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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017) 0 Residents and 5 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 184799 times)
Aloysius J. Gleek
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« on: August 01, 2017, 04:49:33 pm »





 





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« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2017, 04:59:40 pm »







CALL ME BY YOUR NAME Official Trailer (2017)
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet
Published on Aug 1, 2017




A sensual and transcendent tale of first love, based on the acclaimed novel by André Aciman. It's the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, and Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet), a precocious 17- year-old American-Italian boy, spends his days in his family's 17th century villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading, and flirting with his friend Marzia (Esther Garrel). Elio enjoys a close relationship with his father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture, and his mother Annella (Amira Casar), a translator, who favor him with the fruits of high culture in a setting that overflows with natural delights. While Elio's sophistication and intellectual gifts suggest he is already a fully-fledged adult, there is much that yet remains innocent and unformed about him, particularly about matters of the heart. One day, Oliver (Armie Hammer), a charming American scholar working on his doctorate, arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.


Directed By:   Luca Guadagnino
Written By:    Luca Guadagnino, James Ivory, Walter Fasano
In Theaters:   Nov 24, 2017  Limited
Runtime:       130 minutes
Studio:          Sony Pictures Classics



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« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2017, 05:05:11 pm »






https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B89tJUc_f0

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (2017)
ELIO MEETS OLIVER
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet
Published on Feb 10, 2017





« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 09:35:05 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2017, 05:19:52 pm »






https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkJ5H_LnRTY

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (2017)
ELIO AND OLIVER
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet
Published on Jan 31, 2017





« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 09:35:38 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2017, 05:27:45 pm »






“A happy ending was imperative,” Forster wrote, in 1960. “I was determined that in fiction anyway two men should fall in love and remain in it for the ever and ever that fiction allows. . . . I dedicated it ‘To a Happier Year’ and not altogether vainly.”



http://www.newyorker.com/culture/persons-of-interest/james-ivory-and-the-making-of-a-historic-gay-love-story

JAMES IVORY AND THE MAKING OF A HISTORIC GAY LOVE STORY


For many gay men coming of age in the eighties and nineties, James Ivory’s “Maurice” was revelatory: a first glimpse, onscreen or anywhere,
of what love between men could look like.
  PHOTOGRAPH BY TIM KNOX / EYEVINE / REDUX




[EXCERPT]


The house in Claverack, bought in 1975, has nineteen rooms, with high ceilings and huge windows. Its eleven acres have a pond and several small buildings; “A Room with a View” was edited in a former apple-storage barn. At one point during my visit, Ivory brought me into the parlor where the interview with Merchant from the “Householder” DVD had taken place. The murals, which Ivory commissioned, are of imagined Hudson Valley landscapes circa 1800. He opened a cabinet topped with baftas to reveal a collection of elegant dioramas, one of them in a former pralines box. He handed them to me one by one and let me look through each tiny doorway: into an 1820 New Orleans boudoir; a 1761 Mt. Pleasant, Philadelphia, drawing room. He made them when he was thirteen.

That weekend, in a convivial Forsterian scenario, he had three houseguests. All of them had worked on Merchant Ivory films. Jeremiah Rusconi, the art director for “The Europeans,” has also directed, over the years, the restoration of the house; now a restoration consultant, he currently lives there. Melissa Chung, a friend who began working for Merchant Ivory as a production assistant right out of Yale, in 1992, is there most weekends. That day, she and Benoît Pain (camera loader, “Le Divorce”), both in black-and-white striped Breton shirts, made lunch, as Ivory directed (“Have we started the asparagus?”). The group ate around a table in a sunny, windowed porch bursting with geraniums.

“Led by the maestro—the captain of our ship,” Chung said.

“I invented this pepper soup,” Ivory said. It was a bright-red purée. “But Melissa, and Benoît, too, knows all about hollandaise.”

This year, Ivory had a hand in another gay coming-of-age romance—“Call Me by Your Name,” directed by Luca Guadagnino. Ivory adapted the screenplay from the novel by André Aciman, in which Elio (Timothée Chalamet), seventeen, is wary of, then attracted to, Oliver (Armie Hammer), a twenty-four-year-old scholar who’s assisting Elio’s professor father at the family’s Italian villa for the summer. The film has the Italian-countryside pleasures of “A Room with a View,” and mirrors that and “Maurice” ’s journeys from awkwardness to connection and joy. But it’s also set in the eighties—so, like Clive, our hero’s first love marries a woman and breaks his heart.




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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2017, 06:16:38 pm »




....Call Me By Your Name  was made with real love, with good intentions, with a clarity of heart and purposeful, unpretentious intellect. That shows in every frame. Call Me by Your Name  is a true stunner. It’s sexy and sad and funny. It’s Italy, it’s summer, it’s food, it’s family. It’s lust and shame and hope and resignation. It’s life, messy and brilliant.





SUNDANCE 2017
The Gorgeous
Call Me by Your Name
Makes Sundance
Swoon


Luca Guadagnino’s adaptation of a modern gay classic is a wonder.


by RICHARD LAWSON
JANUARY 23, 2017 1:04 PM







Thank God for the Italians. Four days into what had been feeling like a less-than-thrilling Sundance Film Festival—marred, of course, by real-world events—along came a film of such dizzying beauty and rich, genuine feeling that if I were to go home today, I would still call the whole festival a success. That film is Call Me by Your Name, an adaptation of the 2007 André Aciman novel that is something of a modern classic of gay literature. Directed by Italian dream weaver Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash), the film is a swirling wonder, a film about coming of age, about the secrets of youth, the magic of summer, the beauty of Italy. As a steady and unrelenting snow descended on Park City, Call Me by Your Name  kissed Sundance with light and warmth.

Which may sound a little purple, a little tumescent—but this movie inspires such sentiment. Guadagnino has created something of such texture, such power that it’s hard to talk about it in less than hyperbolic terms. First, I’ll tell you what it’s about. Timothée Chalamet, from Homeland  and Miss Stevens, plays Elio, a smart, earnest, precocious kid living an odd and lovely kind of life in the summer of 1983. His parents—fabulously played by Amira Casar and Michael Stuhlbarg—are international academics, spending summers at a villa in Northern Italy that Elio’s mother inherited. Living in a (at least) trilingual household full of books and discussion about said books, Elio is intellectually beyond-his-years, a confident and curious kid who nonetheless feels woefully ignorant, or inexperienced, in one crucial field.

It’s summer, and Elio is 17, so obviously that field is love and sex. Elio is handsome, a beanpole topped with a thicket of dark curls, so he’s got the interest of some French girls staying nearby. He’s interested in them too, but is not pulled to them in the same way that he’s drawn inextricably to Oliver, the 20-something grad student boarding at Elio’s family’s house while he works with Elio’s father. Oliver is played by Armie Hammer, that Ken doll colossus who here uses his ludicrous proportions and chiseled handsomeness to great, surprisingly witty and sensitive effect. Elio’s attraction to Oliver—and Oliver’s to Elio—is laid out delicately by Guadagnino, who adapted Aciman’s book with Walter Fasano and none other than __James Ivory __ (whose Maurice  is nodded to throughout). The film’s pacing is fluid but helter-skelter, long and considered takes suddenly giving way to ecstatic short bursts.

Which is a pretty good approximation of the rhythms of memory, of adolescent desire, of summer’s intoxicating spell. Call Me By Your Name is narrative in that it tells the short, bittersweet story of Elio and Oliver, but it is more a terrarium of human experience, a sensory immersion that is remarkably full in its vision. Guadagnino fills every scene with life—people, insects, plants. Each shot is busy with existence, but Guadagnino does not overwhelm. Working with cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, Guadagnino gives Call Me by Your Name  the faded vibrancy of an old postcard, of a treasured memory. There’s a gentleness, a quietness tempering all the intense surges of feeling rippling between Elio and Oliver. It’s an exquisitely composed film, blessed by terrific performances and perfectly scored by a selection of classical compositions and a pair of new songs by Sufjan Stevens. (Yes, on top of everything else, there’s new Sufjan Stevens music too.)

There’s so much to gush about in this movie, and I’m sure many fans of the book, gay or otherwise, are dying to know whether the movie “goes there” in terms of one particular sexy scene. (It both does and doesn’t.) But in the interest of brevity, I’m just going to zero in on my favorite two things about the film. First is Chalamet’s performance. A 21-year-old La Guardia [high school] alum, Chalamet has the bearing of a natural; he’s deeply committed to his character but also infuses Elio with something of himself, too, as the best movie stars do. Chalamet seems to know that he’s got an innate charm, a boyish grace, and he uses that to striking effect. Elio, soulful and impetuous and a little bratty, is a kid you’ve known, a kid you wanted to be, a kid you care and root for. It’s a mature and thoughtful performance, and it augurs great things for Chalamet going forward. Hell, the tremendous extended final shot of the film would be an acting opus for someone twice or three times his age. Call Me by Your Name  is not Chalamet’s first piece of work (watch Miss Stevens  on Netflix), but it feels in every sense like a grand debut.

The other thing I really love about Guadagnino’s film is the way it captures something I might have a hard time explaining. It’s the film’s rendering of what it feels like to be a teenager living in many worlds at once. Meaning, we see Elio alert and interested when interacting with his parents and their friends—he’s a sophisticated kid who’s used to the company of grown-ups. But we know, of course, that something more primal is happening to Elio, something consuming and huge—the particular atomic weight of that one special summer I hope we all had—that he will not tell his parents about (not yet, anyway). So, Elio must act as if nothing is happening while everything is happening, a perhaps universal teenage balancing act, a dance between inner and outer lives, which is really hard to communicate on film. But Guadagnino and Chalamet figure it out, and Call Me by Your Name  becomes a coming of age film—and absolutely a coming-out film—that replaces more familiar smarm and canned lesson-learning with something deeply sincere, kind, and perceptive.

That kindness, that sincerity, that wisdom is no better represented than in a monologue given by Stuhlbarg toward the end of the film. Stuhlbarg delivers it with such compassion, such humanity, and Guadagnino knows to film it in an unfussy way. In the scene, Elio’s father essentially offers his son a philosophy for living, stressing the importance of letting pain exist next to joy. It’s a remarkably comforting, empathetic, simple (and yet not simple at all) bit of insight, one we could all use. That Guadagnino essentially makes this the emotional climax of his film (not quite, but almost) indicates to me that Call Me By Your Name  was made with real love, with good intentions, with a clarity of heart and purposeful, unpretentious intellect. That shows in every frame. Call Me by Your Name  is a true stunner. It’s sexy and sad and funny. It’s Italy, it’s summer, it’s food, it’s family. It’s lust and shame and hope and resignation. It’s life, messy and brilliant.




« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 08:49:11 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2017, 06:46:24 pm »







Luca Guadagnino, director of the visionary, modern classics I Am Love and A Bigger Splash  (which is in theaters now) is filming his next movie right now and one that is sure to stir up controversy and probably a few other things. Based on the book by André Aciman' Call Me By Your Name  tells the story of 17-year old Elio (played by Timothée Chalamet, who is 20), the only child of an American-Italian family, whose family take in a 24-year old American scholar named Oliver (played by Armie Hammer, 29) while in Italy. Oliver’s stay is meant to be to help Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg) with his work in Greek culture but soon the two young men become intensely attracted to each other and a summer of danger and passion ensues in this 1980s-set coming of age drama.

The screenplay was co-written by Guadagnino, Walter Fasano and James Ivory – the Oscar-nominated director of Howard’s End  and as well as the seminal gay masterpiece Maurice. The film is being co-produced by Frenesy Film Company and Water’s End Productions.



http://awardswatch.com/2016/05/31/luca-guadagninos-call-me-by-your-name-starring-armie-hammer-and-timothee-chalamet/





« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 08:44:48 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek » Logged

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"
Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2017, 06:55:13 pm »













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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
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Aloysius J. Gleek
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« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2017, 09:31:37 pm »

http://www.vulture.com/2017/08/all-the-gifs-you-need-from-the-call-me-by-your-name-trailer.html



LONGING

All the Unbearably Intense Sexual-Tension GIFs
You Need From the Call Me by Your Name Trailer


By Jackson McHenry
August 1, 2017 12:15 pm



Oh, my. Photo: Sony Pictures Classics’




Today, we got the trailer for Call Me by Your Name, the standout gay romance that premiered at Sundance about Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet giving each other significant glances in Italy. The film is based on the novel by André Aciman, directed by A Bigger Splash’s Luca Guadagnino, and written by Merchant Ivory’s James Ivory. But enough about the details of the film: What we’re here to discuss today is the sexual tension on display in the trailer, for it is a thing of true beauty and delight, and a perfect opportunity to make GIFs — lots of them. The next time you consider using something as crude as a winky face or eggplant emoji, consider sending one of these refined creations instead.






Let’s start things off with some light gazing across the room, as Oliver (Hammer) admires Elio (Chalamet) fingering the ivories.






If you haven’t read Call Me by Your Name, I’m not going to say what happens with a peach. But rest assured: Stuff happens with a peach.






That face when someone mentions knots.






You have my attention.






It’s always a sign when guys are really into the Greeks.






Time to get serious — like, “going from playing a kid in Homeland to starring in a romantic drama based on a book” serious.






Gaze longingly at me across a stretch of greenery on a hot Italian summer day in a way that makes me question my sexuality and spurs me on a journey of self-discovery I will reckon with throughout the rest of my life, daddy.






I’m pretty sure this GIF is somehow actually a Sufjan Stevens lyric.






Hello.


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« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2017, 10:39:32 pm »

I agree--it's stunning!
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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  The World Beyond BetterMost  |  The Culture Tent (Moderator: Sheriff Roland)  |  Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017) « previous next »
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