Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 240536 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Like so many classic love stories, this one unfolds with the suspense of a thriller. Will Elio's passion ever be reciprocated by the one he worships? If it is, will they leap over fear and taboo to consummate their desire? And if they do, will they be exhilarated or repelled by that consummation? They have only six weeks to find out.





http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/21/AR2007032102069.html




Love That
Knows No
Boundaries

By Charles Kaiser
Thursday, March 22, 2007



André Aciman


CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
By André Aciman
Farrar Straus Giroux. 248 pp. $23



If you have ever been the willing victim of obsessive love -- a force greater than yourself that pulls you inextricably toward the object of your desire -- you will recognize every nuance of André Aciman's superb new novel, "Call Me by Your Name."

The story unfolds in the spacious home of an academic who hosts a new student every year on the Italian coast, near Genoa. One summer's visitor is a charming 24-year-old American named Oliver, the kind of person for whom everything seems effortless: "He was okay with being Jewish . . . He was okay with his body, with his looks, with his antic backhand, with his choice of books, music, films, friends." The servants are as beguiled by him as the professor and his wife. Only one member of the household is paralyzed by his arrival: the professor's 17-year-old son, Elio.

This boy is also the book's precocious narrator, and he is quick to recognize the nature of his predicament: "I was afraid when [Oliver] showed up, afraid when he failed to, afraid when he looked at me, more frightened yet when he didn't." Elio immediately decides that he and Oliver are soul brothers: "I liked how our minds seemed to travel in parallel, how we instantly inferred what words the other was toying with but at the last moment held back." But he is tormented by the mystery of exactly where their connection will lead them -- and the reader quickly comes to share the intensity of his curiosity.

Like so many classic love stories, this one unfolds with the suspense of a thriller. Will Elio's passion ever be reciprocated by the one he worships? If it is, will they leap over fear and taboo to consummate their desire? And if they do, will they be exhilarated or repelled by that consummation? They have only six weeks to find out.

The boys' stratagems of avoidance and entrapment (often indistinguishable from each other) unfold inside an exceptionally literate household. Aciman has perfect pitch for everything from the beauty of the languid Italian countryside to the perils of unbridled adolescent passion: "I wanted him dead . . . so that if I couldn't stop thinking about him and worrying about when would be the next time I'd see him, at least his death would put an end to it. I wanted to kill him myself, even, so as to let him know how much his mere existence had come to bother me . . . I didn't know what I was afraid of, nor why I worried so much, nor why this thing that could so easily cause panic felt like hope sometimes and, like hope in the darkest moments, brought such joy, unreal joy, joy with a noose tied around it."

At the dinner table, the boys compete to hide their passion beneath their erudition. The conversation ranges from an explanation of Haydn's "Seven Last Words of Christ" to the etymology of the word "apricot."

The book is explicit without ever being prurient, and the feelings the narrator describes are both homoerotic and universal: "Are 'being' and 'having' thoroughly inaccurate verbs in the twisted skein of desire, where having someone's body to touch and being that someone we're longing to touch are one and the same, just opposite banks on a river that passes from us to them, back to us and over to them again this perpetual circulation where the chambers of the heart, like the trapdoors of desire, and the wormholes of time, and the false-bottomed drawer we call identity share a beguiling logic according to which the shortest distance between real life and the life unlived, between who we are and what we want, is a twisted staircase designed with the impish cruelty of M.C. Escher . . . He was my secret conduit to myself -- like a catalyst that allows us to become who we are, the foreign body, the pacer, the graft, the patch that sends all the right impulses, the steel pin that keeps a soldier's bone together, the other man's heart that makes us more us than we were before the transplant."

Almost 60 years ago, Gore Vidal published "The City and the Pillar." Although Vidal has always eschewed the word, the novel's characters advanced the argument that "gay" describes an act rather than a person. The protagonists of Aciman's novel do that more convincingly that anyone Vidal ever created. The beauty of Aciman's writing and the purity of his passions should place this extraordinary first novel within the canon of great romantic love stories for everyone.




Charles Kaiser is the author of "The Gay Metropolis," which will be published in an updated edition this summer (2007)






Also see:





In a first novel that abounds in moments of emotional and physical abandon, this may be the most wanton of his moves: [André Aciman's] narrative, brazenly, refuses to stay closed. It is as much a story of paradise found as it is of paradise lost. (....) Nobody gets clocked with a tire iron. No one betrays the other.







Even the fate of mundanely inanimate things like a ripe peach or a pair of worn bathing trunks become sweetly perverse yet spellbinding in Aciman’s approach of storytelling. Trust me when I say that after reading this book, you will never look at peaches or swimming trunks in the same way ever again.





« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 07:13:43 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy


by @sirayy


"You okay?"

"Me okay."

There was absolutely nothing to say. With my toes, I reached over to his toes and touched them. Then, without thinking, I slipped my big toe in between his big toe and his second toe. He did not recoil, he did not respond. I wanted to touch each toe with my own. Since I was sitting to his left, these were probably not the toes that had touched me at lunch the other day. It was his right foot that was guilty. I tried to reach it with my right foot, all the while avoiding touching both his knees, as if something told me knees were off bounds.

"What are you doing?" he finally asked.

"Nothing."



Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer





CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy




Sep 7, 2017 1:05 AM 11 Notes, 243 Likes

Fan Art / Digital Art / Drawings / @sirayyg
#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva  #laterpeaches 🍑
#andré aciman  #armie hammer  #timothée chalamet  #luca guadagnino
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #artwork #artist #digital art #digitalart
#digitalpainting #fanart #fanartdigital






« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 08:11:49 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy


by @sirayy


He got under the covers too and, before I knew it, started to undress me. I had worried about how I'd go about undressing, how, if he wasn't going to help, I'd do what so many girls did in the movies, take off my shirt, drop my pants, and just stand there, stark-naked, arms hanging down, meaning: This is who I am, this is how I'm made, here, take me, I'm yours. But his move had solved the problem. He was whispering, "Off, and off, and off, and off," which made me laugh, and suddenly I was totally naked, feeling the weight of the sheet on my cock, not a secret left in the world, because wanting to be in bed with him was my only secret and here I was sharing it with him.


Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer






CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy




Sep 8, 2017 2:34 AM 13 Notes, 265 Likes

Fan Art / Digital Art / Drawings / @sirayyg
#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva  #laterpeaches 🍑
#andré aciman  #armie hammer  #timothée chalamet  #luca guadagnino
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #artwork #artist #digital art #digitalart
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« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 08:12:18 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy


by @sirayy


When he came down for breakfast he was wearing my bathing suit. No one would have given it another thought since everyone was always swapping suits in our house, but this was the first time he had done so and it was the same suit I had worn that very dawn when we'd gone for a swim. Watching him wearing my clothes was an un-bearable turn-on. And he knew it. It was turning both of us on.


Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer






CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy




Sep 21, 2017 6 Notes, 410 Likes

Fan Art / Digital Art / Drawings / @sirayyg
#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva  #laterpeaches 🍑
#andré aciman  #armie hammer  #timothée chalamet  #luca guadagnino
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #artwork #artist #digital art #digitalart
#digitalpainting #fanart #fanartdigital

















The Semiotics of the Bathing Suit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semiotics










CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
https://twitter.com/CuZn34

by @CuZn34



He had, it took me a while to realize, four personalities depending on which bathing suit he was wearing. Knowing which to expect gave me the illusion of a slight advantage. Red: bold, set in his ways, very grown up, almost gruff and ill-tempered--stay away. Yellow: sprightly, buoyant, funny, not without barbs--don't give in too easily; might turn to Red in no time. Green, which he seldom wore: acquiescent, eager to learn, eager to speak, sunny--why wasn't he always like this? Blue: the afternoon he stepped into my room from the balcony, the day he massaged my shoulder, or when he picked up my glass and placed it right next to me.


Today was Red: he was hasty, determined, snappy.




CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @CuZn34
https://twitter.com/CuZn34


Sep 16 2017 11 Likes

#CMBYN  #CallMeByYourName #elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva #armie hammer  #timothée chalamet
#andré aciman #book  #novel  #luca guadagnino #film  #movie  #movies  #film
#lgbt  #lgbtmovie  #sonyclassics  #oscar
#painting  #art  #artist  #fanart  #twitter
#laterpeaches  #🍑
#Red
#later!



« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 08:12:57 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 10:51:07 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Sufjan Stevens

Luca Guadagnino for Fantastic Man Magazine No. 26 (Amsterdam)




Have you met him (Sufjan Stevens)?

"I wrote to him and invited him over to my house to see the film
when it was finished, as he was coming to Italy anyway. So, the
doorbell rings, and this stunningly beautiful man is at the door.
I mean, I’d seen pictures of him, but in reality he is beyond
handsome! Those eyes!
"













Sufjan Stevens’ latest album, Carrie & Lowell, was a beautifully simplistic work based on his mother’s death and his reeling emotions of anger, abandonment, loss and love. It will be very interesting to see Stevens tackling a film score, as most of his work is so broad in scope that it lends itself to a cinematic format. So everything should translate well, but it’s exciting to see him fully embrace the format.




https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/01/sufjan-stevens-scores-indie-film-call-me-by-your-n.html

Sufjan Stevens
Scores Indie Film
Call Me by Your Name

by Pete Mercer
January 9, 2017, 12:05pm



Sufjan Stevens scores Call Me by Your Name



Sufjan Stevens, singer/songwriter and creator of the (overly) ambitious 50 States Project, has written and performed the soundtrack for new indie film Call Me by Your Name.  The film stars Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet and Michael Stuhlbarg, and is based on André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same name.

Directed by Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino, the film follows the love affair between a 24-year-old American scholar visiting Italy, and the 17-year-old Jewish-American boy whose family provides housing for the American while he helps the young boy’s father revise book manuscripts. The film takes place in the 1980s along the Italian Riviera, so expect some really lovely Italian scenery, accompanied by Stevens’ often beautifully melodic music.

Stevens’ latest album, Carrie & Lowell, was a beautifully simplistic work based on his mother’s death and his reeling emotions of anger, abandonment, loss and love. It will be very interesting to see Stevens tackling a film score, as most of his work is so broad in scope that it lends itself to a cinematic format. So everything should translate well, but it’s exciting to see him fully embrace the format.

There is no formal release date for the soundtrack or the film, which hits Sundance on Jan. 22.



FYI: Call Me By Your Name premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and opens on November 24.







To accompany the classical music is a trio songs from the aforementioned Sufjan Stevens, two of them original. Along with employing a new ethereal piano arrangement of “Futile Devices” in a moment of longing, the original songs have the feel of tracks off Carrie & Lowell, albeit with more of a wistful elation. For one of these songs, Guadagnino utilizes one of his few overt directorial flourishes: the effect of a film burn as a lonely Elio contemplates furthering their relationship, then later the visualization of a camera negative when he reflects on the time they have had. Both are fleeting flourishes, appearing only for a few seconds, but indelibly convey the passion inside Elio’s soul.

A feat of accentuated sound design, as hands run down staircases and across bodies, and arresting cinematography, luxuriating in the beauty of Italy and those that occupy it, Call Me By Your Name  has the effect of being transported to this specific time and place. It’s a film of overwhelming empathy and playfulness as loneliness turns into gratification and desires are slowly manifested into reality.








“I have loved you for the last time,” Sufjan Stevens sings in his original song “Visions of Gideon” in
Call Me By Your Name. It’s a moment of both bittersweet happiness and a farewell to a passion that
won’t be replicated again for Elio as he knows his relationship with Oliver is over after his six-week stay.






[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kss6WHJrWX0[/youtube]
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (2017)
Mystery of Love
Sufjan Stevens
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet
Published on Aug 8, 2017






[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2dNTjE6ItI[/youtube]


CALL ME BY YOUR NAME  Soundtrack
Futile Devices - Sufjan Stevens

Published on Jul 27, 2011







« Last Edit: September 28, 2017, 01:51:29 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANMERCH
http://lito-and-hernando.tumblr.com/
https://callmebyyourname-movie.tumblr.com/






My 'little white lies' magazine finally arrived!!!
Beyond happy rn!!!
























Elio and Oliver in the Perlmans' Italian summer villa

Illustration by Yann le Bec for @LWLies 71
(aka their Call Me By Your Name  issue)

Call Me By Your Name@CMBYNmovie Sep 6

https://twitter.com/CMBYNmovie/media
https://twitter.com/LWLies







Little White Lies 71: The Call Me by Your Name issue

Little White Lies 71: The Call Me by Your Name issue

£6.00 - On Sale

Little White Lies 71: Call Me by Your Name

In this issue…

Invisible Touch
A conversation with Call Me By Your Name director Luca Guadagnino about how to capture love on film.

Love My Way
Call Me By Your Name stars Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet discuss life and love, while we meet up-and-coming French actor Esther Garrel.

First Love
Twelve tall tales of formative movie love from a selection of cinephiles.

Eat a Peach
How fruit and sex have overlapped and intermingled throughout the history of art, literature and culture.

Threads #3
Men’s swimming trunks are placed under the microscope in our column about fashion and film.

Extra Assignments
Three short movie appreciations of A Room With a View, A Nos Amours and A Day in the Country, each intended as vita supplementary viewing for our cover film.

Interviews...

Jane Goldman talks about her intricate writing process ahead of the release of Kingsman: The Golden Circle and The Limehouse Golem; Andy Serkis talks up his beautiful directorial debut, Breathe; Eliza Hittman previews her Brooklyn-set gay coming-of-age drama Beach Rats; and Emily Beecham discusses her breakthrough role in Daphne.

Plus…

Filles de Belle
Belle de Jour is 50 years old this year, and so Caroline Golum recounts the joys of this salacious classic.

Shudders of Pleasure
In praise of Clive Barker and the movie he’ll always likely be remembered for, the S&M-flavoured suburban gore aria, Hellraiser.




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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This is a great, great interview!

LUCA, I LOVE YOU!

 :D :-* :D :-*









[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybvPdWLQs6I[/youtube]


CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
TIFF 2017 - COLLIDER Interview
Luca Guadagnino
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet
with interviewer Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub of
COLLIDER

Published on Sep 19, 2017








Director Luca Guadagnino
Reveals His First Cut of
‘Call Me by Your Name’
Was 4 Hours Long
BY STEVE 'FROSTY' WEINTRAUB
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017



While at this year’s Sundance Film Festival,  I saw one film that absolutely floored me in every possible way and is still my number one film of the year: director Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name. Featuring a fantastic screenplay by Guadagnino and James Ivory, powerful performances from the entire cast, amazing cinematography by Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, and brilliance from every other department, Call Me by Your Name  is one of those rare films where everything is just perfect and you walk out of the theater remembering why you love movies.

If you haven’t yet heard of the film, based on the novel by André Aciman, the coming-of-age drama stars Timothée Chalamet (Interstellar) as a precocious 17-year-old American-Italian boy who’s on summer vacation with his family at their Italian villa. When a charming American scholar (Armie Hammer) comes to work with the boy’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg), a summer romance sparks that awakens feelings of first love, brilliantly and sensually captured by Guadagnino. Trust me when I say you need to see this film when it’s released in North America on November 24th. For more on read Adam Chitwood’s glowing review at Sundance (scroll below).

While at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) I got to sit down with Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet and Luca Guadagnino for an exclusive video interview. They talked about if they had any idea the reviews would be so positive and enthusiastic, how they managed to make the movie feel authentic and real, and that even though Guadagnino normally takes a long time to edit his movies this was done in record time. However, the big surprise of the interview was Guadagnino revealing he had a version of the film that was four hours long! After you see the movie you’ll understand why I was so excited to hear about the existence of an extended cut.

Check out what they had to say in the player above and below is exactly what we talked about.


Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet and Luca Guadagnino:


--Did they have any idea while they were making the movie that the reaction would be so positive and enthusiastic?

--The film feels authentic and real. Was it all in the script? Was it found during the rehearsal process?

--What did Guadagnino learn from early screenings that impacted the finished film? Talks about how he usually spends a long time editing his films but he cut this one in record time.

--He reveals he originally had a 4 hour cut of the film!






ALSO SEE:






It must be said that Call Me by Your Name  is a triumph in every regard. Michael Stuhlbarg’s role as Elio’s father isn’t necessarily a large role in terms of screentime, but he delivers a monologue towards the end of the film that felt like it made time stop. Luca Guadagnino and James Ivory’s script is measured and tight; thoughtful and delicate. Every inch of this movie is expertly crafted, right down to the stunning final shot. It’s at once a universal story of young love and a relatable, emotional story of a homosexual awakening. In that regard it’s a tremendous love story period, but also a winning entry in the legion of queer cinema.


http://collider.com/call-me-by-your-name-review/




Sundance 2017
Call Me by Your Name
Sundance 2017 Review
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet
Astound in Sensual Triumph

by ADAM CHITWOOD
Monday 23 January 2017



Days filled with swimming, reading, and eating fresh fruit ... Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




In my four years attending the Sundance Film Festival, I’m not sure I’ve seen anything as purely rapturous as Call Me by Your Name.  The new feature film from I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash  filmmaker Luca Guadagnino chronicles a summer romance that blossoms between a young boy and a visitor in northern Italy, and by the film’s end it solidifies its place as one of the queer cinema greats alongside Carol, Brokeback Mountain, and Moonlight.  The film is a tremendously sensual, hypnotic coming of age/coming out tale of first love. Anchored by a phenomenal breakout performance from Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer’s best work yet, and masterful craftsmanship, Call Me by Your Name is an instant addition to the best romances of the 21st century.

Based on the book of the same name by André Aciman, the film takes place in 1983 in Northern Italy, where a 17-year-old boy named Elio is spending the summer in his family’s 17th century villa. His father (Michael Stuhlbarg), a professor of Greco-Roman culture, enlists a research assistant named Oliver (Hammer) to come and spend the summer with his family. Elio is transfixed by Oliver at first sight, but approaches the handsome American warily, keeping him at arm’s length. As the summer continues and Elio and Oliver play a game of chicken, daring one another to make the first romantic overture, the two finally give into their feelings and spark a romance that is passionate, playful, and pure.

Chalamet is nothing short of a revelation as Elio. The actor is probably best known for his work on Homeland  or for a brief role in Interstellar,  but this is one of the biggest breakthrough performances in recent memory. He imbues Elio with complicated layers—a confident exterior; a precocious charm; a fearful undercurrent. All of these shine through and more and he’s so good in the role that at first you even doubt whether he actually likes Oliver. Of course he’s simply preparing himself for rejection by throwing out the first jabs, but this results in a relationship that is at first delightfully contentious, then playfully so before turning into full on flirtation.

But as a closeted 17-year-old, Elio is still working out his feelings by losing his virginity to a local Italian girl who has the hots for him. Their relationship never comes off as phony, more as an exploration, and there’s a ticking clock plot point towards the end of the film that raises the stakes in hilariously sexy fashion.

As the relationship between Elio and Oliver becomes physical, the film really digs into this as a first love story and a coming out story. Love is universal, so the feelings between Elio and Oliver are the same feelings felt by all, but it’s nice that Guadagnino doesn’t ignore the elephant in the room: that Elio and Oliver’s sexuality is a thing to be hidden at that point in time. There’s a reason their relationship began so contentiously, and Oliver makes reference early in the film that he’s “been good” so far and doesn’t want to do anything to mess that up. It’s heartbreaking, really, to see Elio so miserable at the start of the film, surrounded by such beauty.

But this is no misery porn. The teasing that goes on between the two characters is magnificently handled by Guadagnino, who keeps a playful hand on the proceedings so as not to drown the film in self-serious romance. Summer flings are fun! So are first loves. And while this does blossom into something deeply felt, the summer season and Italian setting add a touch of lightheartedness to the scenes. Moreover, Guadagnino’s focus on sensuality over sexuality imbues the film with a romp vibe with an undeniable allure. One imagines that a more explicit or erotic version of the film would have downplayed how deeply felt the emotions are between Oliver and Elio.

Gorgeously shot by Sayombhu Mukdeeprom (Arabian Nights ), this is a film that you just want to soak up. The Italian scenery is milked for all its worth, and the days filled with swimming, reading, and eating fresh fruit are divine. But the secret weapon to immersing audiences into the world of Call Me by Your Name  is some incredible sound design. The footsteps on the gravel roads, the creaking floors in the ancient villa—you not only see this world, you feel it. That only allows the audience to fall deeper into the film’s trance, becoming infatuated with the romance between Elio and Oliver.

It must be said that Call Me by Your Name  is a triumph in every regard. Stuhlbarg’s role as Elio’s father isn’t necessarily a large role in terms of screentime, but he delivers a monologue towards the end of the film that felt like it made time stop. Guadagnino and James Ivory’s script is measured and tight; thoughtful and delicate. Every inch of this movie is expertly crafted, right down to the stunning final shot. It’s at once a universal story of young love and a relatable, emotional story of a homosexual awakening. In that regard it’s a tremendous love story period, but also a winning entry in the legion of queer cinema.

Rating: A


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Wow. Quite a schedule the boys have in the next week to week-and-a-half: London (BFI), Rio (FdR) and NYC (NYFF).   :o :o :o



 anything hammer
                                       ( @anythinghammer )


1:34pm 09/26/2017
2 Retweets  22 likes

#NEW'Call me by your name' will be at BFI London Film Festival in October - Armie and Timmy are confirmed.

http://www.pictame.com/user/anythinghammer/5801238368


And...









Me chame pelo seu nome
Verão de 1983, norte da Itália. Elio Perlman, um jovem ítalo-americano de 17 anos, passa seus dias na vila de sua família, um antigo casarão do século XVII. Seus dias são repletos de composições ao piano e flertes com sua amiga Marzia. Um dia, Oliver, um charmoso homem de 24 anos, chega para ajudar o pai de Elio em sua pesquisa sobre cultura greco-romana. Sob o sol do verão italiano, Elio e Oliver descobrem a beleza do despertar de novos desejos que irão mudar as suas vidas para sempre. Exibido no Sundance Film Festival e na mostra Panorama do Festival de Berlim, 2017.

Call me by your name
Summer of 1983, northern Italy. Elio Perlman, a 17-year-old Italian-American young man, spends his days in the village of his family, an old 17th century manor house. His days are filled with piano compositions and flirtations with his friend Marzia. One day, Oliver, a charming 24-year-old man, comes to help Elio's father in his research on Greco-Roman culture. Under the Italian summer sun, Elio and Oliver discover the beauty of the awakening of new desires that will change their lives forever. Shown at the Sundance Film Festival and Panorama show at the Berlin Film Festival, 2017.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2017, 08:02:58 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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FYI. Yup. I can totally see it.  ::) :laugh: ;)



 Em‏
                                       @antheases


1:34pm 09/26/2017
55 Retweets  194 likes
https://twitter.com/antheases/status/894149839109279744
                                                                                                "armie is more innocent than timmy in real life" -
                                                                                                 luca guadagnino commenting on the actors' age difference
                                                                                          







Omg. Total Innocent!






Armie Hammer for TIFFxHuawei Portrait Studio by Kourosh Keshiri

http://monetsberm.tumblr.com/image/165665126161
http://monetsberm.tumblr.com/
SEP 10 2017
TIFF 17







Armie Hammer for TIFFxHuawei Portrait Studio by Kourosh Keshiri                                                                Timothée Chalamet for TIFFxHuawei Portrait Studio by Kourosh Keshiri
http://athinglikethat.tumblr.com/post/165169531884/armie-hammer-for-tiffxhuawei-portrait-studio-by              http://athinglikethat.tumblr.com/post/165169591044/timoth%C3%A9e-chalamet-for-tiffxhuawei-portrait-studio
https://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/image/165207248832                                                                                 https://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/image/165207233959
https://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/                                                                                                                https://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/
SEP 10 2017                                                                                                                                             SEP 10 2017
TIFF 17                                                                                                                                                    TIFF 17








Luca Guadagnino, Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet for TIFFxHuawei Portrait Studio by Kourosh Keshiri

http://athinglikethat.tumblr.com/post/165169566704/luca-guadagnino-armie-hammer-and-timoth%C3%A9e
https://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/image/165207267181
https://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/
SEP 10 2017
TIFF 17

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"