batra   



Cast
Jim Broadbent             Tony Webster
Billy Howle                  Young Tony

Charlotte Rampling       Veronica Ford
Freya Mavor                 Young Veronica

Joe Alwyn                    Adrian Finn

Edward Holcroft           Jack Ford

Harriet Walter              Margaret
Michelle Dockery          Susie   

Nick Mohammed          Danny
Timothy Innes             Young Alex
   




http://www.interviewmagazine.com/culture/edward-holcroft



CULTURE
SPY GAMES
EDWARD HOLCROFT
IN LONDON JANUARY 2016
By HALEY WEISS
Photography HANS NEUMANN
Published 02/04/16




(EXCERPT)

(....)

WEISS: You were able to work with Charlotte Rampling and Jim Broadbent again in
The Sense of an Ending.
Was filming more comfortable having known them from London Spy?

HOLCROFT: No, it was terrible.
[He is joking. See full interview posted above, page 9 http://bettermost.net/forum/index.php/topic,53215.msg674758.html#msg674758 ]

WEISS: Everything is terrible.

HOLCROFT: Everything is terrible! [laughs] I didn't actually have much to do with them in The Sense of an Ending. I know that they're in it, but my scenes weren't with them. But I did see Jim. Charlotte and Jim are kind of brilliant examples of not only very talented actors, but just such nice people. I can't begin to tell you. They're so unfazed by the industry side of it, they don't really have time for it, which is such an admirable quality when people are really talented. They don't buy in to some of the bullshit that comes with it. They have very quiet lives and they're great.

WEISS: I read that you think it's important to maintain a certain air of mystery as an actor. Can you tell me a little bit about that?

HOLCROFT: I don't think it's a new concept. I should think most actors probably think this, but I know that when I watch actors, the actors who I know least about I buy into more because I can imagine them as the character. It's as simple as that. If you lead a very high profile life—and of course, it's easy to say this, and if you become incredibly famous because of your work some of that is unavoidable—but if you can do as much as you can to keep away from some of that limelight then you just help yourself when it comes to your work. You have a blank canvas, as it were, to work with, rather than people knowing a whole bunch about your life or what you get up to, what you had for breakfast. Everyone is different, and each to their own, as they say, but for me that's what I would like to try and establish.

(....)




THE FIRST IMAGE FROM:
The Sense of an Ending (2017)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4827986/



Charlotte Rampling as Veronica Ford and Jim Broadbent as Tony Webster

« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 10:45:54 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The Sense of an Ending (2017)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4827986/

Cast
Jim Broadbent as Tony Webster      Billy Howle as Young Tony
« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 10:42:34 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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GLUE_E4TV_2014_JAMES_AND_CAL


 :o :o :o :o

Omg, CAN I STAND yet ANOTHER 5 (well, ok, 8 )-part British mini-series starring two Sensitive and Intelligent Boys without one of them getting KILLED in the FIRST FUCKING EPISODE and the remaining episodes trying to Solve the Mystery???

Especially as the Dead Boy left the Live Boy a Meaningful Charm on a Chain to wear on his neck??

It's in the pretty but gritty Berkshire countryside instead of imposing but gritty London town, but whatever!!

"He really did. He really loved me."

AUGH!! SHOOT ME NOW!!!!


It is the 2014 British (E4) TV mini-series called
'GLUE'
It was created and written by Jack Thorne
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glue_(TV_series)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3868832/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Thorne_(writer)


with Billy Howle as James and Tommy Knight as Cal--and Cal is mysteriously killed.

The SURVIVING boy is the same Billy Howle who, in 2016, will play Young Tony,
the younger/earlier self of Jim Broadbent (who is/will be the present day Tony Webster) in
Julian Barnes's The Sense of an Ending.


Billy Howle as James in Glue


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glue_(TV_series)
Reception
Digital Spy described Glue as being "unmissable TV" and also said "this is a whodunnit that will blow your mind". The Independent positively stated that Glue exposes the 'rotting despair of the countryside.'[4]

It premiered in Australia on 7 July 2015 on SBS2.[5]





Tommy Knight as Cal (left) and                                                             Billy Howle as James (right) in Glue





« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 08:43:38 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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GLUE_E4TV_2014_JAMES_AND_CAL




Tommy Knight as Cal (left) and                                                             Billy Howle as James (right) in Glue


http://peek-a-dillo.tumblr.com/post/102869046178/james-billy-howle-and-cal-tommy-knight-from
http://wednesdaydreams.tumblr.com/post/100053148015/you-dont-understand-all-ive-ever-wanted-was?soc_src=mail&soc_trk=ma

WEDNESDAYDREAMS
17 NOVEMBER 2014


You don’t understand. All I’ve ever wanted was you.



« Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 08:24:08 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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GLUE_E4TV_2014_JAMES_AND_CAL


You don’t understand. All I’ve ever wanted was you.

Tommy Knight as Cal (left) and                                                             Billy Howle as James (right) in Glue





[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDgFFGh9SUs&nohtml5=False[/youtube]
From the TV Mini-Series Glue James/Cal, Waiting: Music by Alice Boman
Published on Mar 8, 2015





[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpHWyXq7uCQ[/youtube]
cal&james | i found love
"I miss you more than I thought I would" Music: 'I Found Love' by Amber Run
Published on Feb 21, 2015


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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GLUE_E4TV_2014_JAMES_AND_CAL


Tommy Knight as Cal (left) and                                                             Billy Howle as James (right) in Glue




http://www.channel4.com/info/press/news/an-interview-with-billy-howle-for-glue

From E4 in Britain

An interview with
Billy Howle
for Glue


03 SEP 2014



Billy Howle plays James Warwick


What is Glue, what we can expect?
It’s daring in the sense that it’s a first. It’s a youth-orientated murder mystery in a rural setting. Murder mysteries are something that we tend to think of for an older demographic and this is the first time, I think, that you have a more youthful vibe. It’s quite playful. And it’s about a bunch of kids who are kind of isolated in this village and obviously are quite bored. I wouldn’t go as far as to say they are juvenile delinquents but they like to play games and have a laugh. Then things take a turn for the worse and it essentially becomes a ‘whodunit’. It’s about their relationships and how they change as a result of the murder.

Who is it that you play?
I play a character called James who is part of this group of six friends, and James lives and works on a farm with his Mum. The best way that I can describe him in a few words is he is quite the poet – he is very sensitive and he is a fairly intelligent chap and he is in this sort of moral dilemma in that he knows that he has a moral obligation to his Mum and his job on the farm, but he also wants to spread his wings a bit and take flight and become a young person in his own right.

How much did you know about the backstory of your character?
It’s an incredibly eclectic group of friends and they are all very different in their approach to life as well as personalities. In an ideal world – and also in [creator/writer] Jack [Thorne]’s writing – James fits a sort of James-shaped hole in that group. I think they bounce off each other incredibly well. Each character brings something incredibly new and fresh with regards to this group dynamic. It’s a reflection on any group of friends. If you hang around with people that are very similar to you can imagine that life would be pretty dull. I think that people need or crave that level of diversity within in their friendship groups as it’s challenging, and it’s always good to have your perceptions of the world challenged.

What did you think when you first time that you read the script?
It’s quite interesting because the way that we did it, we were kind of fed bit and bobs as we went, so I never got a whole narrative arc to begin with. I learnt stuff as I went along. That was really interesting and the first time I have done that so I got to learn a lot and explore. The script when I first read it, I thought that Jack has this incredible ability to balance tragedy and comedy elements. I think that he does that really well and has captured the poetry of the landscape in Berkshire. It’s a very dramatic landscape. It jumped off the page for me, and I really understood the mentality of the people that live there – isolated and rural communities.

The countryside is an integral part of the drama. Would you say it was an extra character?
I would say definitely. It plays a role in its own right and because the geography of Berkshire is so diverse, that really adds to the eclectic mish-mash of people who find themselves living together in a village. It has resonance. It also informs decision that we make. I know this because I come from a smallish town – Scarborough – and I think that does inform your decisions. When you are isolated, confined, for a lengthy period of time, you can go one of two ways and get comfortable - or want to get out of there as quick as you can. The setting of Glue captures that notion incredibly well.

What was it like working with the horses/animals?
It was pretty hands-on. I had to get my hands dirty. I had been to petting zoos and a child – and had ridden horses – but there were a few things that we did regarding animals that were very challenging. It was a necessary evil. I’m making it sound mysterious. Parts of it made me want to be vegetarian again.

The trailer has been playing out for the past few weeks, how does it feel to be part of E4’s big new show?
It’s sort of mind-blowing. Part of me is like sort of kind of ignoring it because it’s not configuring in my head. It’s incredibly exciting. I’m really excited and incredibly optimistic for the show.

Are you a fan of crime drama?
I love a good murder mystery. It has been imbued in me since I was a kid as my Gran used to watch Poirot. Agatha Christie that sort of ilk. I love it. We all have a morbid fascination with death – particularly murder. I loved Vera – which I also did an episode for –as I love Brenda Blethyn and her level of subtly. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vera_(TV_series))

Can you tell us a secret?
My lips are sealed. I think that’s the nature of secrets.

If you could sum up Glue – what is it that you think will connect with audiences?
It’s the rites of passage for young people who feel trapped or isolated in any way. Glue is spot on with regards to that. I think that is something that people will relate to.

ENDS.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 07:19:18 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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GLUE_E4TV_2014_TRAILERS


From E4 in Britain




[youtube=425,350]
[/youtube]
New British Drama: Glue | This September | E4
Published on Aug 4, 2014




Overton. A tiny village in the English countryside. Farming is its bread-and-butter. Race-horses are its beating heart. But beyond the rolling hills and behind the stable doors lies a green and not-so-pleasant land...

When the body of a local teenage boy is found underneath the wheels of a tractor, the villagers in this remote community – his friends – are forced to open up their world and watch their secrets spill out. Secrets that will change their particular brand of country life forever.

Starring:
Yasmin Paige
Jordan Stephens
Callum Turner
Charlotte Spencer
Faye Marsay
Jessie Cave
Tommy McDonnell
Billy Howle
Tommy Lawrence Knight
Kerry Fox
Jonny Owen
Kierston Wareing
Steve Oram


Song: Love Is To Die - Warpaint






[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCdqjemHoCw&nohtml5=False[/youtube]
TRAILER 2: Glue | This September | E4
Published on Aug 26, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yr2bH__9VxI[/youtube]
The Day Before | Glue Prequel Mini-Eps | E4
Published on Sep 15, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3qy4oUB4Ww&nohtml5=False[/youtube]
Glue Episode 2 | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Sep 15, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDliSekSB7U&nohtml5=False[/youtube]
Glue Episode 3 | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Sep 22, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvTFsXT4SNM&nohtml5=False[/youtube]
Glue Episode 4 | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Oct 3, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlXDSwPRS04[/youtube]
Glue Episode 5 | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Oct 7, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QtJPXDK3Nw[/youtube]
Glue Episode 6 | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Oct 14, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQirC6iNxQU[/youtube]
Glue Episode 7 | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Oct 23, 2014







[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzgZuO15tFM[/youtube]
NO SPOILERS: Glue Final Episode | Monday, 10pm | E4
Published on Oct 30, 2014


« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 09:47:27 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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GLUE_E4TV_2014_BILLY HOWLE (JAMES)


http://www.interviewmagazine.com/new-wave
http://www.interviewmagazine.com/film/billy-howle/#_


FILM
BILLY HOWLE
By EMMA BROWN
Photography CRAIG MCDEAN

Published 06/08/15








"People always use the phrase in character," says British actor Billy Howle. "You are a performer—you're always cognizant of the fact that everything you're doing is heightened, and it has to be." Howle is not a method actor, but you would never know it from watching him on the stage or screen; whether as a farm boy embroiled in secrets and murder in the British television series Glue or a 19th-century painter succumbing to disease in the Almeida Theatre's production of Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the 25-year-old brings an earnest empathy to each of his roles.

Growing up in Scarborough, England, with a schoolteacher mother, a music professor father, and three brothers, Howle had a readymade audience for his dramatic impulses. "As a child, I was bouncing off the walls," he says. "Any opportunity to dress up in other people's clothes, wear hats or wigs, put on performances for people, create puppet theaters," Howle took advantage. It was doing community theater as a teenager, however—particularly creating workshops for children with behavioral difficulties and special needs—that truly sparked Howle's passion for acting. As a result, Howle enrolled at Jeremy Irons's alma mater, the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. "I decided to learn the conventions of classical theater so I could then bend the rules later on," he says. In the two years since he graduated, Howle has booked some impressive roles: In addition to Glue and Ghosts, he also appeared in the miniseries New Worlds with Jamie Dornan. This summer, he will begin shooting his first film, an adaptation of Chekhov's play The Seagull, in which he will star as Konstantin, opposite Annette Bening and Saoirse Ronan.




EMMA BROWN: Do you come from an artistic family?

BILLY HOWLE: Yes, my mum and dad are still together and they're both very creative. My mum taught at comprehensive schools and kind of troubleshooted in classes for kids who weren't perhaps doing as well as they could be doing. So that, in itself, I think, is quite a creative skill. It requires a lot of thinking outside the box. My dad is a professor at Kent University —electroacoustic composition, 20th century composers, and that sort of thing. One of my brothers is a classical guitarist. My older brother is a graphic designer. Then my youngest brother is this a, I want to say jack of all trades, but he's more a master of all trades—he seems to take to something really, really well. He's also really interested by acting. There is this weirdly uncanny resemblance.

BROWN: Oh really?

HOWLE: I went to see him in this play. He's like six foot two or something, so he's taller than me, but looks not too dissimilar to how I did when I was 15. He has this angst, but it's quite a mature angst. He's riding against something that feels unjust, and I feel like I can definitely relate to that at 15.

BROWN: That's nice that you can be close because that's quite a big age gap.

HOWLE: Yeah, it is. But you wouldn't think it to sit down and talk to him. He can really hold his own in most social settings; he's a very switched-on kid.

BROWN: You thought about going to university to study English, correct?

HOWLE: I did consider it. I tried to go to college in the UK a couple of time, but at that point I think I was a little disillusioned with education. It wasn't giving me what I wanted it to. I needed freedom to create and do the things that I wanted to explore, and it wasn't really doing that: it was still very prescriptive. I think I was already ready to move on to university and really specialize in something, perhaps. I went back to my local theater, the Stephen Joseph in Scarborough, and worked with community-based theater projects. We did clowning workshops, drama therapy-type things, mask stuff. I had done acting as a kid, but I became a lot more serious about it. So I went to the Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol for three years. [Before that] I did one year at another drama school as a foundation, and then came back and did more community theater. It still felt very much indulgent and very much about me, and I don't believe that acting is that. I feel like I'm a professional storyteller, really. A lot of people say "a truth teller," and, if the writing supports it, that's what your aim is: to try and present people with a series of truths, and then they can make up their mind about those and whether they have any real credence or weight.

BROWN: Glue and Ghosts are both great projects. Have you ever had that pressure where you take a job to get exposure, or just to be working?

HOWLE: [laughs] You come across scripts where you're very aware that a writer has a remit too, and sometimes that's box-ticking for them, and I'm sure that's soulless, and I'm sure they'd prefer to be working on something that they're truly passionate about. We know that, in the same way that artists have to create mug prints or tea cloths or whatever—they have to do that so that they can then create the work they really want to. Someone once said to me that sometimes you've got to do the crowd-pleasers. I feel that writers also fit into that, and they also have to do the stuff to pay the bills in order to survive. So occasionally you'll come across a piece of writing and it could be full of exposition and it's very formulaic and doesn't inspire you to want to do it. But it is a collaborative art form—I believe it's a pure art form, acting in itself—and the art of making TV, making film, making theater, depends on every component and every participant. The true art is being able to take whatever the writer's done, and if it is a bit flimsy or it is a bit rushed or is just box-ticking writing, then the true artist would be able to make that come off the page and sing for an audience, or a viewer. I'm still learning how to do that properly. It's about negotiation—that's what most collaboration is.

BROWN: You mentioned you started auditioning professionally before you had officially left drama school. Did you have an agent?

HOWLE: Yeah, I had already casually signed with an agent, and was travelling from Bristol to London at five in the morning to get to an audition for nine. I was being almost like a zealot—being really vigilant with when I travelled, and being really prepared.

BROWN: What were you like as a child?

HOWLE: I was mad. I feel like I still have that energy to a certain degree, it's much more nervous and self-conscious now. I was fascinated by performing, definitely. I had that extroverted energy and I always involved myself in quite adult conversations. My mum never hid us from that. There was never a kid's table; we were never treated as kids, per se, because I don't think she believes in that.

BROWN: Did you believe in Father Christmas as a child?

HOWLE: I think we all have this kind of "Howle cynicism," and that happens quite early on. You can imagine what it was like for my youngest brother, having three older brothers, and him still believing in Father Christmas. We we were constantly picking on him for things like that—playing small tricks. I think we were always interested in the fact that my mum always put out this brandy and this mince pie and carrots. We were fascinated by the brandy, my brother and I. We wanted to know what it was and what it did. [laughs]

BROWN: Did you ever steal it?

HOWLE: I think we did try it. But my parents have kind of a European outlook on things like that, in the sense of allowing you to sample things at a younger age in the safety of your own home. I think exclusivity is a pretty dangerous thing.

BROWN: Did you ever have an imaginary friend?

HOWLE: I was always quite jealous of my older brother Sam because he had an imaginary friend that I think he fully believed in. It was quite magical to me. I tried to have one myself, but I couldn't do it. I tried to picture it and see what they may look like. My brother once described it to me, and I wanted to join in the game, so I created this character almost arbitrarily that was walking beside me. But mine was quite dark and elusive, and because it was so dark and elusive I kind of gave it a miss. It was like, "I don't know if I want to get to know this guy, Sam" and he was like,  "Why? It's great!" My older brother used to run off through the woods on these long walks with his imaginary friend. Because we're so close in age—we're two years apart—we kind of grew up together and the imaginary friend was a spanner in the works for me. [laughs]

BROWN: I like that you created this imaginary friend who didn't really want to hang out with you.

HOWLE: I think in my brain I was trying to be the imaginary friend. I was more interested in me doing that than creating someone else. Whereas Sam is a much more a pictorial, visual person, which is why he graphic designs.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"