Author Topic: London Spy: Ben Whishaw, dreamy lover/genius Ed Holcroft and sage Jim Broadbent  (Read 183864 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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TOMROBSMITH<3!LONDONSPYFANART@TWITTER!  






LONDONSPYFANART[email protected]!
http://j000000.tumblr.com


Guys guys listen up!! I just asked Mr. TRS on twitter about
may I send one copy of the fanbook I’m making to him,
he just give me he’s agent’s address!
(which wasn’t show on his website). And complete  script
of London Spy!!! Can’t wait for it!!!







I’m still inking last 20 pages now, can’t wait to finish it and send it to him!!!
Wish me luck!!!

Tags: london spy omgomg i'm so excited!!!


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYFANARTJO
http://j000000.tumblr.com

Well, I've finally
done it--I contacted
Jo the artist and
ordered 3 copies of
the new fan book--
see below!



Hi Jo, I love your work. I am attempting to buy three copies
of your newly released Spy Book (Danny and Alex) but
unfortunately the (Paypal?) page is NOT translated into English--
I'm unable to read the written instructions on the buttons,
so I don't know how to send you $. Thanks very much!  
(are you aware that Tom Rob Smith has said via twitter
he wants to publish the best Fan Art with the London Spy
scripts in his new book? Contact him, he loves your stuff!) JG

Hello! Thanks for telling me the good news, I’ve twit him some of
my fan arts, hope he’ll pick some of them for his scripts :D

About the paypal page, do you mean the information page?
There’s a “change language” button on top of the page, click
the little USA flag and the page will be in English.

Hope this answers your question, thanks for asking!
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYFANARTJO
http://j000000.tumblr.com
https://twitter.com/TonyxsteveStony/media


Jo is determined:
Danny to the Rescue!
21 March 2016  Jo(อิ‿อิ)✧˖° ‏@TonyxsteveStony




17 March 2016  Jo(อิ‿อิ)✧˖° ‏@TonyxsteveStony




17 March 2016  Jo(อิ‿อิ)✧˖° ‏@TonyxsteveStony




17 March 2016  Jo(อิ‿อิ)✧˖° ‏@TonyxsteveStony




17 March 2016  Jo(อิ‿อิ)✧˖° ‏@TonyxsteveStony




5th March 2016  http://j000000.tumblr.com/post/140514225496/




1st March 2016  http://j000000.tumblr.com/post/140217428601/i-finally-finished-it-now-i-can-move-on-to-my




1st March 2016  http://j000000.tumblr.com/post/140217428601/i-finally-finished-it-now-i-can-move-on-to-my




11th February 2016  http://j000000.tumblr.com/page/2




28th January 2016  http://j000000.tumblr.com/page/4




15th January 2016  http://j000000.tumblr.com/page/4


https://twitter.com/TonyxsteveStony/media
http://j000000.tumblr.com
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline southendmd

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  • well, I won't
John, thanks for bumping this thread.  I just may have to head over to my Amazon thingie and watch London Spy again!

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 10:50:09 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Finally.  Opens March 10 2017.



Charlotte Rampling and Jim Broadbent in 'The Sense of an Ending'




AND. The screenwriter was--NICK PAYNE. Yes, the same young Nick Payne who wrote the plays If There Is I Haven't Found It Yet  and Constellations, those two plays that guy starred in--what was that actor's name again??  ::)


The Sense of an Ending  is Nick's first screenplay.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Payne


ALSO, FYI: The actor playing the doomed Adrian Finn is the actor Joe Alwyn--who recently starred in Ang Lee's Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk  (2016).




                                                       

The Sense of an Ending (2017)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4827986/


Writing
Julian Barnes               (novel)
Nick Payne                  (adaptation)
Nick Payne                  (screenplay)




Directed by
Ritesh Batra   



Cast
Jim Broadbent             Tony Webster
Billy Howle                  Young Tony

Charlotte Rampling       Veronica Ford
Freya Mavor                 Young Veronica

Joe Alwyn                    Adrian Finn

Edward Holcroft           Jack Ford

Harriet Walter              Margaret
Michelle Dockery          Susie   

Nick Mohammed          Danny
Timothy Innes             Young Alex
   






Quote from: Aloysius J. Gleek on February 17, 2016, 09:17:54 pm topic=53215.msg674758#msg674758

http://www.interviewmagazine.com/culture/edward-holcroft



CULTURE
SPY GAMES
EDWARD HOLCROFT
IN LONDON JANUARY 2016
By HALEY WEISS
Photography HANS NEUMANN
Published 02/04/16



(EXCERPT)

(....)

WEISS: You were able to work with Charlotte Rampling and Jim Broadbent again in The Sense of an Ending. Was filming more comfortable having known them from London Spy?

HOLCROFT: No, it was terrible.
[He is joking. See full interview posted above, page 9 http://bettermost.net/forum/index.php/topic,53215.msg674758.html#msg674758 ]

WEISS: Everything is terrible.

HOLCROFT: Everything is terrible! [laughs] I didn't actually have much to do with them in The Sense of an Ending. I know that they're in it, but my scenes weren't with them. But I did see Jim. Charlotte and Jim are kind of brilliant examples of not only very talented actors, but just such nice people. I can't begin to tell you. They're so unfazed by the industry side of it, they don't really have time for it, which is such an admirable quality when people are really talented. They don't buy in to some of the bullshit that comes with it. They have very quiet lives and they're great.

WEISS: I read that you think it's important to maintain a certain air of mystery as an actor. Can you tell me a little bit about that?

HOLCROFT: I don't think it's a new concept. I should think most actors probably think this, but I know that when I watch actors, the actors who I know least about I buy into more because I can imagine them as the character. It's as simple as that. If you lead a very high profile life—and of course, it's easy to say this, and if you become incredibly famous because of your work some of that is unavoidable—but if you can do as much as you can to keep away from some of that limelight then you just help yourself when it comes to your work. You have a blank canvas, as it were, to work with, rather than people knowing a whole bunch about your life or what you get up to, what you had for breakfast. Everyone is different, and each to their own, as they say, but for me that's what I would like to try and establish.

(....)

LONDON SPY AIRS THURSDAYS ON BBC AMERICA AT 10PM ET.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYLNTQGpNQ0[/youtube]
Published on Dec 13, 2016
The Sense of an Ending Official Trailer 1 (2017)




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Once again--

The Sense of an Ending (2017)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4827986/

Cast
Jim Broadbent as Tony Webster      Billy Howle as Young Tony
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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And once again--

GLUE_E4TV_2014_BILLY HOWLE (JAMES)


http://www.interviewmagazine.com/new-wave
http://www.interviewmagazine.com/film/billy-howle/#_


FILM
BILLY HOWLE
By EMMA BROWN
Photography CRAIG MCDEAN

Published 06/08/15








"People always use the phrase in character," says British actor Billy Howle. "You are a performer—you're always cognizant of the fact that everything you're doing is heightened, and it has to be." Howle is not a method actor, but you would never know it from watching him on the stage or screen; whether as a farm boy embroiled in secrets and murder in the British television series Glue or a 19th-century painter succumbing to disease in the Almeida Theatre's production of Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the 25-year-old brings an earnest empathy to each of his roles.

Growing up in Scarborough, England, with a schoolteacher mother, a music professor father, and three brothers, Howle had a readymade audience for his dramatic impulses. "As a child, I was bouncing off the walls," he says. "Any opportunity to dress up in other people's clothes, wear hats or wigs, put on performances for people, create puppet theaters," Howle took advantage. It was doing community theater as a teenager, however—particularly creating workshops for children with behavioral difficulties and special needs—that truly sparked Howle's passion for acting. As a result, Howle enrolled at Jeremy Irons's alma mater, the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. "I decided to learn the conventions of classical theater so I could then bend the rules later on," he says. In the two years since he graduated, Howle has booked some impressive roles: In addition to Glue and Ghosts, he also appeared in the miniseries New Worlds with Jamie Dornan. This summer, he will begin shooting his first film, an adaptation of Chekhov's play The Seagull, in which he will star as Konstantin, opposite Annette Bening and Saoirse Ronan.




EMMA BROWN: Do you come from an artistic family?

BILLY HOWLE: Yes, my mum and dad are still together and they're both very creative. My mum taught at comprehensive schools and kind of troubleshooted in classes for kids who weren't perhaps doing as well as they could be doing. So that, in itself, I think, is quite a creative skill. It requires a lot of thinking outside the box. My dad is a professor at Kent University —electroacoustic composition, 20th century composers, and that sort of thing. One of my brothers is a classical guitarist. My older brother is a graphic designer. Then my youngest brother is this a, I want to say jack of all trades, but he's more a master of all trades—he seems to take to something really, really well. He's also really interested by acting. There is this weirdly uncanny resemblance.

BROWN: Oh really?

HOWLE: I went to see him in this play. He's like six foot two or something, so he's taller than me, but looks not too dissimilar to how I did when I was 15. He has this angst, but it's quite a mature angst. He's riding against something that feels unjust, and I feel like I can definitely relate to that at 15.

BROWN: That's nice that you can be close because that's quite a big age gap.

HOWLE: Yeah, it is. But you wouldn't think it to sit down and talk to him. He can really hold his own in most social settings; he's a very switched-on kid.

BROWN: You thought about going to university to study English, correct?

HOWLE: I did consider it. I tried to go to college in the UK a couple of time, but at that point I think I was a little disillusioned with education. It wasn't giving me what I wanted it to. I needed freedom to create and do the things that I wanted to explore, and it wasn't really doing that: it was still very prescriptive. I think I was already ready to move on to university and really specialize in something, perhaps. I went back to my local theater, the Stephen Joseph in Scarborough, and worked with community-based theater projects. We did clowning workshops, drama therapy-type things, mask stuff. I had done acting as a kid, but I became a lot more serious about it. So I went to the Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol for three years. [Before that] I did one year at another drama school as a foundation, and then came back and did more community theater. It still felt very much indulgent and very much about me, and I don't believe that acting is that. I feel like I'm a professional storyteller, really. A lot of people say "a truth teller," and, if the writing supports it, that's what your aim is: to try and present people with a series of truths, and then they can make up their mind about those and whether they have any real credence or weight.

BROWN: Glue and Ghosts are both great projects. Have you ever had that pressure where you take a job to get exposure, or just to be working?

HOWLE: [laughs] You come across scripts where you're very aware that a writer has a remit too, and sometimes that's box-ticking for them, and I'm sure that's soulless, and I'm sure they'd prefer to be working on something that they're truly passionate about. We know that, in the same way that artists have to create mug prints or tea cloths or whatever—they have to do that so that they can then create the work they really want to. Someone once said to me that sometimes you've got to do the crowd-pleasers. I feel that writers also fit into that, and they also have to do the stuff to pay the bills in order to survive. So occasionally you'll come across a piece of writing and it could be full of exposition and it's very formulaic and doesn't inspire you to want to do it. But it is a collaborative art form—I believe it's a pure art form, acting in itself—and the art of making TV, making film, making theater, depends on every component and every participant. The true art is being able to take whatever the writer's done, and if it is a bit flimsy or it is a bit rushed or is just box-ticking writing, then the true artist would be able to make that come off the page and sing for an audience, or a viewer. I'm still learning how to do that properly. It's about negotiation—that's what most collaboration is.

BROWN: You mentioned you started auditioning professionally before you had officially left drama school. Did you have an agent?

HOWLE: Yeah, I had already casually signed with an agent, and was travelling from Bristol to London at five in the morning to get to an audition for nine. I was being almost like a zealot—being really vigilant with when I travelled, and being really prepared.

BROWN: What were you like as a child?

HOWLE: I was mad. I feel like I still have that energy to a certain degree, it's much more nervous and self-conscious now. I was fascinated by performing, definitely. I had that extroverted energy and I always involved myself in quite adult conversations. My mum never hid us from that. There was never a kid's table; we were never treated as kids, per se, because I don't think she believes in that.

BROWN: Did you believe in Father Christmas as a child?

HOWLE: I think we all have this kind of "Howle cynicism," and that happens quite early on. You can imagine what it was like for my youngest brother, having three older brothers, and him still believing in Father Christmas. We we were constantly picking on him for things like that—playing small tricks. I think we were always interested in the fact that my mum always put out this brandy and this mince pie and carrots. We were fascinated by the brandy, my brother and I. We wanted to know what it was and what it did. [laughs]

BROWN: Did you ever steal it?

HOWLE: I think we did try it. But my parents have kind of a European outlook on things like that, in the sense of allowing you to sample things at a younger age in the safety of your own home. I think exclusivity is a pretty dangerous thing.

BROWN: Did you ever have an imaginary friend?

HOWLE: I was always quite jealous of my older brother Sam because he had an imaginary friend that I think he fully believed in. It was quite magical to me. I tried to have one myself, but I couldn't do it. I tried to picture it and see what they may look like. My brother once described it to me, and I wanted to join in the game, so I created this character almost arbitrarily that was walking beside me. But mine was quite dark and elusive, and because it was so dark and elusive I kind of gave it a miss. It was like, "I don't know if I want to get to know this guy, Sam" and he was like,  "Why? It's great!" My older brother used to run off through the woods on these long walks with his imaginary friend. Because we're so close in age—we're two years apart—we kind of grew up together and the imaginary friend was a spanner in the works for me. [laughs]

BROWN: I like that you created this imaginary friend who didn't really want to hang out with you.

HOWLE: I think in my brain I was trying to be the imaginary friend. I was more interested in me doing that than creating someone else. Whereas Sam is a much more a pictorial, visual person, which is why he graphic designs.



« Last Edit: February 16, 2017, 06:16:58 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"