Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 239573 times)


Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet speak to Gay Times
on the red carpet at the BFI London Film Festival for Call Me By Your Name.





http://www.gaytimes.co.uk/culture/89320/call-me-by-your-name-premiere-stars-right-time/


Exclusive:
Call Me By Your Name  stars
on why the gay love story is timely


by Lewis Corner
15:44 10th October 2017






Although Andre Aciman’s novel Call Me By Your Name  was released 10 years ago now, it feels like its big screen adaptation has come at just the right time.

Directed by Luca Guadagnino, the film is set in 1980s Italy, as 17-year-old Elio (played by Timothée Chalamet) embarks on a summer affair with 24-year-old doctoral student Oliver (Armie Hammer).

It has received critical acclaim ahead of its release, mainly for its powerful portrayal of first love and desire.

Gay Times  caught up with the stars of the film – as well as its director – to speak about the impact it could have on generations of LGBT+ people to come.

“To bring voice to any sort of LGBTQ story is very powerful, because these are stories that don’t get voiced enough,” Timothée told us at the European premiere as part of the BFI London Film Festival.

“Certainly not a story like this one where there isn’t some sort of antagoniser or disease, it’s just a love story.”

The 21-year-old American actor added that its release feels timely in a year when LGBT+ rights and equality feels at threat.

“We’re in an era of intense socio-geographic divide, so to have a film that really is just a celebration of love in a boundary-less form, it feels like good timing,” he said.

Watch the video above to hear more from Timothée, as well as insight from Armie Hammer and Luca Guadagnino.

Call Me By Your Name  will be released in the UK on 27 October, and in the US on 24 November.


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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Sailing delicately between jolting musical transitions and subtle tiptoes toward the forbidden, “Call Me By Your Name” has arrived at just the right time. While nearly every nook and cranny of Western culture is fraught with harshness and judgment, Luca Guadagnino and his cast breezes in, reminding us that love can save the day. What the film accomplishes is nothing short of revelatory, a warm, generous (and long overdue) cradling that steps beyond the LGBT community and high into a universal arena.





https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/call-me-by-your-name-quenches-our-thirst-for-compassion_us_59d68c70e4b08ce873a8cc50



Call Me by Your Name
Quenches Our Thirst For Compassion

by Michael Raver
10 Oct 2017  04:29 pm ET



Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name--Whispers of steamy gay sex scenes and piercing performances from the cast.



When it premiered at The Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, Luca Guadagnino’s gorgeous drama, “Call Me By Your Name” sent droves of moviegoers into a ravenous frenzy anticipating its wide release. There were whispers of steamy gay sex scenes and piercing performances from the cast. All of this was proven to be true for audiences at The Berlin Film Festival in February and now the recent screening at the New York Film Festival has excited another wave of titillated new fans.

Based on the acclaimed 2007 novel of the same name by André Aciman, it’s the coming-of-age story of 17-year-old Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet), a musical prodigy who spends the summers on his parents’ Italian villa in the 1980s. When his father (Michael Stuhlbarg) welcomes the brilliant and hunky academic, Oliver (Armie Hammer) to stay for the summer to complete his PhD, the two young men form a passionate bond.

Sailing delicately between jolting musical transitions and subtle tiptoes toward the forbidden, “Call Me By Your Name” has arrived at just the right time. While nearly every nook and cranny of Western culture is fraught with harshness and judgment, Guadagnino and his cast breezes in, reminding us that love can save the day. What the film accomplishes is nothing short of revelatory, a warm, generous (and long overdue) cradling that steps beyond the LGBT community and high into a universal arena. Carefully paced against a heavenly Italian country backdrop, the film champions the ferocity of first love, first heartbreak and the longing over what might have been.








In Conversation with André Aciman

Egyptian-born Author André Aciman, who makes a brief but memorable appearance in the film, has been basking in the joy of seeing his masterpiece transition into a new medium, as well as the excitement of the narrative connecting with a new audience. His eight books, including his latest novel, Enigma Variations, have received vibrant praise from critics.

Are there major differences between the book and the film?

André Aciman: Yes. In the novel Elio and Oliver travel to Rome, and from Rome Oliver leaves for the States. They meet over the years. Many years. But one thing I learned from this movie—and from the way movies must necessarily differ from the written page—is that what matters most is that the emotional and the aesthetic impacts remain consistent. So you don’t need to see the passage of time to understand that something profoundly sad has happened to Elio. All you need to see is a boy staring at the camera while people in the background are setting the table. I was not wrong when I told the producers and the director that the end of the film was more powerful—hence better—than the way the novel ended.

Were you involved in the production at all? Did you have input on the script?

AA: I knew how annoying an author can be to a director and script writer. So I refrained from intruding. I had already had my say with the novel. Now it was their time to have their say. I would have said something, however, if I felt that the film was not faithful to the spirit of the book. But the film was incredibly faithful and consistent. I was very gratified to see that some of the key scenes were lifted almost verbatim from the novel itself.

What was it like seeing your characters enacted on screen? Were there any surprises?

AA: It was simply gratifying. I never felt that they were alien to the book. I never felt that “Gee, this is strange, this doesn’t feel like the story I wrote or the characters I wrote about.” Rather what I kept thinking—and maybe this was tickling to my ego—I can’t believe that the pages I struggled over on the Upper West Side of Manhattan during a very hot and humid summer could have generated this amazingly beautiful film filled with so much longing and beautiful characters.

Michael Stuhlbarg’s character, Professor Perlman, contributes hugely to the resolution of the story. What did you think of his take on the role and his handling of that particular scene?

AA: The father’s closing speech is better in the movie—even I was moved—than in my book.

How do you feel now that the film is starting to get awards buzz?

AA: I feel that the film is fantastic. It’s beautiful without being cloy, it’s bold and frank without being blatant or brazen, and it’s real, real about how love happens, how love alters us, how physical love needs to be, and ultimately how love stays sometimes forever. I couldn’t be happier.








In Conversation with Michael Stuhlbarg

As the star of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire  as well as blockbuster films like Lincoln, Blue Jasmine and Doctor Strange, actor Michael Stuhlbarg has been making his way up the Hollywood ladder with quiet dignity. He’s an actor’s actor. His sensitive and funny turn as Elio’s father, Professor Perlman has, along with the two leads, garnered early awards buzz. “Call Me By Your Name” might be the project that catapults Stuhlbarg toward the A-list stratosphere.

How did this project come to you?

Michael Stuhlbarg: I was sent the script through my agent—and Luca, I was told, was curious to see if I might be interested in the project. I knew of, and was dazzled by his film, I Am Love, had always been a huge fan of James Ivory. I was unfamiliar with André Aciman’s novel, but was immediately drawn into the story—particularly so after learning how Luca wanted to shoot it.

What was the biggest challenge about the role?

MS: I think absorbing all of his given circumstances—a Professor of Latin and Greek scholarship with a passion for Art History and Archaeology, fluent in Italian, suggestions of a regretful past, a doting liberal loving father, generous, playful, who sees his son falling in love for perhaps the first time, a responsible concerned parent who wishes to maintain a respectful presence in his son’s life.

His perception of the relationship between Oliver and Elio is very tender. Why do you feel this is valuable for both the LGBT community (particularly young people) and the world at large to see this kind of parenting in the film?

MS: Perhaps Mr Perlman’s tenderness offers a loving voice of reason and compassion at a time when tenderness, reason, and compassion can be hard to come by. I find him a pure advocate of the human experience, whatever that experience may be for each of us.


Call Me By Your Name will arrive in theaters on November 24th.


« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 04:47:21 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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As for his own career, Luca Guadagnino makes the strange assertion that he has not had success: “I’m 46 and I don’t know if I’ve ever had success. I’ve had recognition which is a balm, it’s nice, you know when you feel sick and you drink something and it makes you feel better, but success, I don’t know. Success has made a failure of our home, it’s a great song, I’m always wary of that song and I always hear that song playing in my ear.” And he starts to sing a line from the song as if it is playing right at that moment as we are chatting.




http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/call-me-by-your-name-luca-guadagnino-armie-hammer-timoth-e-chalamet-tilda-swinton-a-bigger-splash-a8017131.html



Call Me by Your Name
Director Luca Guadagnino on the film
everyone is talking about
Tipped as one of the favourites to win Best Picture Oscar, the Italian director’s new film stars
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, as two boys who fall in love in Italy over the summer


By Kaleem Aftab
@aftabamon

26 October 2017



Armie Hammer as Oliver (left) and Timothée Chalamet as Elio in Luca Guadagnino’s film Call Me By Your Name



Sometimes you never know where the voice of dissent will come from. Call Me By Your Name  has been receiving rave reviews since it debuted at the Sundance Film Festival and is now one of the favourites to win the Best Picture Oscar.

So it was somewhat of a surprise when on the day before I meet with director Luca Guadagnino that James Ivory of Merchant and Ivory fame, and the scriptwriter of Call Me By Your Name, questioned why the Italian director didn’t show male genitalia in his adaptation of American author André Aciman’s novel about the sexual awakening of a 17-year-old in 1980s Italy.

It’s a position that has left Guadagnino baffled. “I am the least prudish director you can meet,” argues the 46-year-old. “I’ve been very precise in using the female and male body on screen to convey all kind of emotions. I thought that the display of nudity in this specific movie was absolutely irrelevant and I understand that for James it would have been relevant but that is his vision, what is clear is that we had no limitations on what we wanted to do.”

When Guadagnino asks, “Did you miss penises in this movie?”, the preposterousness of the whole debate is brought home. Ivory’s problem seems a hangover from the long production history of the film, that saw Ivory attached as director, then co-director with Guadagnino, who was first brought on as a locations manager before eventually taking on the director’s chair, as otherwise the film would not have been made.

But Guadagnino wants to make clear that it’s not the criticism of his film that bothers him, just the argument raised by the critic; “I’m happy to hear any kind of criticism if it comes from a place of intelligence and listening.”

Guadagnino is much happier when conversation reverts to the breakout performance of Timothée Chalamet as Elio, or how Armie Hammer, playing an American student who comes to Italy for a summer, delivers the performance that finally cements the promise he showed in The Social Network  playing both Winklevoss twins, or Michael Stuhlbarg's beguiling turn as an academic.






Luca Guadagnino directing Armie Hammer in his latest film Call Me By Your Name




When I say Stuhlbarg reminded me of a Robin Williams character, the Palermo-born director chips in, “That’s lovely. Dead Poet’s Society.” Guadagnino says he wasn’t thinking about Williams when making Call Me By Your Name, but that “it clearly worked its way in”. He argues that this type of unknowing homage is the secret to his movies; “I think that movies are made from the unconscious of the filmmakers, not out of their ego. A good movie comes unconsciously to me.”

The film is shot in Crema, a city 40 minutes from Milan where Guadagnino works out of a 17th-century palazzo. And he says that as he made the film, he came to realise that he chose the location because unconsciously it fed into memories he had as a young man in the Sicilian capital: “It was like the echo from my dreaming of becoming an individual that was independent from the oppressiveness I felt in Sicily.”

But when I ask if there are elements of his own biography in Call Me By Your Name, he insists that there is not, everything is from the book. “I grew up in Ethiopia for a bit, and when we came back to Sicily I lived in an apartment in the centre of town, I never had a garden. I didn’t have the life you see in the film.”  

His unconscious is clearly full of imagination. The Italian has made his mark in cinema, opera and fashion. As a filmmaker he garnered international acclaim for his extraordinary depiction of a bourgeois Milanese family in Io Sono Amore (I Am Love), made in 2009, starring his muse, the Scottish actress Tilda Swinton. She also starred as a voiceless rock star in A Bigger Splash  (2015). In the high-end fashion world, he has been celebrated for his work making fashion films to go with collections in the luxury sector, starting with Fendi in 2005. Always looking to surprise, and reinvent himself, in December 2011 he made his debut as an opera director with Falstaff at the Teatro Filarmonico in Verona.

He has a motto for his work: ‘You always have to dare yourself, to do things that can sound impossible’. “I say this to all the young filmmakers that want to start their career: otherwise you are not going to hit the mark that you set yourself. Also greatness, it’s not just because of fame, and recognition, it’s greatness of soul. Tilda is a great person because she is open, she listens and she is curious.”

Another big influence on his career and work is Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci. Gaudagnino co-directed a documentary, Bertolucci on Bertolucci, in 2013 and he says that 1900  (1976) was a big influence on Call Me By Your Name. The five-hour-plus movie also features an unlikely and at times sexual relationship between two men, played by Gerard Depardieu and Robert De Niro, but it’s the scenes of the characters as children growing up in fascist Italy that particularly enamoured Guadagnino. The two directors have a strong friendship and when Guadagnino is editing a film, he always sends an early cut of the work to Bertolucci – who he describes as a hard taskmaster – to make comments on.









As for his own career, Guadagnino makes the strange assertion that he has not had success: “I’m 46 and I don’t know if I’ve ever had success. I’ve had recognition which is a balm, it’s nice, you know when you feel sick and you drink something and it makes you feel better, but success, I don’t know. ‘Success has made a failure of our home’, it’s a great song, I’m always wary of that song and I always hear that song playing in my ear.” And he starts to sing a line from the song as if it is playing right at that moment as we are chatting.  

He’s wary also of being overpraised. A student of cinema, he says that he knows that the career of a director is a seesaw, sometimes up and other times down. He doesn’t want to make his decisions through a desire to get glory, rather to make films that would be fun, so that he can say something. He also wants “complete control over my work”.

So that seems to rule out the chances of him making a movie in Hollywood, but he adds: “If Toby Emmerich of Warner Bros would call me and say, ‘Luca, we want you to make a DC character movie and you can do whatever you want, you would have complete control’ – then of course I would be responsible and share ideas with them, but I would need complete control of what is made because then I can perform better.”

His next film, a remake of Dario Argento’s Suspiria, will see him reunite with Swinton for the sixth time, and her A Bigger Splash  co-star Dakota Fanning. When he made Call Me By Your Name, he said he was thinking about how French auteurs like Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohmer and Maurice Pialat, would make the movie, but for Suspiria he is diving off the deep end, “I was thinking how would Rainer Fassbinder make Suspiria...?”


‘Call Me By Your Name’ is out 27 October

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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/0/luca-guadagnino-call-name-didnt-need-nudity-sexy/


Film
Luca Guadagnino on why
Call Me By Your Name
didn't need nudity to be sexy


Robbie Collin, film critic
21 OCTOBER 2017 • 7:00AM



“My theory about Italy,” says the Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino sunnily, “is that it’s intrinsically fascist.” He’s by the sideboard in his Claridges hotel room, preparing a cup of Earl Grey, riffing amicably while the tea leaves stew.

“We were the first in Europe to introduce fascism in the 20th century, the first to enforce racial discrimination by law in 1938, and the first to bring to power a billionaire oligarch – would you like a cup? – a billionaire oligarch who controlled the media.”

As the director of A Bigger Splash, the glittering Mediterranean sex thriller with Tilda Swinton and Ralph Fiennes, Guadagnino knows a thing or two about sinister undercurrents, and and he retires to the sofa, frowning quizzically, cup in hand. “Then later, of course, you have the Polish, the Hungarians, and now the American people with Trump. But we Italians have always been very successful in leading the worst."

Fascism makes an ironic cameo in Call Me By Your Name, Guadagnino's otherwise blissed-out new film, in which Oliver and Elio, a young Jewish-American academic and the 17-year-old son of his mentor and host, conduct a summer-long love affair across northern Italy. When the 46-year-old director was scouting for locations in Lombardy, he spied a glowering portrait of Mussolini in a courtyard. Recalling Jean Renoir's advice to Bernardo Bertolucci – "always leave a door open on set to let reality in" – he rented the place as-was, and wrote into the script an eyebrow-raising encounter of Il Duce.

"There is a strong Italian attraction to the idea that a man of order will save us," Guadagnino suggests, shifting in his seat. He's tall and rangy, with a professorial frizz of hair. "But Oliver and Elio are anything but men of order. They are boys of discovery. So for these two Jewish boys to bump into Mussolini in the height of there love affair, in a place close to where many people were killed" – Lombardy is home to Salò, once Mussolini's seat of government – "felt a bittersweet 'hello' from reality."

If you ever find yourself in a position to confuse real life with a Guadagnino film, count yourself lucky. I Am Love  (2009), his international breakthrough, married Tilda Swinton into a Milanese textile dynasty, then had her beguiled by a hunky chef and his knee-trembling crudiité di gamberi.  Next came A Bigger Splash  (2016), which cast Swinton as a recuperating rock star on an island in the Med, with a young lover (Matthias Schoenaerts) in her bed and an old flame (Fiennes) and his Lolita-ish daughter (Dakota Johnson) in the wings.

A silvery thread of unease often runs through the glamour of his films, but Call Me By Your Name  – an adaptation of an André Aciman novel – is Guadagnino's warmest, best, most open-hearted film yet. For years, though, it wasn't his to direct. He became involved when some American producers who "didn't know how to make a movie in Italy" got in touch. The great James Ivory, of Merchant Ivory, had adapted Aciman's book into a screenplay that he was to direct himself. Guadagnino's interest was picqued. "I was so adament to see a James Ivory movie from this book, because it would have been the movie of a great director in his 80's," he explains, before swerving into an impromptu analysis of his pleasures of "late-period" films. (Guadagnino is a ravenous cinephile, and was a film critic for Il Manifesto  before crossing the poacher-gamekeeper divide.) But when it came to scraping together a budget for Ivory's lengthy shoot, "we couldn't do it," he says.

So Guadagnino, who was used to working quickly, took the helm with Ivory's blessing. After casting the young American actor Timothée Chalamet as Elio, he invited him to stay for a month-and-a-half to get the lie of the land around Crema, where Guadagnino lives in an apartment in a 17th-century palazzo with his partner of 10 years, Ferdinando [Cito Filomarino]. Ten days before filming, Armie Hammer, who plays Oliver, joined them.




https://www.yourcelebritymagazines.com/products/telegraph-review-21-october-2017-karl-ove-knausgaard-luca-guadagnino-niall-horan
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
RELEASE DATES


UK            27 October 2017   
Ireland     27 October 2017   
USA           24 November 2017   
Canada       8 December 2017   
Thailand    14 December 2017   (limited)
Sweden     22 December 2017   
Australia    26 December 2017   
France      17 January 2018   
Brazil        18 January 2018   
Poland      26 January 2018   
Italy           1 February 2018 (Premiere?)
Greece       8 February 2018   
Germany    1 March 2018


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5726616/releaseinfo?linkId=43379176





 Peter Spears
                                       @pjspears


3:41 PM - 4 Oct 2017
5 Retweets 60 Likes


https://twitter.com/pjspears?lang=en&lang=en
https://twitter.com/pjspears/status/915708403888066560

This.




 Armie Hammer Global‏
                                      @ArmieHGlobal


3:23 PM - 4 Oct 2017
29 Retweets 106 Likes


https://twitter.com/ArmieHGlobal
https://twitter.com/ArmieHGlobal/status/915703978368880640


Call Me By Your Name posters in the subway in London




 iana @ LFF‏
                                       @yorgosIanthimos


3:19 PM - 4 Oct 2017
54 Retweets 194 Likes


https://twitter.com/yorgosIanthimos
https://twitter.com/yorgosIanthimos/status/915702858229714945

king’s cross st pancras !!
SHES HERE AND SHES BEAUTIFUL








Meanwhile--
Thailand??
In any case, December 14!




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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Armie Hammer’s work here is better than anything he’s done – it’s witty, compassionate, swaggeringly physical, and never less than fully inhabited. Timothée Chalamet also makes an indelible impression, not least because this 21-year-old newcomer seems so miraculously untutored. And Michael Stuhlbarg, who’s a treasure throughout, gets a fatherly monologue towards the film’s end that’s so observantly and tenderly performed, you can barely catch your breath. It’s one beautiful moment in a film that’s filled with them – gone in a heartbeat, but leaving the kind of ripples that reach across a lifetime.




http://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/0/call-name-review-period-romance-warm-therapeutic-sunlight/


Film
Call Me by Your Name
a period romance as warm and therapeutic as sunlight
★★★★★
by Robbie Collin, film critic
26 Oct 2017  1:50PM



Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name--Oliver arrives at the Perlman family’s villa in a blaze of boisterous glamour.



Elio, Oliver, Oliver, Elio. These two young men are so in tune, even their names laid side by side turn into music. Oliver (Armie Hammer) is an academic in his mid-20s on an Italian field trip. Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is the 17-year-old son of his mentor and host. When Oliver finds him, he’s poised on the cusp of adulthood like a first-time diver on the board, affecting a confidence he doesn’t quite have yet, curling his toes around the quivering brink.

The story of their summer together is the subject of the exquisite new film from Luca Guadagnino, the director of I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash.  It’s an incomparably lovely period romance, as warm and therapeutic as the sunlight that suffuses every frame. The period is the early 1980s – unmissably so, thanks to the shorts, the trainers, and the pop music.

But the setting, described as “somewhere in northern Italy”, is hazy enough to set it a step or two back from the real world, as if we’re watching the flicker of fond memories, or a fairy tale lovingly recalled.

The screenwriter, working from a novel by André Aciman, is none other than James Ivory, and the film rings with all the elegance and passion of the 89-year-old Merchant Ivory co-founder’s very finest work. It’s also Guadagnino’s best to date – teasing, ravishing and just a little arch, but with an open-heartedness that makes you ache.

Bright torrents of piano set the scene – John AdamsHallelujah Junction, the first of many ideal soundtrack choices that also include two new songs by the American singer-songwriter Sufjan Stevens – before Oliver arrives at the Perlman family’s villa in a blaze of boisterous glamour. He’s there to help Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor, archive some documents about Greco-Roman sculpture, and assist with an archeological dig at a nearby lake.

But when his  formidable 6’5” frame first saunters through the door, it’s like one of the statues has swung by in person. He’s a Jewish-American graduate student – a proud one, with a silver Star of David on a chain around his neck – and Elio, who’s Jewish too, but less confidently so, is struck by his easy charm and appetite for life.

At breakfast on the terrace, Oliver devours an oozingly soft-boiled egg, and the sheer pleasure he takes in it leaves the watching Elio in a state of quietly mesmerised shock. Guadagnino’s films have always been alive to food’s sensual possibilities and implications, and this brief but unforgettable example, with its unexpected gush of golden yolk and Hammer’s half-embarrassed, half-delighted laughter, is an immediate classic of its type. And if you think that sounds indecent, wait until you see what they do later with a peach.

When Oliver isn’t working, the two go cycling, stroll around the nearby village, and paddle in streams. At first, their relationship is brotherly more than anything else – lots of playful rubs and slaps – and Chalamet and Hammer’s chemistry feels totally unaffected and spontaneous. When Elio suffers a nosebleed at lunch, he retreats indoors: Oliver follows and they just sit on the floor together, enjoying the stolen split-second of intimacy, while Oliver affectionately rubs Elio’s feet.

Things slowly turn romantic, which becomes confusing for both of them, but Elio’s no more perplexed by his feelings for Oliver than by those he harbours for his on-off girlfriend Marzia (Esther Garrel), whom he’s known since childhood. There’s a tremendous scene in which Elio and his friends watch the slightly older, significantly more confident Oliver dirty-dancing with a woman at a party. The girls want to be with him, the boys just want to be him. With Elio, of course, it’s a bit of both.

Crucially, there’s no grand romantic obstacle course for them to scramble over, nor a villain vying to keep the two apart. All that holds them back are pragmatism and caution, plus a shared understanding that times this special are also fragile, and easily broken without sufficient care and thought.

I’ve always enjoyed Hammer’s more mannered mainstream roles, from Mirror Mirror  to The Man From UNCLE, which tend to spoof his chiselled looks. But his work here is better than anything he’s done since playing the Winklevoss twins in David Fincher’s The Social Network – it’s witty, compassionate, swaggeringly physical, and never less than fully inhabited.

Chalamet also makes an indelible impression, not least because this 21-year-old newcomer seems so miraculously untutored. And Stuhlbarg, who’s a treasure throughout, gets a fatherly monologue towards the film’s end that’s so observantly and tenderly performed, you can barely catch your breath.

It’s one beautiful moment in a film that’s filled with them – gone in a heartbeat, but leaving the kind of ripples that reach across a lifetime.


Director: Luca Guadagnino;
Starring: Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel.
15 cert, 132 mins



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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People sunbathe; they impetuously jump up and go swimming, have unhurried meals al fresco, cycle into town to drink in bars, or play volleyball. At any one time, nothing is happening, and everything is happening. Elio and Oliver will catch each other’s eye in their adjoining bedrooms or downstairs in the hall; they will casually notice each other changing into swimming costumes. Each of these intensely realised, superbly controlled and weighted moments is as gripping as a thriller.




https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/26/call-me-by-your-name-review-luca-guadagnino-armie-hammer




Call Me by Your Name
gorgeous gay love story seduces and overwhelms
Set during an endless Italian summer, Luca Guadagnino's ravishing drama starring
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet is imbued with a sophisticated sensuality

★★★★★
by Peter Bradshaw
@PeterBradshaw1

Thursday 26 October 2017 10.30 EDT



Hellenic sensuality is resurrected in concert with the not-so-secret sexual tumult emerging all about: Timothée Chalamet and
Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




The debt to pleasure is deferred in exquisite style for this ravishingly beautiful movie set in Northern Italy in the early 80s: a coming-of-age love story between a precocious teenage boy and a slightly older man. Their summer romance is saturated with poetic languor and a deeply sophisticated sensuality.

The film is directed by Luca Guadagnino (who made I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash) and adapted from the novel by André Aciman by James Ivory, who had originally been slated to co-direct and has a producer credit. Ivory’s presence inevitably calls to mind his film version of EM Forster’s Maurice, to which this is frankly superior. For me, it brought back Alan Hollinghurst novels such as The Folding Star  and The Spell. Call Me By Your Name  is an erotic pastoral that culminates in a quite amazing speech by Michael Stuhlbarg, playing the boy’s father. It’s a compelling dramatic gesture of wisdom, understanding and what I can only call moral goodness.

Stuhlbarg plays Perlman, a middle-aged American professor of classical antiquity living with his stylish wife Annella (Amira Cesar), in a handsome Italian house with their son, Elio – a remarkable performance from Timothée Chalamet – who is a very talented musician, spending his time transcribing Schoenberg and composing piano variations on JS Bach. Theirs is a cultured household, in which everyone is proficient in English, French, Italian and, for Annella, German. The family is also Jewish. Elio calls them “Jews of discretion”, a sense of otherness that is to serve as a metaphor for concealed sexuality.

Elio slopes and mopes about the huge house as the long hot summer commences, grumpy and moody, not knowing what to do with himself or his directionless sexuality, shooing away flies, frowning over paperbacks, dressed mostly in nothing more than shorts, all shoulder blades and hairless calves. Every year, his dad invites a favoured grad student to spend the summer with the family to help him with research. This year it is the impossibly handsome and statuesque Oliver, played by Armie Hammer, who never wears a pair of long trousers in the entire film. He establishes his academic credentials early on by presuming to correct Perlman’s derivation of the word “apricot”. Both Elio and Oliver are to have romantic associations with local young women, but it is more than clear where this is heading. And when the main event arrives, Guadagnino’s camera wanders tactfully away from their bed, gazing thoughtfully out of the window at the hot summer night.

What is perhaps so incredible is the concept of leisure, a cousin to pleasure, pure gorgeous indolence and sexiness for six whole weeks. No one appears to have very much to do in the way of dreary work, despite the references to typing up pages and cataloguing slides. People sunbathe; they impetuously jump up and go swimming, have unhurried meals al fresco, cycle into town to drink in bars, or play volleyball. The main work-related activity is when Perlman and Oliver go to inspect a sensational discovery: parts of a classical statue recovered from a lake. Hellenic sensuality is resurrected in concert with the not-so-secret sexual tumult emerging all about.

At any one time, nothing is happening, and everything is happening. Elio and Oliver will catch each other’s eye in their adjoining bedrooms or downstairs in the hall; they will casually notice each other changing into swimming costumes. Each of these intensely realised, superbly controlled and weighted moments is as gripping as a thriller. Hammer’s Oliver is worldlier than Elio, but not a roué or a cynic; in an odd way, Elio is more cosmopolitan than Oliver. The visiting American looks like a mix of Tom Ripley and Dickie Greenleaf.

Chalamet’s performance as Elio is outstanding, especially in an unbearably sad sequence, when he has to ring his mum from a payphone and ask to be driven home. (In that scene, Guadagnino contrives to show an old lady fanning herself in the right-hand side of the frame. Was she an actor? A non-professional who just happened to be there? Either way, there is a superb rightness to it.) And then there is Stuhlbarg’s speech advising against the impulse to cauterise or forget pain: “We rip out so much of ourselves to be cured of things faster than we should that we go bankrupt by the age of 30.” There is such tenderness to this film. I was overwhelmed by it.






And 9 months earlier--







Call Me by Your Name  is a masterful work because of the specificity of its details. This is not a love story that “just happens to be gay”. The level of trust and strength these characters share brings a richness that is not necessarily known to a universal audience. But the craft on display from all involved is an example, yet again, of how movies can create empathy in an almost spiritual way. This is a major entry in the canon of queer cinema.




https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jan/23/call-me-by-your-name-review-italian-romance




Sundance 2017
Call Me by Your Name
Sundance 2017 Review
Luca Guadagnino's masterful coming-of-age tale of an Italian fling between visiting academic
Armie Hammer and professor’s son Timothée Chalamet is a major addition to the queer canon


by Jordan Hoffman
@jhoffman

Monday 23 January 2017 06.27 EST



‘Touching and triumphant’ ... Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




Let’s bite right into the sweetest part of the fruit while it’s ripe. There’s a scene near the end of Luca Guadagnino's adaptation of André Aciman's novel Call Me by Your Name  between Michael Stuhlbarg and Timothée Chalamet that is, I feel confident in saying, one of the best exchanges between father and son in the history of cinema. We’ll all be quoting from it for the rest of our lives.

For many it will be a moment of wish fulfilment, and that may go doubly for queer people whose parents tragically reject them for their nature. The scene is touching and triumphant, but it wouldn’t work on an island. It comes after a build-up, an unhurried coming-of-age tale set in 1980s Italy reminiscent of the best of Eric Rohmer, Bernardo Bertolucci and André Téchiné, in which Elio (Chalamet) falls in love with Oliver (Armie Hammer) and needs to decide how he’ll direct the rest of his life.

Oliver is the latest in a string of annual research assistants joining Professor Perlman (Stuhlbarg) at his family’s fabulous summer villa. Elio’s father is an archaeologist/art historian, and his French mother (Amira Casar) recites German poetry, translating it on the fly as the two men in her life cuddle up with her on the couch. For fun Elio transcribes classical piano scores, which he can also transpose to guitar. The Perlman family is one that can slip a reference to Heidegger into conversation and no one will bat an eye.

It’s a world where the broad-shouldered, blond Oliver fits in nicely. He savagely owns Professor Perlman with his mad etymology skills, breaking down the word “apricot” to its Latin, Greek and Arabic roots. His half-unbuttoned shirt reveals a Star of David necklace, which catches 17-year-old Elio by surprise. (Elio later explains that his mother considers the Perlmans “Jews [of] discretion” in the sleepy northern Italian vacation village.) At first Elio is annoyed by Oliver, but quickly becomes infatuated. How Oliver feels about Elio is more of a mystery, but as the days and nights continue (so many meals outside! And dancing to the Psychedelic Furs!) the invitations to “go for a swim” eventually turn intimate.

Of the numerous fascinating, nuanced and realistic facets to their relationship, it’s hard at times to determine who is the driving force. Elio seems the aggressor, and unashamed about his feelings. (Though why is he so determined that his family’s gay friends catch him smooching a vacationing French girl?) Oliver seems so lithe, but are his initial rejections meant to protect Elio, or is he himself panicked about doing “something bad”? Luckily, this is a movie wise enough for its characters to be a little contradictory.

Luca Guadagnino’s last two films, A Bigger Splash  and I Am Love,  were both highly stylised, with dazzling extreme closeups, high-speed editing and brash musical selections. To put it in blunt terms, he reels it in this time. Scenes play out at a pace more befitting a summer in the Italian sun, and while there’s no shortage of well-placed props (a Robert Mapplethorpe print here, a Talking Heads T-shirt there) the natural settings and ancient cities are enough to keep the frame looking marvellous. A lesser film-maker (and co-writers including Walter Fasano and the great 88-year-old James Ivory) would probably cut the scene where bike-riding Elio and Oliver ask for a glass of water from an old woman peeling beans outside an old house. But these are the true-to-life grace notes that make this film so touching.

Call Me by Your Name  is a masterful work because of the specificity of its details. This is not a love story that “just happens to be gay”. The level of trust and strength these characters share brings a richness that is not necessarily known to a universal audience. But the craft on display from all involved is an example, yet again, of how movies can create empathy in an almost spiritual way. This is a major entry in the canon of queer cinema.



« Last Edit: October 27, 2017, 10:58:39 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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« Last Edit: October 28, 2017, 05:19:04 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
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“If there is any truth in the world, it lies when I'm with you, and if I find the courage to speak my truth to you one day,
remind me to light a candle in thanksgiving at every altar in Rome.”


“Something unexpected seemed to clear away between us, and, for a second, it seemed there was absolutely no difference in age
between us, just two men kissing, and even this seemed to dissolve, as I began to feel we were not even two men, just two beings.”




Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer









A few scenes from Call Me By Your Name  taken at a premiere, source unknown.
https://twitter.com/badpostchalamet  @badpostchalamet  timothée updates
https://twitter.com/apeachpricot  @apeachpricot


« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 07:55:50 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"