Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 258874 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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OLIVIER ZAHMA swimming pool is a strong symbol.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — In Hockney’s painting, there’s the tension of the surface and what is beneath the exploding splash in the pool, which is incredibly sexual. I remember the first time I saw it, as well as a second painting with a guy swimming underwater. I was maybe 14. That’s when I began to understand my own sexuality. In a way, I was upset by those paintings. I could hardly look at them because they’re so much about what is below the surface, at a deeper level of desire and sexuality. Hockney questioned this through the lens of his own homosexuality, which really hit me.








http://purple.fr/magazine/fw-2015-issue-24/luca-guadagnino/


purple MAGAZINE
— F/W 2015 issue 24



LUCA GUADAGNINO
on independent cinema
film director

interview and portrait by OLIVIER ZAHM





OLIVIER ZAHM — How did you start in cinema?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I started as a critic. Actually, I started as a cinephile. I always looked at films, lots of them.

OLIVIER ZAHM — What is the first film you remember?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I remember my first impression of a screen, which had nothing to do with the actual film when I was five years old. It was the desert in Lawrence of Arabia, by David Lean — years after the film came out. I was in my mother’s lap, in a big theater in Ethiopia. I’ve always been very enthusiastic about cinema, someone who really lives in it. I always thought about and tried to understand all the threads that make film — cinema history, the relationship to the viewer, etc. So I got a degree in the history of cinema, in Rome.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Rome was the Italian capital of cinema.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Once. It’s totally finished. I think the language of cinema has been greatly lost. I don’t want to sound grumpy or nostalgic, as if it was better then. But the art of cinema has passed away from moving images and people talking and has been replaced by special effects.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Why do you think that the language of cinema has been lost?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — The capacity of a film to interpret reality and create different visions of it for those watching — not simply showing people or emotions, but going further, creating a sort of social consciousness about an issue. That’s what we’re losing. I think it’s a sad moment, compared with what cinema was before. One in a hundred films will now interpret reality through the language of cinema. It’s like painting, which came from the avant-garde, then passed through the crises of the ’60s and ’70s only to return to the figure. Now, there seems to be a kind of nostalgia for cinema to be like the novel. But film was never like a novel. Cinema is made up of images put together with other images to create a related idea. What’s lacking is the interpretation of the void between the images. For example, when Jean-Luc Godard portrayed a couple in a crisis, you saw it through an idea Godard had about the crisis of cinema itself. He tells a simple story of a bourgeois couple, but at a higher level, via deeper meaning, he presents something critical about the form, which back then already engendered feelings about its death.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Your documentary film Bertolucci on Bertolucci is a symphony of interviews with him. There’s a moment, from the ’80s I guess, when Bertolucci, speaking about Pasolini, says that the language of cinema is no longer the language of reality because the language of reality is television. What would be the language of reality today, if not cinema?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — It could be the Internet. But it’s a challenge for myself as a filmmaker: what is my subjective capacity to see reality with eyes wide open, with a mind ready to observe and think like an artist, which in cinema means to get away from the star system and the production of mass divertissement — entertainment.

OLIVIER ZAHM — What do you think about the digital revolution?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — The digital revolution is a great democratic achievement, but it’s fake. The problem is how to be thoughtful within the orgy of image production that increases all around us — which, to be honest, makes me want to stop producing images.

OLIVIER ZAHM — You mean it’s destructive to cinema?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Yes. And to reality — the reality of making images that are worth watching and thinking about. Not just anyone can create an image. I don’t want to be elitist. I think images, and those who make them, should be strongly invested in and reflect and interpret reality, and not simply reiterate the status quo.

OLIVIER ZAHM — I didn’t know Bertolucci started out as Pasolini’s assistant, as I learned in your film. Nor did I realize he was so deeply influenced by him. Aren’t you a very late son of Pasolini?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Thank you. I speak for myself, but it’s important for me, whether I’m working with stars and fashion brands and making fashion films, or simply taking pictures for fun — I’m always aware of what I’m doing in the middle of all this, and I don’t stop being critical.

OLIVIER ZAHM — You like to work in fashion, too.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Absolutely, but my process is always analytical. That has to do with my childhood. I remember being fascinated by things my mother and my Aunt Isabella had — for example, a beat-up old Hermès bag. I was interested in the form and started to become conscious of such things, which is what drew me into the fashion world. But it all comes from fascination. And in fashion I met many inspiring people, such as Raf Simons, Francesco Russo — great artists who bring something beyond the imposition of capital to produce, produce, produce. It’s about form, inventing form, reinterpreting form.

OLIVIER ZAHM — But the fashion world produces nonstop moving images, short movies, videos, of which maybe not even 1% have any relevance.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I agree completely. It’s incredibly sad, but the same pertains to the clothes. What’s the form? What percent of mass-produced clothes makes sense as a silhouette that says anything about us, who we are, and where we are going? Maybe 1%, you are right.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Not a lot, but maybe enough!
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Going back to my roots, even when objects and materials come from the codified world of luxury images, I try to frame them in a perspective of reality. I don’t know if I succeed, but I don’t like drama in film. In making a film, the imperative becomes the study. Drama shouldn’t be the center of cinema, as it is for theater. In cinema, we must interpret psychological and exterior realities.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Isn’t your approach to cinema political?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Oh, yeah. Everything is political. Even the false idea that there are no more ideologies, which is extremely ideological, but also cruel because to call an end to ideology suggests that we live in a world with no hope besides well-being and accessibility, which is the purest triumph of ideology. I’m thinking about my next movie, A Bigger Splash, which is about four people trying to escape or go toward one another.

OLIVIER ZAHM — It’s about a community of lovers?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — In a way. Of lovers and haters. What is the language of reality of this film? Is it about privilege? I think it’s about the neuroses of a world in which everything is post-ideological but at the same time hyper-ideological. How do you behave in a world where everything is supposed to be okay, where there is no possibility to confront your ideas with someone else’s? How can you create antagonism and different perspectives where there is none?

OLIVIER ZAHM — Why did you choose to remake a cult French movie, La Piscine, from 1969, which reunited Alain Delon and Romy Schneider. Schneider had dramatically broken-up with Delon and married German director and actor Harry Meyen in Berlin. She had a child; she was out of cinema. Alain Delon asked the filmmaker to book her for this role. The original film is not so good, but you get the true emotions of two people, and it’s in this emotional experience that cinema creates another, possibly its own, dimension.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — That’s exactly it. Its reality isn’t in the drama, or in the constructed idea of love between two characters, but in the past experience of love that Alain Delon and Schneider brought to the screen. They were a famous couple who split up and got back together in front of the camera.That’s one of the reasons for its incredible success in France and Germany. And this is why I also love this film.

OLIVIER ZAHM — But it’s impossible to recreate that situation!
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Absolutely. After I made lo sono L’Amore [I Am Love], I was approached by Olivier Courson and Ron Halpern, from StudioCanal, who were dreaming about reviving La Piscine. I was a bit skeptical because the original, by Jacques Deray, was made during a period when the greatest filmmakers of the Nouvelle Vague were making amazing films, interpreting reality, and questioning the concept of cinema. Deray, who was also the director of Borsalino, among other films, was more into American film noir and French action films or spy films.

OLIVIER ZAHM — But, La Piscine is not a political movie!
LUCA GUADAGNINO — This film was about the typical problems of bourgeois betrayal. I grew up with Jean-Luc Godard and the Nouvelle Vague, but not the commercial films of the ’60s and ’70s. So why should I do a remake of a film that comes from a world that’s so far from me? Of course, behind the curtain of bourgeois betrayal — and murder — there remains universal desire. Which is what? How do you show such basic elements of the emotional subconscious as desire and jealousy? I tried to understand that and asked myself, What’s the desire to kill the father? Or to kill a figure that has been your guide? Not like in the ’60s, when they were trying to kill fathers as a trope of conservatism. The father of today does not censure his son, and gives sons and daughters the permission to do anything he would like to do himself. I wanted to talk about how people today cannot sustain the imperative of jouissance — enjoyment — but must restore a sense of order by killing the father of jouissance. I interpreted that story with four people in a clash of desire. And that’s what led me to a movie that is now completely different from Jacques Deray’s La Piscine. Of course, I borrowed my title from David Hockney, which is completely different.

OLIVIER ZAHM — From Hockney’s painting of a swimming pool and his film about himself, each called A Bigger Splash.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — For me, Hockney still represents the voice of the counterculture.

OLIVIER ZAHM — And the swimming pool is a symbol of unconscious desire, in painting, in movies.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I often put swimming pools in films. In Amore, there’s a swimming pool where a guy hits his head and dies. Here, I wonder if there isn’t something about myself in such an image: I can’t swim. I have a big fear. If you put me into water, I drown. I guess I prefer going toward fear than running away from it.









Ralph Fiennes and Dakota Johnson in A Bigger Splash, 2015, a film by Luca Guadagnino. Photo Jack English






OLIVIER ZAHM — A swimming pool is a strong symbol.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — In Hockney’s painting, there’s the tension of the surface and what is beneath the exploding splash in the pool, which is incredibly sexual. I remember the first time I saw it, as well as a second painting with a guy swimming underwater. I was maybe 14. That’s when I began to understand my own sexuality. In a way, I was upset by those paintings. I could hardly look at them because they’re so much about what is below the surface, at a deeper level of desire and sexuality. Hockney questioned this through the lens of his own homosexuality, which really hit me. So to shuffle the cards, I think Hockney’s great painting is also symbolic of the unconscious representation of homosexual desire — but using heterosexual couples. I tried to put a bit of Hockney’s perverted vision of a surface in a sort of non-straight undercurrent reference to him.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Are you optimistic about the evolution of cinema? From Paris, we have the feeling that Italian cinema in the ’70s was the most beautiful, from Pasolini to Fellini to Rossellini, even compared with the Nouvelle Vague, which was more a statement about cinema.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Not to be nationalistic, but I agree with you.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Those films are richly influential. But it’s also true that Italy has lost its touch in cinema. How do you see the situation, as you’re one of the new names? I’m sure that there are others we may not know of, actually, because Italy’s quite, um…
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Provincial?

OLIVIER ZAHM — You’ve been international from the beginning. You use international actors; you travel; you show your films in New York…
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I don’t consider myself an Italian cinéaste, to be honest.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Are you an African one, as you grew up in Ethiopia?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Hopefully, an African one. I wish I could be considered an Algerian director. My mother is Algerian. I was born in Palermo in 1971, but I grew up in Ethiopia. I came to Italy when I was seven. In my mind, deep emotions and visual landscapes are from Ethiopia and not Palermo or any place in Italy. I arrived in Italy as an outsider, even as a kid, when I went to school and was darker than the average Italian. I was “discriminated” against, as you’d say in today’s world of political correctness.

OLIVIER ZAHM — They were prejudiced against you?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Yeah, yeah. People called me “the nigger,” so I always felt outside the center. That’s why I was so drawn to film. I was very alone. I went to see films alone. I was developing my own sexuality, which in a way was also off-center, and that made me feel a bit outside, too, though not so much. I also strongly recognize and support the civil rights movement, but I’m not an insider of that, either.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Do you support the gay and lesbian movement?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — The Western civil rights movement, like the LGBT civil rights, the right to marry — all that stuff is very important to me, and it’s a scandal that it’s not allowed in Italy, for instance. But I’m not a militant. My entire career, if I can use such a word, has involved being completely independent, to the point that, in 2005, I decided to produce myself because I didn’t want to engage in conversations with the Italian cinema establishment, which might try to dictate my way of making films.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Did you raise money on your own?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I’m a believer that if you want something, as Truman Capote said, you’re going to get it. So I’m really doing it. Yes, I do it.

OLIVIER ZAHM — This is your rebellious side.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — No, it’s my risky side. I like to take risks.

OLIVIER ZAHM — So would you define yourself as an independent filmmaker?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Completely. I work with international actors, film crews, and scenarios, including some from Italy; but I don’t really belong to commecial cinema, or to Italian cinema. Nevertheless, I come from Roberto Rossellini, Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini, Francesco Rosi, Bertolucci, and Bellocchio, and that incredible 25 years of cinema — ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s — created at the highest level, by filmmakers who were inspired by the most remote lands, especially Rossellini and Bertolucci. That incredible legacy has been transformed into the irrelevant cinema we make today. I’ve thought a lot about that and have a couple of ideas. First, the younger filmmakers of this generation, operating in the ’70s, were engaged in the post-’68 idea of overthrowing the old order, using the power of youth in its moment, which of course never lasts. They also thought what they were doing was eternal, so they did not feel the importance of transmitting knowledge. In a way, it was a generation of immensely great but narcissistic artists in the cinema world.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Thinking they could incarnate their youth?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Forever, without thinking that knowledge has to be passed on, at least to continue the evolutionary process.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Didn’t Pasolini do that for Bertolucci, and educate him?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Pasolini did, but when he was killed, it was also killed. They killed the only one who wanted to transmit something to the younger generation in Italy.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Do you have an idea or a personal theory about the murder of Pasolini?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I think the guy who claimed to have killed him did it out of sexual depravity. I think it was a plot, perpetrated against him because he was at the center of Italian culture but very provocative to the system — Pasolini was not a marginal writer — and he was razed from the face of the earth.

OLIVIER ZAHM — So there was no transmission from his generation?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — No transmission from the generation who should have transmitted Pasolini’s ideas. Everything shut down. But the second very important name for transmission was in the ’70s — Roger Corman, the great B-movie filmmaker. Corman directed and produced many films that empowered other young filmmakers.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Such as?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Jonathan Demme, Martin Scorsese, John Milius, to name a few. Knowledge needs to be transmitted; otherwise it dies without evolving. But then there is an industry problem.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Television?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Exactly. Berlusconi came to power in the ’90s, but his influence came when he started national television in the ’80s, which changed everything, empowering the language of television over cinema. Who are the important Italian directors today? They are from the MTV generation more than anything. I don’t know if you’ve seen Paolo Sorrentino’s The Great Beauty or Il Divo, his last film. Those films want to say they come from the Fellini legacy, but they exhibit only a superficial understanding of Fellini, seen through the lens of advertisements, commercials, publicity, and video clips. I don’t think a young audience today necessarily wants fast editing and a camera that does this and that. I think even a young audience wants to see images that tell them something about reality.

OLIVIER ZAHM — About their reality?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Yes. Absolutely.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Are you optimistic that cinema can still be a language of reality?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Well, the Portuguese director Miguel Gomes has made two fantastic films, Tabu and Arabian Nights, which just came out. He spent a year trying to understand where his country stands, and made films that are topically and visually great. That alone is an amazing achievement. So I’m very optimistic. People everywhere think about images and about reality and should be able to make films that use the language of cinema in this unfortunately boring world in which “cinema de papa” still rules.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Do you consider your beautiful documentary about Bertolucci — made of a combination of extracts of interviews — a film?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I do.

OLIVIER ZAHM — So reality takes the form of a documentary film on another filmmaker.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Yes. I mean a documentary can do just that, so long as it’s not the documentary style now taught, which is a kind of reconstructed television documentary. Werner Herzog made some of the greatest films in the ’70s, but his documentaries, such as one about the death penalty, On Death Row, and the one about the grizzly bear man, Grizzly Man, or the one on the Iraq War, are amazing. We should endorse that kind of energy in younger filmmakers. I produced a film called Antonia by a 26-year-old filmmaker, which is about a wonderful Italian poet in the ’30s who killed herself at age 28 and has never been recognized.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Because we’re in such a situation, with so many moving images that don’t mean anything, it’s time to be radical again. In your documentary, Bertolucci says that when he was 23 or 24, making a movie was like writing a poem. Now, 40 or 50 years later, can we still start from there?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Absolutely.

OLIVIER ZAHM — In that case, maybe the connection with the past is not entirely gone.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — That depends on where you are and on the capacity of an industry to recognize it. One of the great recent French films, Alain Guiraudie’s Stranger by the Lake, from 2013, is a beautiful sort of mystery film, set near a lake where a community of gay men go for casual sex and a murder occurs. When a film like that appears at Cannes, has lots of César nominations, and sells worldwide, that’s a radical movie today.

OLIVIER ZAHM — What about the brillant young French-Canadian filmmaker Xavier Dolan?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — I’m a bit suspicious of Xavier Dolan, for one reason: he does too many films. I do not believe in hyperactivity. I like the idea of reflection. I think Mommy, for instance, is a typical post-Almodóvar female drama, shot in the clever, intelligent way of today, with an awareness of the iPhone generation. Is it a gimmick having to do with the tool? Or does the tool affect the way the images are put together? I was very upset when Mommy — what a title! — was awarded the Jury Prize in Cannes. It basically contradicted Godard’s lesson that such an orgy of images is the end of language and then was rewarded for being an orgy of images.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Maybe because it’s a film that celebrates the orgy of images as a new language of cinema for the younger generation born with the Internet?
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Possibly. I guess that makes me a grumpy old man, and maybe Xavier Dolan is right.

OLIVIER ZAHM — Well, you can’t deny the freedom in Mommy, where the tool of his generation pushes moving images beyond cinema — with young people trying to find freedom and escape the family, the mother, as well as superficial love and fake relations. Maybe it’s a typical teenager movie. I use him just as an example of a filmmaker who doesn’t necessarily care about the history of cinema, but who makes a movie that mostly uses the new technology of images in order to tell a story.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Absolutely, but moving forward, would it represent something more than just being an outburst of desire in moving images? I wonder if Xavier Dolan or anyone who does the same is really thinking about what it means to create an image in motion? But maybe I’m wrong. We’ll see!

OLIVIER ZAHM — It’s perhaps a bit extreme to say that cinema was the language of the 20th century, and we have no artistic language for today.
LUCA GUADAGNINO — Possibly. But looking at cinema history is still extremely important today, in a period of confusion.


END




A Bigger Splash is an erotic thriller with a international cast, including Tilda Swinton, Ralph Fiennes, Dakota Johnson, and Matthias Schoenaerts. It opens in 2015.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olivier_Zahm


Olivier Zahm (born September 1963 in Paris, France) is a French fashion journalist, blogger, photographer, and magazine editor. He is the founder, owner and editor of the French fashion and culture magazine Purple




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Playing Oliver, [Hammer] tells me, didn’t come entirely naturally. “I’m not sure I could have done it unless I’d reached a certain level of understanding with Luca. It was really a matter of him beating it all into my thick skull. There were all these kinks and fetishes that I didn’t understand. Like, why does he want to eat the peach? Why does he say ‘Call me by your name and I’ll call you by mine’? If I didn’t understand those things, I wouldn’t have the character.”








https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/sep/28/armie-hammer-call-me-by-your-name-there-were-all-these-fetishes-i-didnt-understand




Armie Hammer on gay romance
Call Me by Your Name
There were fetishes I didn’t understand

by Ryan Gilbey
Thursday 28 September 2017 11.26 EDT



Hammer seems dazed by the uniformly ecstatic notices the film has received, his enthusiasm for discussing Call Me By Your Name
is understandably boundless





Armie Hammer strides in to the press room a few minutes early, catching the eight or nine assembled journalists mid-conversation. There can be no ignoring him. Cartoonishly handsome, with a big square slab of jaw and a grin that arrives a couple of seconds before he does, he is also 6ft 5in tall. “What did I miss, what’s happening, something funny?” asks the 31-year-old actor. Gesturing at a colleague’s bulbous yellow microphone, I explain that I was remarking on its resemblance to a lemon and pointing out that it would have been more fitting if it were a peach. “Ah,” smiles Hammer. “Why do I have the feeling I’m going to be getting this a lot?”

His suspicion is correct. A peach figures only briefly in the rhapsodic gay coming-of-age story Call Me by Your Name, but that hasn’t stopped the scene in question defining the picture in the minds of those who see it. It is Elio (Timothée Chalamet), the precocious 17-year-old son of an American professor, who uses the fruit as a masturbatory aid; his older lover, Oliver (Hammer), who is staying with the family in northern Italy as the professor’s research assistant, merely raises it to his lips afterwards, perhaps contemplating TS Eliot’s question from The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock (“Do I dare to eat a peach?”) or wondering whether it’s going to count as one of his five-a-day.

Though Call Me by Your Name  is deliciously sunny and sensuous, it has a proper sensitivity toward the pain, as well as the pleasure, of first love, as might be expected from Luca Guadagnino, the director of I Am Love and A Bigger Splash. Hammer seems dazed by the uniformly ecstatic notices the film has received. “I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop,” he says, pulling up a chair. Practically the only criticism so far, however, came last month from the actor James Woods, who expressed his disapproval by tweeting: “As they quietly chip away the last barriers of decency. #NAMBLA.” (The hashtag referred to North American Man/Boy Love Association, a paedophile advocacy group.) The next morning, Hammer replied: “Didn’t you date a 19-year-old when you were 60 …?” Miaow.

Hammer is joined by Chalamet, who is 10 years his junior. After all they’ve done on screen, it’s no surprise to see them goofing around and exchanging big, unembarrassed smackers. When asked if he has ever experienced the sort of love chronicled in the movie, Chalamet assumes a wistful tone: “I have, actually. It was the summer I was working with this actor named Armie Hammer …”

Several hours later, I get Hammer to myself. He shakes my hand hesitantly; he is recovering from having recently torn off his pectoral muscle while working out. Indeed, his Instagram feed is a catalogue of injuries and hospital visits, among the snaps of how much legroom he has in first class and assorted portraits of “the Hammily” (as he refers to his wife, the TV host Elizabeth Chambers, with whom he runs a chain of Texan bakeries called Bird, and their two children).

Playing Oliver, he tells me, didn’t come entirely naturally. “I’m not sure I could have done it unless I’d reached a certain level of understanding with Luca. It was really a matter of him beating it all into my thick skull. There were all these kinks and fetishes that I didn’t understand. Like, why does he want to eat the peach? Why does he say ‘Call me by your name and I’ll call you by mine’? If I didn’t understand those things, I wouldn’t have the character.”

When explanations didn’t do the trick, Guadagnino resorted to film clips. For one scene, he showed Hammer a few minutes of Debra Winger in Bertolucci’s The Sheltering Sky : there is a lost look she gives that he felt was well-suited to the scene after Oliver and Elio have had sex for the first time. “I didn’t take it as ‘I want you to do it like this,’” Hammer explains. “It was more: ‘Do you see what’s going on in her head? Do you see her loss and confusion? That’s what I want you to feel. That’s what I think Oliver would be going through. Do you agree?’ I was, like: ‘I really do. Let me see how I can interpret that.’”

Oliver is Hammer’s third gay role, following Clyde Tolson in Clint Eastwood’s J Edgar and the writer James Lord in Final Portrait, but if that represents a risk, no one seems to have told him. “None of my team has ever said: ‘I don’t know if it’s gonna be good for you to play a gay character.’ So I can only assume we are working our way through that stigma,” he says. Then again, he has a history of following his instincts. Though he hails from “old money” (his great-grandfather, Armand Hammer, was an art collector, philanthropist, Republican party donor and head of Occidental Petroleum), he defied his parents’ wishes by pursuing an acting career. Were they angry? “Yeah.” How did that feel? “I was committed and I was prepared to deal with whatever the consequences of that might be. I mean, they weren’t ever not taking my phone calls or anything. I just had to prove to them that my reason for becoming an actor wasn’t so that I didn’t have to carry on going to school.” Did they want him to go into the family business? “Or college, at least, you know?” he laughs.

There was disappointment early on when George Miller’s proposed 2007 Justice League movie, in which he had been cast as Batman, fell apart. Depending on who you listen to, you can blame the writers’ strike, or the fact that Christopher Nolan didn’t want a parallel Batman running around on screen while The Dark Knight was still a going concern. But Hammer’s break came eventually with his dual portrayal of the Winklevoss twins, squaring off against Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network. Left unmonitored, Hammer’s preppy quality can shade into blandness, as it did in The Man from UNCLE and The Lone Ranger, but his choices are usually too offbeat to allow that to happen. He was part of the shoot-’em-up ensemble of Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire (and will shortly be seen fighting subterranean monsters in the same director’s Freakshift), while his bright, Tom Cruise-esque gnashers were hidden entirely as Amy Adams’s aloof husband in Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals.

His enthusiasm for discussing Call Me By Your Name  is understandably boundless but I wonder how the experience of universal acclaim compares with those times when it was withheld. After all, Hammer has starred in two pictures that were, for very different reasons, among the most vilified of recent years. First, he played the title character in The Lone Ranger alongside Johnny Depp as Tonto. Disney shut down production when the budget ballooned; by the time it was back on track, the smell of blood, or rather turkey, was in the air. The idiosyncratic western was never really given a chance by most critics, though the late Philip French called it “handsome, exciting, affectionate” and compared it favourably to Buster Keaton’s The General.

Hammer sighs when I ask him to compare its reception to Call Me By Your Name ’s. “It’s apples and oranges. Different kinds of movies, different kinds of monsters. That being said, this has been terrific, so to be part of a project like this, I’m happy for myself, for Timmy, for Luca…” He goes on to list several other people for whom he feels happy.

Does he have faith that The Lone Ranger will be rediscovered or reclaimed in years to come? “I don’t know, man.” Another sigh. “That’s really beyond my scope of consciousness. I got to make the movie, it was one of the best times of my life. It’s like someone says in Call Me By Your Name : ‘You got to have the experience. Whatever comes after …’” He trails off. Was The Lone Ranger simply too strange to ever enjoy the kind of success needed to justify a $215m budget? All he will say is: “It’s quirky, for sure.” Maybe he’s simply learned to live with the anger he felt when he accused critics in 2013 of deciding “to slit the jugular of our movie.”

The civil rights drama The Birth of a Nation,  in which Hammer played a slave owner, died for entirely different reasons. Its reception at Sundance in 2016, where it was bought by Fox Searchlight for $17.5m, was every bit as positive as the one afforded there this year to Call Me By Your Name. Then details emerged of the 1999 rape accusation against its star and director, Nate Parker. Though Parker was exonerated, his accuser later took her life. What had been a surefire Oscar contender was hastily buried in the light of this revelation. Surely Hammer has some feelings or opinions about the film’s fate?

“I don’t really know because I haven’t followed everything that’s been going on. I haven’t really been reading anything. I’ve been busy. We’ve been kinda doing this thing. I know that we got to make a movie that at the time felt like it was something very important. I don’t even really know what happened. There are people over at Fox Searchlight who are paid to worry about that sort of thing.” He doesn’t exactly say “I only work here”, but the implication is clear. “Actors come in at the 11th hour and we just stand in front of the camera and do our job,” he says. Another big grin – or is it the same one he’s been wearing all along? – and he’s off.


Call Me By Your Name is at the London Film Festival 9-11 October and released in the UK 27 October.

• This article was amended on the 29 September 2017. An earlier version mistakenly stated that it was Armie Hammer’s Russian grandfather, Armand Hammer, who was head of Occidental Petroleum. It was in fact his great-grandfather and he was born in New York, the son of Russian emigres.





AND ALSO SEE:



Luca is BRILLIANT!!

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NQrUgehtr0[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NQrUgehtr0

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME  Talk
TIFF 2017
Luca Guadagnino
Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet

Published on Sep 11, 2017







In the first of three sessions from the Toronto International Film Festival TIFF, the team behind acclaimed gay romance Call Me By Your Name – actors Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet and director Luca Guadagnino – talk to the Guardian 's Benjamin Lee

The movie is based on the book (of the same name) by André Aciman.

Plot: It's the summer of 1983, and precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman is spending the days with his family at their 17th-century villa in Lombardy, Italy. He soon meets Oliver, a handsome doctoral student who's working as an intern for Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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A film that makes you yearn for a love that will hurt you as much as it hurts Elio, Call Me by Your Name  teaches us that there is a deep meaning in the world that’s worth being open to. It also makes it impossible to hear someone say ‘later’ and not associate it with the sweet scent of endless possibility which comes with a great love that didn’t need to last forever to be real; Call Me by Your Name gently teaches us that a moment or a summer is enough and that time and romance are entirely relative.






9 February to 18 February 2017


http://berlinfilmjournal.com/2017/02/berlinale-2017-review-call-me-by-your-name-by-luca-guadagnino/




Berlinale 2017
Call Me by Your Name
Berlinale 2017 Review
Like his last film A Bigger Splash, Luca Guadagnino excels in the creation of cinematic
moments so beautiful and so rich that you want to frame and conserve them forever.


by Hannah Bahl
February 2017



‘One of the most perfect, casually intellectual, liberal families ever to grace the big screen' ... Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet
and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




There are those rare films that suddenly make a very cold Berlinale day feel warm by adding a different colour to life, like a filter on an old polaroid picture. Call Me by Your Name, which is now being shown in Berlin after its premiere at Sundance, is one of them. The film, which is adapted from André Aciman's novel of the same title, is set in a small town “somewhere in Italy in 1983,” where the intellectual family of seventeen-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) have their summer vacation house, and where Elio is destined to fall, ever so gently, into a painfully exquisite love affair.

We arrive in this Italian summer haven where the peaches are ripe and someone is always making pasta, together with the American student, Oliver (Armie Hammer), who will be the summer assistant of Elio’s father, Mr. Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg), an archeologist. After a few casual Heidegger quotes and classical music interludes it soon becomes apparent that Oliver is visiting the summer house of one of the most perfect, casually intellectual, liberal families ever to grace the big screen.

As the minutes fly by, it becomes seemingly impossible not to fall for each of the characters, and the desperate desire to step into the movie to become a part of this family’s cosmos becomes almost unbearable. You end up yearning to read the newspaper with them, sit at the table during one of their endless summer night patio dinners, listen to Elio playing piano or become part of a discussion about the semantics of the word ‘apricot’ in the morning.

Luca Gudagnino creates a world in which reading books and simply being, is enough. By emphasising the smallest details such as Oliver failing to crack an egg at the breakfast table, he gives everything meaning without making it too obviously ‘meaningful.’ As a director he displays a kindness towards the characters reminiscent of the carefully observant camera-style of Richard Linklater in Boyhood. Consequently, Gudagnino shows us that it is the ordinary things that matter and that we have to allow ourselves to take the time to notice them, like the old woman snapping peas in front of a house when the boys ask for a glass of water on the way to the lake.







The importance of paying attention to the smallest details is pronounced by the graceful foundation of Elio and Olivers’ characters. Oliver is the classic American. When he leaves he always randomly and nonchalantly throws a ‘later’ into the conversation, which becomes a running gag over the course of the film. In a sense this ‘later’ is the most fitting personification of Oliver (an outstanding performance by Armie Hammer): with his Ryan Gosling-esque cockiness he implies in his ‘later’ a bittersweet promise that persistently lingers in the air throughout the film.

Elio (an incredibly sensitive portrait by Timothée Chalamet) is quite the opposite of the loud, self-aware Oliver. He doesn’t quite know who he is or what he wants yet. Reading books and writing music, carefully observing the actions around him, Elio looks like a boy who could have fallen straight out of a song written by The Cure. So when Oliver asks him in their first encounter what he’s doing the whole summer Elio’s answer is simple, yet it carries a fierce, dramatic undertone, he replies: “waiting for the summer to end.” This indicates that deep down, Elio already has an idea of what this could mean, however, as with all great love stories, the rules of attraction are not that simple, or surmisable in just one sentence.

Clearly cherishing his ensemble, Luca Guadagnino establishes a level of carefully orchestrated intimacy in the relationships between his characters which makes their care-free existence all the more enticing. Consequently, Call Me by Your Name encourages a deep-seated desire for the internet to collapse so that we can all go back to reading books and become sensual, analogue beings, dancing to ’80s music, instead of just mindlessly swiping left and right.

Like his last film, A Bigger Splash, Guadagnino excels in the creation of cinematic moments so beautiful and so rich that you want to frame and conserve them forever. However, where the beauty of certain scenes felt a bit forced in A Bigger Splash, in Call Me by Your Name Guadagnino manages to create an incredible level of lightheartedness which lifts the film to heights rarely found in modern cinema and which linger with you well after the credits roll. At its best, Call Me by Your Name has a casual effortlessness that hardly feels constructed at all. These scenes never seem to be staged or orchestrated, they simply happen naturally and poignantly, like when Oliver and Elio ride their bikes or spend some time at the pool together.

Finding an endearing rhythm between its visual language and its accompanying soundtrack, Call Me by Your Name employs a smart variety of songs including classical tunes, nostalgic ’80s hits and two compositions created especially for the film by Sufjan Stevens. The importance of the music was explained by Guadagnino at the Berlinale press conference:


“When we were working on the script, we asked ourselves how we could encompass the voice of the book into the cinematic language and we were playing with the idea to use a third person narrator but this didn’t feel quite right. We then decided to use the music as a commentator of Elio’s character and Sufjan Stevens’ approach to emotion is unsentimental and really raw.“


The skill to which he deftly applies musical accompaniment to his film is encapsulated within the use of the iconic track Love My Way  by The Psychedelic Furs. Guadagnino’s use of the track brings to life a feeling reminiscent of the moment when you received your first carefully arranged mixtape from someone who really meant something to you, a feeling perhaps long forgotten.

A love letter to time and to letting things flow at their own tempo, Guadagnino gives Elio and Oliver the space to find each other without rushing them or assigning them to any queer genre film tick boxes. Yes, the first kiss between the characters is clumsy but we empathise with it, understanding that falling for someone and revealing yourself can be a hellishly awkward experience. There is a subtle beauty in letting two people find each other without forcing it. Certainly, the most striking element in the development of these two characters is how Guadagnino allows them to grow and become more aware of themselves, while slowly leading them to each other completely naturally.

This subtlety is further reinforced by the gaze of the camera which is always an accomplice of the two leading males. The camera is on the boys side, something which becomes glaringly obvious in the more intimate scenes in which Elio and Oliver have sex and Guadagnino makes the smart and conscious decision not to show too much – leaving the audience with their own ideas and defining Elio and Oliver’s intimacy as something sacred.

Although the film clearly focuses on the budding romance between Elio and Oliver, the two are supported by a tremendous cast including Michael Stuhlbarg who plays Elio’s father with an intellectual kindness that resembles Robin Williams in Dead Poets Society. He observes without comment, yet you can see that he knows exactly what’s going on at any given moment. This gives his character an underlying grace, and fashions him into a model liberal father.







Indeed, in one of the last scenes in the movie in which he explains during a midnight conversation with Elio why it is always worth falling in love, his performance has the potential to equal Robin Williams’ desk-monologue in Dead Poets. It is this scene that gives Elio the agency to be who he is without having to ‘come out’ and brings home the message that in the end, feelings are not about being gay or straight, they’re about allowing yourself to have compassion for someone else and to make yourself vulnerable.

A film that makes you yearn for a love that will hurt you as much as it hurts Elio, Call Me by Your Name teaches us that there is a deep meaning in the world that’s worth being open to. It also makes it impossible to hear someone say ‘later’ and not associate it with the sweet scent of endless possibility which comes with a great love that didn’t need to last forever to be real; Call Me by Your Name gently teaches us that a moment or a summer is enough and that time and romance are entirely relative.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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We arrive in this Italian summer haven where the peaches are ripe and someone is always making pasta, together with the American student, Oliver (Armie Hammer), who will be the summer assistant of Elio’s father, Mr. Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg), an archeologist. After a few casual Heidegger quotes and classical music interludes it soon becomes apparent that Oliver is visiting the summer house of one of the most perfect, casually intellectual, liberal families ever to grace the big screen.

As the minutes fly by, it becomes seemingly impossible not to fall for each of the characters, and the desperate desire to step into the movie to become a part of this family’s cosmos becomes almost unbearable. You end up yearning to read the newspaper with them, sit at the table during one of their endless summer night patio dinners, listen to Elio playing piano or become part of a discussion about the semantics of the word ‘apricot’ in the morning.







IF NOT LATER, WHEN?
by billowyblueshirt
                                          Photoset August 26, 2017 354 notes






"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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On how Sufjan Stevens became involved: "I thought a voice that was external, of narration, could be great. I thought, 'why don't we have a chronicler, who opens and closes the movie with a thought of introduction and epilogue?' I thought it would be cool if we had not an actor, but a musician. And I love Sufjan, so I approached him for that. And he said, 'forget about it, it's never gonna happen.' So I said, 'OK, what about a song that can be, in a way, playing like that? A song of a musician of today telling the story of someone back in the '80s?' And then he really surprised us, because a couple of months later, when we were shooting, I got an email from his management. And Sufjan not only made a song, but he made two. And also, he made an adaptation for the piano of his beautiful 'Futile Devices.'"






Sufjan Stevens’ latest album, Carrie & Lowell, was a beautifully simplistic work based on his mother’s death and his reeling emotions of anger, abandonment, loss and love. It will be very interesting to see Stevens tackling a film score, as most of his work is so broad in scope that it lends itself to a cinematic format. So everything should translate well, but it’s exciting to see him fully embrace the format.






To accompany the classical music is a trio songs from the aforementioned Sufjan Stevens, two of them original. Along with employing a new ethereal piano arrangement of “Futile Devices” in a moment of longing, the original songs have the feel of tracks off Carrie & Lowell, albeit with more of a wistful elation. For one of these songs, Guadagnino utilizes one of his few overt directorial flourishes: the effect of a film burn as a lonely Elio contemplates furthering their relationship, then later the visualization of a camera negative when he reflects on the time they have had. Both are fleeting flourishes, appearing only for a few seconds, but indelibly convey the passion inside Elio’s soul.








[youtube=850,475]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVZUBMUekck[/youtube]

Sufjan Stevens "John My Beloved" (Official Audio)
From the album CARRIE & LOWELL


Asthmatic Kitty Records
Published on Mar 30, 2015





John My Beloved

Are we to speak, first day of the week
Stumbling words at the bar
Beauty blue eyes, my order of fries
Long Island kindness and wine
Beloved of John, I get it all wrong
I read you for some kind of poem
Covered in lines, the fossils I find
Have they no life of their own?

So can we pretend sweetly
Before the mystery ends?
I am a man with a heart that offends
With its lonely and greedy demands
There’s only a shadow of me; in a matter of speaking I'm dead

Such a waste, your beautiful face
Stumbling carpet arise
Go follow your gem, your white feathered friend
Icarus, point to the sun
If history speaks of two baby teeth
I’m painting the hills blue and red
They said beware, Lord hear my prayer
I’ve wasted my throes on your head

So can we be friends sweetly
Before the mystery ends?
I love you more than the world can contain
In its lonely and ramshackle head
There’s only a shadow of me; in a matter of speaking I'm dead



I’m holding my breath
My tongue on your chest
What can be said of my heart?
If history speaks, the kiss on my cheek
Where there remains but a mark
Beloved my John, so I’ll carry on
Counting my cards down to one
And when I am dead, come visit my bed
My fossil is bright in the sun

So can we contend, peacefully
Before my history ends?
Jesus I need you, be near me, come shield me
From fossils that fall on my head
There’s only a shadow of me; in a matter of speaking I'm dead



« Last Edit: September 30, 2017, 01:28:03 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The skill to which he deftly applies musical accompaniment to his film is encapsulated within the use of the iconic track Love My Way  by The Psychedelic Furs. Guadagnino’s use of the track brings to life a feeling reminiscent of the moment when you received your first carefully arranged mixtape from someone who really meant something to you, a feeling perhaps long forgotten.






Clearly cherishing his ensemble, Luca Guadagnino establishes a level of carefully orchestrated intimacy in the relationships between his characters which makes their care-free existence all the more enticing. Consequently, Call Me by Your Name encourages a deep-seated desire for the internet to collapse so that we can all go back to reading books and become sensual, analogue beings, dancing to ’80s music, instead of just mindlessly swiping left and right.






It’s a world where the broad-shouldered, blond Oliver fits in nicely. He savagely owns Professor Perlman with his mad etymology skills, breaking down the word “apricot” to its Latin, Greek and Arabic roots. His half-unbuttoned shirt reveals a Star of David necklace, which catches 17-year-old Elio by surprise. (Elio later explains that his mother considers the Perlmans “Jews of discretion” in the sleepy northern Italian vacation village.) At first Elio is annoyed by Oliver, but quickly becomes infatuated. How Oliver feels about Elio is more of a mystery, but as the days and nights continue (so many meals outside! And dancing to the Psychedelic Furs!) the invitations to “go for a swim” eventually turn intimate.






Given Guadagnino’s penchant for lush European settings, it’s unsurprising at how utterly gorgeous this film is to look at, not to mention the 1980’s period setting allowing some choice soundtrack cuts, most notably The Psychedelic Furs“Love My Way“, to provide an additive to the film’s erotic nature; offsetting this is musician Sufjan Stevens‘ original song contributions which play into the film’s fairytale-like mentality.
















[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGD9i718kBU[/youtube]
The Psychedelic Furs   Love My Way
PsychedelicFursVEVO


Love My Way (1982)

There's an army on the dance floor
It's a fashion with a gun my love
In a room without a door
A kiss is not enough in
Love my way, it's a new road
I follow where my mind goes
They'd put us on a railroad
They'd dearly make us pay
For laughing in their faces
And making it our way
There's emptiness behind their eyes
There's dust in all their hearts
They just want to steal us all
And take us all apart
But not in
Love my way, it's a new road
I follow where my mind goes
Love my way, it's a new road
I follow where my mind goes
Love my way, it's a new road
I follow where my mind goes
So swallow all your tears my love
And put on your new face
You can never win or lose
If you don't run the race



Songwriters: John Ashton / Richard Lofthouse Butler / Timothy Butler / Vincent Davey
Love My Way lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC



In 1982, the band was reduced to a four-piece with the departures of Morris and Kilburn, and moved to the U.S. in search of a producer.[6] The band recorded their next album, "Forever Now", with record producer Todd Rundgren in Woodstock, New York. This album contained "Love My Way", which became another UK chart entry, and also their first US Billboard Hot 100 charting single.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Psychedelic_Furs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_My_Way_(song)



By the way--

In the summer of 1983, Elio and Oliver might  have gone to the movies to see--






[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcEchaH6EJk[/youtube]
Valley Girl   (1983)
Modern English   I Melt with You




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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This press conference (back in February)
is very worthwhile to watch/listen--
starts at 13:13 (move your cursor)
Luca is brilliant as ever, always more
than interesting. Fascinating that
Timothée had been connected to the
film for more than three years, visiting
with James Ivory in Claverack, NY!
André has interesting things to say
also re love and--well, take a look!


[youtube=630,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbKE2or_VDk&t=2211s[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbKE2or_VDk&t=2211s

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
BERLINALE 2017  Press Conference
Luca Guadagnino
Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet
André Aciman, Amira Casar
and Producer Peter Spears  

Published on Sep 19, 2017











The (partial) cast and crew of Call Me by Your Name

Front Row: Victoire Du Bois (Chiara) Esther Garrel (Marzia) Timothée Chalamet (Elio) André Aciman (Author--and Mounir)
Amira Casar (Annella) Luca Guadagnino (Director)
Center Back Row: Peter Spears (Isaac--and Producer) and, Far Right Back Row: Armie Hammer (Oliver)

Photo: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images












« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 04:06:39 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Interesting--the last image of Timothée/Elio in Call Me By Your Name
might be inspired be this last scene in Jean Renoir's A Day in the Country ??






Oh! Oh! Oh! This is going to hurt--
[youtube=745,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaRajFYJT2E[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaRajFYJT2E

Jean Renoir at Work: A Day in the Country -- Partie de campagne  (1936)




criterioncollection
Published on Feb 13, 2015
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
https://twitter.com/mellowbeat__

by @mellowbeat__








The stealth and and stubbornness of his caresses sent chills down my spine. A sudden giddiness overtook me. No, I wasn't going to cry, this wasn't a panic attack, it wasn't a "swoon," and I wasn't going to come in my shorts either, though I liked this very, very much, especially when the arch of his foot lay on top of my foot. When I looked at my dessert plate and saw the chocolate cake speckled with raspberry juice, it seemed to me that someone was pouring more and more red sauce than usual, and that the sauce seemed to be coming from the ceiling above my head until it suddenly hit me that it was streaming from my nose. I gasped, and quickly crumpled my napkin and brought it to my nose, holding my head as far back as I could. "Ghiaccio, ice, Mafalda, per favore, presto," I said, softly, to show that I was in perfect control of the situation. "I was up at the hill this morning. Happens all the time," I apologizing to the guests.

There was a scuffle of quick sounds as people rushed in and out of the dining room. I had shut my eyes. Get a grip, I kept saying to myself, get a grip. Don't let your body give the whole thing away.

"Was it my fault?" he asked when he stopped into my bedroom after lunch.

I did not reply. "I'm a mess, aren't I?"

He smiled and said nothing.





Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer





A few scenes from Call Me By Your Name  taken at a premiere, source unknown.
https://twitter.com/badpostchalamet  @badpostchalamet  timothée updates
https://twitter.com/apeachpricot  @apeachpricot






CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @mellowbeat__

https://twitter.com/mellowbeat__


Sept 30 and Oct 01, 2017

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName   #Elio #Oliver  #laterpeaches  #🍑
#elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva
#andré aciman  #armie hammer  #timothée chalamet  #luca guadagnino  
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #artwork #artist #illustration









CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
https://twitter.com/mellowbeat__

by @mellowbeat__



"I was waiting for you," I said.

"I thought you'd gone to sleep.
I even thought you didn't want to."

"No. Waiting. I just turned the lights off."

I looked up to our house. The window shutters were all closed.
I bent down and kissed him on his neck. It was the first time
I had kissed him with feeling, not just desire.
He put his arm around me.
Harmless, if anyone saw.



Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer






CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @mellowbeat__

https://twitter.com/mellowbeat__


August 27, 2017

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName   #Elio #Oliver  #laterpeaches  #🍑
#elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva
#andré aciman  #armie hammer  #timothée chalamet  #luca guadagnino  
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #artwork #artist #illustration




« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 08:08:23 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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 Peter Spears
                                       @pjspears


4:41 PM - 28 Sep 2017
16 Retweets 79 Likes


https://twitter.com/pjspears?lang=en&lang=en
https://twitter.com/pjspears/status/911583278163009539

Oh hey, if you're in NYC October 28th, come see us at this Producers Guild event. Lots of great folks scheduled to speak.

Produced By‏
@Produced_By

https://twitter.com/Produced_By/status/913537560131096576



https://twitter.com/Produced_By

This film could be a breakout title for
@SonyPictures. Producer @pjspears + actor
@RealChalamet talk @CMBYNFilm --
https://buff.ly/2hsnzQM


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"