Author Topic: London Spy: Ben Whishaw, dreamy lover/genius Ed Holcroft and sage Jim Broadbent  (Read 166723 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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AND FYI:  Ed Holcroft will be starring in Alias Grace  (2017) as Dr Simon Jordan:


http://www.cbc.ca/books/2016/06/sarah-polley-alias-grace-margaret-atwood-cbc-netflix.html



Canadian actress and director Sarah Polley will begin production on her adaptation of Alias Grace  in Ontario this August. The Margaret Atwood novel, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 1996, will become a six-hour miniseries to air on CBC-TV and Netflix.

Alias Grace  is a work of historical fiction inspired by the story of a notorious Irish-Canadian maid named Grace Marks, who was convicted of two murders in the 1840s. After spending 30 years in prison, Marks was exonerated for the deaths of her employer Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery.

The novel (and upcoming series) focuses on a fictional doctor named Simon Jordan, a young upstart in the new field of mental health. Jordan investigates the case at the behest of a group seeking pardon for Grace, and finds himself becoming obsessed with the young woman.

"I first read Alias Grace  when I was 17 years old and throughout the last 20 years I have read it over and over, trying to get to the bottom of it," said Polley, who wrote the script.
"Grace Marks, as captured by Margaret Atwood, is the most complex, riveting character I have ever read... I can't wait for us to bring the many versions of Grace's gripping story, and the questions they raise, to television audiences."

Alias Grace  will be directed by American Psycho  director Mary Harron and produced by Halfire Entertainment.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline CellarDweller

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the fan art is always so good.   I'm jealous.  I wish I could be artistic like that.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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the fan art is always so good.   I'm jealous.  I wish I could be artistic like that.






Me too, Chuck, me too.   :-\ :-*



Late Edit--
I meant to mention that the
FLOWERS were perfect here for
VALENTINE'S DAY!
  ;D


LONDONSPYFANARTJO





referencing

Quote by Aloysius J. Gleek on Jan 29/Feb 12, 2016, 11:17:38 pm





« Last Edit: February 17, 2017, 04:49:53 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYFANART_MY_NAME_IS_ALEXX
http://mynameisalexx.tumblr.com/




Alex’s hands are trembling


NOV 24TH 2015 1833 NOTES

#london spy   #danny holt   #alex "alistair" turner
#danny x alex  #ben whishaw   #edward holcroft
#FUCK   #NO   #I never noticed his hands  
#oh no   #oh poor thing   #*cries forever





REFERENCING--





London Spy
Episode 1
"Lullaby"




DANNY: It's normally tidier than this...
(Then truthfully, he says)
No, it's never tidier than this.








"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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LONDONSPYFANART_HIOMIW
http://hiomiw.tumblr.com/

tokyo / japanese /
dreamer since twelve years old /
inception / Sherlock bbc /  00q /
hannibal / london spy / art






I am looking forward to watching EP3!!!! Yes!


NOV 23RD 2015 78 NOTES

#london spy   #fan art   #my art   #danny holt   #alex "alistair" turner
#danny x alex  #ben whishaw   #edward holcroft
#danny and alex's hands

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/sense-an-ending-review-961326





The Sense of an Ending
Palm Springs 2017 Review
Jim Broadbent, Charlotte Rampling and Michelle Dockery
star in a big-screen adaptation of the widely praised
Julian Barnes novel about a love triangle and its consequences
over several decades.


The Bottom Line:
A mildly engaging adaptation of a bold book.


by Todd McCarthy
8:15 PM PST 1/5/2017



Charlotte Rampling and Jim Broadbent in The Sense of an Ending
Courtesy of Palm Springs International Film Festival



PALM SPRINGS -- Julian Barnes' short, penetrating novel about how we self-protectively edit our memories receives an intelligent, low-key, necessarily diluted big-screen treatment in The Sense of an Ending. More intellectually preoccupied with charting convulsive emotions rather than coursing with them, Barnes' Man Booker Prize-winning 2011 novel traces the lingering and, ultimately, galvanic effect youthful behavior has on a set of characters a half-century later. Ritesh Batra, in his first outing since making an international name for himself four years ago with The Lunchbox, does a subtle, nuanced job in dealing with the old folks' unearthed primal issues, even as his film settles for reassuring lessons learned rather than challenging provocations.

Anglophiles and graying art house aficionados represent the main audience for this well-acted drama flecked with quiet humor, which CBS Films will open domestically on March 10 in the wake of the film's world premiere as the opening-night attraction at the Palm Springs International Film Festival.

A venturesome exploration into human nature, the book is not one that readily announces itself as a prime candidate for cinematic transfer. But it's never advisable to underestimate what wily, experienced British actors can do with incorrigible old-timer characters, and so it proves here with Jim Broadbent in the role of Tony Webster, a solitary old gent whose past abruptly retakes possession of him.

The mildly grumpy but mentally alert septuagenarian lives comfortably enough while maintaining a hole-in-the-wall camera store that exclusively stocks secondhand Leicas. He rather uselessly accompanies his heavily pregnant lesbian daughter, Susie (Michelle Dockery), to birthing class and seems devoid of any consuming interests or close friends.

Sending his serene autumnal cruise into choppy waters is the arrival of a legal letter revealing an unexpected cash bequest from a late school chum, as well as a promised copy of the man's diary, which is nonetheless not forthcoming. Thus is unleashed a spray of flashbacks devoted to Tony's college years and beyond, covering his intense admiration for the handsome and brilliant Adrian (Joe Alwyn, recently of Ang Lee's Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk ) and his equivocal courtship of the alluring but elusive Veronica (Freya Mavor), who later paired up with Adrian.

Tony (well-played in youth by Billy Howle) broke off with both of them by sending Veronica an ill-advisedly bilious letter wishing them nothing but the worst, and it's at this point in the narrative that the novel begins to profoundly investigate the issue of selective memories, how people enshrine some chosen events and conveniently forget others. By contrast, the film skates over the surface of this investigation, remaining content to observe the behavioral quirks in old Tony's relationships with his guarded ex-wife, Margaret (Harriet Walter), and, eventually, with the still-elusive Veronica (played in old age by Charlotte Rampling), who won't spell anything out for Tony but nonetheless makes him see truths he could never see for himself.

Debuting screenwriter Nick Payne nimbly shuffles the dramatic deck with the aim of fleshing out the protagonist's late-in-life progression from mildly cranky old bloke to one willing to re-embrace life's mysteries and his own past — which means confronting some unsettling revelations and adapting to new emotional realities. But what were painful cuts to the quick on the page are reduced to mild lessons learned on the screen, making for a passably involving experience, rather than an indelible one.

That said, the lineup of fine actors keenly registers minute details about the passage of time with humor, wisdom and a sharp sense of how moments of rash or just misguided behavior can forever dictate a life's path (no matter how one rearranges things to sweep regrets under the rug). Nor can one have any idea what the consequences of one's actions have truly meant to the others involved at the time.

Batra moves the action along briskly and smoothly — perhaps a bit too much so to let some of the story's bitter truths have the bite they should. The director extends sympathy and understanding to all the characters, a talent shared by many great artists, but the courage to confront terrible ironies would also have been required to fully render this tale on the screen.

Broadbent is smooth, self-effacing and something of a subtle ham as the old-timer whose view of himself and the past acquires significant clarity. Walter, Dockery and Rampling, playing women who have differing issues with Tony, are tautly spring-loaded with repressed feelings they're mostly loathe to express, while Emily Mortimer has her moments as the young Veronica's frisky, hard-to-read mother.

Fine behind-the-scenes contributions make for a smooth ride all around.


Production company: Origin Pictures

Distributor: CBS Films

Cast: Jim Broadbent, Harriet Walter, Michelle Dockery, Emily Mortimer, Billy Howle, Freya Mavor, Charlotte Rampling, Joe Alwyn, James Wilby, Edward Holcroft

Director: Ritesh Batra

Screenwriter: Nick Payne, based on the novel by Julian Barnes

Producers: David M. Thompson, Ed Rubin

Executive producers: Ben Browning, Aaron Ryder, Glen Basner, Milan Popelka, Norman Merry, Christine Langan, Ed Wethered

Director of photography: Christopher Ross

Production designer: Jacqueline Abrahams

Costume designer: Odile Dicks-Mireaux

Editor: John F. Lyons

Music: Max Richter

Casting director: Nina Gold

Venue: Palm Springs International Film Festival (Opening Night)

Sales: FilmNation Entertainment

Rated PG-13, 109 minutes


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://variety.com/2017/film/reviews/the-sense-of-an-ending-review-1201953824/




Film Review:
The Sense of an Ending
by Peter Debruge
[email protected]
Chief Film Critic
@AskDebruge


JANUARY 5, 2017 | 08:18PM PT




A guilt-stricken divorcé is reluctant to accept that his impact on the lives of two old friends might have been less than he's grappled with all these years.


A couple years back, festival audiences fell in love with Indian director Ritesh Batra’s genuine gem of a debut, “The Lunchbox,” in which an accountant on the brink of retirement exchanges intimate notes with the complete stranger who has been cooking for him each day. That low-key treasure displayed Batra’s unique touch for the subtle sense of longing and mystery that can haunt men of a certain age, and proved to be an ideal precursor to the director’s first English-language film, “The Sense of an Ending,” a well-acted, if somewhat trickier dish to digest, focusing on a British divorcé’s futile search for closure to a long-ago relationship.

As source material goes, “The Sense of an Ending” is rather more literary, adapted from Julian Barnes’ 2011 novel by playwright Nick Payne, and one can feel the ideas knocking about behind the deceptively simple-looking facades of its characters. Fusty curmudgeon Tony Webster (Jim Broadbent) appears content to have traded his ambitions as a poet for a life spent tending a tiny vintage camera shop. It was an early girlfriend, Veronica (Freya Mavor), who gave Tony his first Leica camera, though the humiliation of losing her to an old schoolmate also seems to have shaped his younger self (played by Billy Howle). But whose love was Tony more devastated to lose: hers or the golden boy they both admired?

“The Sense of an Ending” wallows in such ambiguities for much of its running time, even as it comes straight out and states its thesis early on, when Adrian (“Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” star Joe Alwyn) recites in class: “History is that certainty produced at the point where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation.” Adrian claims to be quoting a scholar named Patrick Lagrange to explain why he considers it futile to ascribe responsibility to a fellow student’s suicide. Lagrange, as it turns out, does not exist, but then, isn’t that the film’s point? This flashback to Tony’s school days has been lifted directly from his memory, which is itself distorted not only by time, but by a sort of deliberate rewriting on Tony’s part, for he must find a way to live with himself after what happened to his good friend. As it turns out, he doesn’t know the half of it.

Tony’s rather unflattering plunge into self-absorption begins with the receipt of a letter, and like those wonderful thoughts that take shape only gradually over the course of several days in “The Lunchbox,” he takes rather a long time to get around to reading it. In places, “The Sense of an Ending” seems almost frustratingly uninterested in establishing, much less solving, the riddles at its core, when in fact, it’s merely uninterested in pandering to those who lack the patience to appreciate its nuances. Its most receptive audiences will almost certainly be older, with enough life experience to recognize the mix of curiosity and regret that ensnares us like so many wild brambles each time we hazard a stroll down Memory Lane.

The letter refers to a diary, which once belonged to Adrian but had since passed into the hands of Veronica’s mother, Sarah (Emily Mortimer, by far the liveliest presence amid all the film’s flashback scenes), for reasons that aren’t entirely clear — though in bequeathing it to Tony, Sarah dredges the past back up again. The movie, which fairly pulses with a latent homoeroticism just beneath the surface every time its hot-blooded young characters look at one another, teases us with possible explanations: What exactly is the nature of Tony and Adrian’s past relationship? Does Tony fancy both Veronica and her mother, or perhaps it’s her brother [Edward Holcroft] who occupies his solitary late-night fantasies? And what does his ex-wife (Harriet Walter) — or their very pregnant daughter (Michelle Dockery) — make of all this?

The explanation is at once simpler and more complicated than any of these questions could suggest, and it is revealed only after the last of the onion’s layers has been peeled away. It works to the film’s advantage that someone as benign as Broadbent should be playing Tony, since it offsets what a disagreeable character he might otherwise have been: Despite not being a particularly interesting or clever person in his own right, Tony is single-mindedly obsessed with resolving a relationship that played itself out decades earlier, to the point of stalking an ex who had otherwise left all memory of him in the dust.

Charlotte Rampling plays Veronica in the present, though she doesn’t appear until late in the film, like an ace that Batra has been keeping up his sleeve. Still beyond his grasp, Veronica has intercepted Adrian’s diary and has no intentions of returning it to Tony, which drives him crazy, sending him deeper into the spiral of his own narcissism — a far more unpleasant space to share if it weren’t for the wry way that Walter’s character (augmented significantly from the novel) has of humoring him. And Max Richter’s seductive score turns potential revulsion into a sort of unrequited melancholy.

Like a male-centric counterpart to Iain McEwan’s “Atonement,” Tony’s journey offers a poignant commentary on how each of us attempts to make meaning of our lives, distorting memories and destroying documentation to suit agendas we can’t entirely rationalize. It’s a fundamental human impulse to seek meaning in things, and yet, as Tony ultimately realizes, the corollary to the butterfly effect — where the smallest incident can have a seismic impact on other people’s lives — is admitting that sometimes we’ve left absolutely no impression at all.



Film Review: 'The Sense of an Ending'
Reviewed at Palm Springs Intl. Film Festival (opener), Jan. 5, 2017. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 108 MIN.

Production
(U.K.) A CBS Films release, presented with BBC Films, FilmNation Entertainment, in association with LipSync, of an Origin Pictures production. Producers: David Thompson, Ed Rubin. Executive producers: Ben Browning, Aaron Ryder, Glen Basner, Milian Popelka, Norman Merry, Christine Langan, Ed Wethered. Co-producers: Sarada McDermott, Joanie Blaikie.

Crew
Director: Ritesh Batra. Screenplay: Nick Payne, based on the novel by Julian Barnes. Camera (color, widescreen): Christopher Ross. Editor: John F. Lyons. Music; Max Richter.

With
Jim Broadbent, Charlotte Rampling, Harriet Walter, Michelle Dockery, Matthew Goode, Emily Mortimer, James Wilby, Edward Holcroft, Billy Howle, Freya Mavor, Joe Alwyn, Peter Wight. Hilton McRae, Jack Loxton, Timothy Innes, Andrew Buckley.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Ya'll can have Ben Whishaw. I'll take Billy Howle, thank you very much.  ;D

(He's the blue-eyed beauty in the checked shirt to the right of Charlotte Rampling.)
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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  • A city boy's mentality, with a cowboy's soul.
jeff wants his pick, dammit!   ;)


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!