Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 239571 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Showtimes

Monday 11/6
6:45 PM Sie FilmCenter DFF

Special Presentation
Call Me by Your Name
Dir. Luca Guadagnino

Historical/Period, LGBTQ, Literary, Romance
CinemaQ, Special Presentation

English, Italian, French, German | English Subtitles | Italy/France, 2017, 132m



It's the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, where 17-year-old Elio spends his days in his family's villa playing classical music, reading and flirting with his friend Marzia. With academics for parents—his father is an eminent professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture, his mother Annella a translator—Elio is a precocious sort. But if he has the intellectual maturity of an adult, there is nevertheless much that yet remains innocent and unformed about him, particularly when it comes to matters of the heart.

Enter Oliver (Armie Hammer), a charming American doctoral candidate hired as a summer intern for Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio discovers the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a season that will alter his life forever.

Based on an acclaimed novel, the screenplay for this sensual and transcendent coming-of-age tale from Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino was penned by none other than that master of exquisite longing, James Ivory (A Room With a View, The Remains of the Day).








Producer: Emilie Georges, Luca Guadagnino, James Ivory, Marco Morabito, Howard Rosenman, Peter Spears, Rodrigo Teixeira
Editor: Walter Fasano | Cinematographer: Sayombhu Mukdeeprom | Screenwriter: James Ivory
Cast: Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel
Additional Countries: France, Brazil, USA



« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 05:22:49 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Timothée Chalamet’s Elio is Jewish, French, Italian, American and seventeen. His family spends their summers in Crema, a small town which feels plucked out of paradise and one that plays host to both leisurely bike rides and intense summer flings. Everything is normal and boring and relaxing until his father’s latest research assistant, Armie Hammer’s Oliver, takes over Elio’s bedroom for the summer. Elio moves into the room next door, sharing only a bathroom (the most intimate of spaces) with Oliver while the two maintain their distance. That is of course until their mutual back-and-forth of glances and flirtatious arguments lead to them dropping all pretense in front of one another, building protective walls around their affair in the process.





http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/10/04/nyff-review-call-me-by-your-name-like-getting-lost-in-secrets


film society lincoln center NYFF55/2017
Luca Guadagnino's
Call Me by Your Name
Like Getting Lost In Secrets.

by SIDDHANT ADLAKHA
Wednesday Oct 4 2017



Warmth incarnate, tenderness and bittersweet joy: Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Luca Guadagnino's Call Me by Your Name




NEW YORK -- Luca Guadagnino's latest is both alluring and alienating in equal measure. That’s part and parcel of its beauty. It forgoes the idea of a larger plot or structure – there is no broader conceit underscoring its will-they, won’t-they – instead choosing the interplay of secrets as its grounding point, as its lead characters engage in dance. Sometimes the dance is literal - the outward expression of music and rhythm on an Italian summer night. Other times the dance is the mere proximity of bodies and feelings, stepping backward, forward and back again, figuring out when to take the next step. As much as Call Me By Your Name  is “about” an academic researcher getting it on with his professor’s son (to be fair, Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalomet in shorts in the ‘80s ought to be reason enough), what it’s about is the complex nature of sexual and romantic secrecy, in all its joys and sorrows.

That it feels almost entirely unstructured works both against it and in its favour. Its two-hour runtime feels closer to three, owing to there being no discernible goalposts nor any indication of how long these lovers have left in their summertime romp, but is that necessarily a complaint when even its most drawn-out scenes focus on a pair of bodies and souls figuring each other out as they begin to figure out themselves? It exists almost detached from time, in a dreamlike state with scenes playing out like vignettes of varying lengths, beginning and ending (often abruptly) at heightened moments, but every scene is imbued with tenderness and bittersweet joy.

Chalomet’s Elio is Jewish, French, Italian, American and seventeen. His family spends their summers in Crema, a small town which feels plucked out of paradise and one that plays host to both leisurely bike rides and intense summer flings. Everything is normal and boring and relaxing until his father’s latest research assistant, Armie Hammer’s Oliver, takes over Elio’s bedroom for the summer. Elio moves into the room next door, sharing only a bathroom (the most intimate of spaces) with Oliver while the two maintain their distance. That is of course until their mutual back-and-forth of glances and flirtatious arguments lead to them dropping all pretense in front of one another, building protective walls around their affair in the process.

Timothée Chalomet is tremendous as Elio. His adolescent bravado in front of his summer girlfriend gives way to hunched over insecurities in private as he discovers a newfound sense of duality with Oliver, one he has no idea how to navigate. As much as he tries to play it cool, the profound weight of his self-discovery is terrifying. While the presence of the older, more experienced Oliver is the genesis for his confusion, he is also Elio’s comfort. Chalomet and Armie Hammer light up the screen with their chemistry, forming the kind of camaraderie you could get lost in. There’s a boyish playfulness to their dynamic, even as Oliver is at first wary of taking advantage of Elio’s fragility, but he too settles into his desires as Hammer’s own no-nonsense bluntness and brevity give way to protective empathy.

The new world that opens up in front of Elio isn’t just one of sex and romance. While there is liberation in sharing something pure and beautiful with Oliver it’s also a dynamic that must exist in secret, a constant changing of states that Oliver is accustomed to but one Elio still needs to figure out. There is no immediate danger per se – Elio’s parents, played by Michael Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar – seem open and accepting, and his affair with Oliver may very well be an open secret, yet the result of these lowered immediate stakes is the opportunity for the film to delve inward. There is a world outside of this bubble and an expiration date to whatever Elio and Oliver have, but the knowledge of its temporariness and finality isn’t framed as some dour, nihilistic sentiment. Stuhlbarg for instance, ends up the most warm and welcoming part of the film, his personable, paternal smile offering hope and comfort even in times of emotional disarray.

Elio may not be ready to come out by the end of it. He may not even be ready to accept himself, and the world may not be ready to accept him either, yet there comes a point in the film where he apes Oliver by proudly sporting a Star of David around his neck. Oliver, a child of New England, knows what it’s like to be the only Jew in the vicinity and for Elio, whose multi-cultural family describes themselves as “Jews of discretion,” that means knowing which parts of one’s identity to put on display. With yet another major social code to switch, the burden of identity could very well be overwhelming, but Oliver’s presence, like that of Call Me By Your Name  itself, acts as a guiding hand, making him less afraid to simply be.



Call Me By Your Name will open in New York and Los Angeles on November 24.


« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 12:29:56 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/10/14/call-me-by-your-name-sequel-possible

We May Be Getting A Sequel To
Call Me by Your Name
Director Luca Guadagnino drops some juicy hints.

by SIDDHANT ADLAKHA
Saturiday Oct 14 2017



Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet in Luca Guadagnino's Call Me by Your Name



Call Me By Your Name  hasn't been released in theatres yet, but as one of the best reviewed films out of both Sundance and the New York Film Festival, it's rightly receiving a lot of buzz. Some of that buzz now includes plans for a sequel, which would be in line with the film as it relates to André Aciman's original novel from 2007. You should probably steer clear of the rest of this article if you're looking to avoid spoilers, but that'd also be like trying to "spoil" the premise of [Director Richard Linklater's] Before Sunset  or Before Midnight, comparisons I don't make lightly given just how good Luca Guadagnino's latest is.

While speaking to ScreenDaily, Guadagnino shared a few details about a potential follow-up. Aciman's novel has Oliver and Elio meet up in America fifteen years after the events in Italy, though the potential sequel film doesn't seem like it's going to follow this to the letter since it'll take place only seven years later: ( https://www.screendaily.com/news/luca-guadagnino-plots-call-me-by-your-name-sequel-exclusive/5123280.article )
 



“I want to do a sequel because Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel – they are all gems,” said Guadagnino during a sit-down at the BFI London Film Festival, where Call Me By Your Name  played as a gala. “The texture we built together is very consistent. We created a place in which you believe in the world before them. They are young but they are growing up.”

“I don’t think Elio is necessarily going to become a gay man. He hasn’t found his place yet. I can tell you that I believe that he would start an intense relationship with Marzia [Esther Garrel’s character] again,” he said.





That second bit might raise some eyebrows from people who haven't seen the film given how much acclaim it's receiving for its intimate portrait of a same-sex releationship, though it should be noted that Guadagnino (a gay man himself) is not speaking out of turn, as his depiction of Elio and Oliver's sexualities is both complex and difficult to pin down at this stage in their lives. Guadagnino also envisions Elio as the kind of character who could recur throughout his filmography (much like Truffaut's Antoine Doinel), though if I'm being honest, what I really want is Armie Hammer dancing to songs from various decades.

The sequel, should it happen, won't be released until 2020, but it's already a damn exciting prospect. We'll keep you posted as soon as we hear more.








"I think I'll make another film in the future about the characters in Call Me by Your Name.  I'd love to make a cycle of films based on them. How they grow up. Will they meet again? What happens when they meet again?"


Do you know?? I've been thinking  this! The very last five pages of the book (at the end of Part 4, "Ghost Spots") have a very open-ended quality, no?? Obviously Luca, André and producer Peter Spears have talked about it. Shades of director Richard Linklater's Before Sunrise  (1995), Before Sunset  (2004) and Before Midnight  (2013), which I have always loved!

FYI: Richard Linklater: No one’s ruling out a Before  quadrilogy, FEBRUARY 27, 2017,
http://ew.com/movies/2017/02/27/richard-linklater-before-sunset-trilogy/



Celine (Julie Delpy): "Baby. You are going to miss that plane." (talk-singing along with Nina Simone to  Jesse)
Jesse (Ethan Hawke): "I know." (laughs)




[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip9PgKmil0s[/youtube]


Before Sunset  (2004)
Julie Delpy & Ethan Hawke
(by director Richard Linklater)

Published on Apr 9, 2015








Luca Guadagnino for Fantastic Man Magazine No. 26


"I think I'll make another film in the future about the characters in Call Me by Your Name.  I'd love to make a cycle of films based on them. How they grow up. Will they meet again? What happens when they meet again?"

Director Luca Guadagnino delivers an interview vérité in the new issue of @ManFantastic ahead of the worldwide release of his spectacularly romantic new movie Call Me by Your Name.


#LucaGuadagnino #CallMeByYourName
#FantasticMan #Cinema #Art #Culture #KarlaOtto


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Powerfully emotional and exquisitely romantic, this is a beautifully made and wonderfully acted film that has every element working together in perfect harmony. It is, quite simply, a masterpiece.





https://inews.co.uk/essentials/culture/film/call-me-by-your-name-review/

  News The Essential Daily Briefing

Call Me by Your Name
This nostalgic coming-of-age romance is one of the year’s best films.
★★★★★
by Matthew Turner
Thursday Oct 26 2017



An emotional masterpiece: Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Luca Guadagnino's Call Me by Your Name




Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalomet star in this achingly romantic tale of first love from director Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash). Adapted from André Aciman’s 2007 coming-of-age and coming out novel by screenwriter James Ivory, this is one of the year’s best films. A heady concoction of love, life and longing, suffused with a warm glow of nostalgia.

Set in 1983, the film centres on musically gifted 17 year-old Elio Perlman (Chalamet), who is spending the summer at his family’s palazzo in Northern Italy. When 24 year-old graduate student Oliver (Hammer) arrives to help Elio’s antiquities professor father (Michael Stuhlbarg) with his research, Elio becomes obsessed with him, their erotic proximity heightened by having to share an adjoining bathroom. As the days pass, Elio is thrilled to discover the intensity of his feelings for Oliver reciprocated, and the pair embark on a secret love affair. Guadagnino’s direction is exceptional, creating a richly evocative atmosphere that perfectly captures the intoxicating rush of first love.


Bittersweet atmosphere

In particular, Guadagnino perfectly captures the specific sense of time and place, depicting the family’s fabulously idyllic existence (al fresco dinners, trips to the local swimming hole, bike rides into town, etc), all of which is heightened by a nostalgia-inducing soundtrack and gorgeous cinematography from Sayombhu Mukdeeprom that’s so transporting you can practically feel the sun shining on your face.

However, there’s a bittersweet note too, because there’s the constant sense that both the summer and the relationship will shortly come to an end. Guadagnino orchestrates a number of wonderful sequences, particularly in the first half of the film, where the characters are effectively circling each other and every gesture and look is ripe with potential meaning. Though the film ultimately shies away from anything too explicit, there’s a scene involving the erotic use of a peach that is destined for instant notoriety and somehow manages to be tender, funny and shocking, all at once. (Let’s just say Philip Roth would have been proud).


Profoundly moving

Previously best known for Homeland, relative newcomer Chalamet delivers a star-making performance as Elio, his expressive face and body language conveying a complex array of emotions, with minimal dialogue. Similarly, Hammer (who continues to make interesting choices) delivers his best performance to date, turning his all-American golden boy charisma up to the maxium setting and sparking palpable chemistry with Chalamet. The film is largely dominated by the two leads, but the ever-reliable Michael Stuhlbarg has a terrific father-son speech towards the end of the film that is profoundly moving and likely to lead to a few tear-stained cheeks.

As if the whole thing wasn’t heavenly enough already, Guadagnino brings down the curtain with a wonderful final shot that ranks as one of the best endings to a film in recent memory.

Powerfully emotional and exquisitely romantic, this is a beautifully made and wonderfully acted film that has every element working together in perfect harmony. It is, quite simply, a masterpiece.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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It’s summertime and the living is easy. Against the backdrop of unhurried life at a villa in Lombardy, the emotions of the 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) jangle and thrum like guitar strings as he becomes gradually besotted with Oliver (Armie Hammer), his professor father’s 24-year-old research assistant, who is staying with the family for six weeks.






https://www.newstatesman.com/culture/film/2017/10/call-me-your-name-emotionally-charged-love-affair-taut-inner-tensions


Call Me by Your Name
An emotionally charged love affair taut with inner tensions
Luca Guadagnino is an intensely sensual director, but he knows how to undercut a moment.

by RYAN GILBEY
27 October 2017



In Call Me by Your Name a pounding piano reproduces Elio’s desires in musical form as Timothée Chalamet plays to Armie Hammer.



Most love stories require an impediment against which the central romance can be tested. I love you but we’re married to other people (Brief Encounter). I love you but you’re dying (Love Story), or dead (Ghost ). I love you but I’m a diplomat’s wife and you’re a chimpanzee (Max Mon Amour).

What’s peculiar about Call Me by Your Name  is the lack of any external resistance to the gay love affair at the heart of the story. No homophobia, no disapproving peers or parents. The film, adapted from André Aciman’s 2007 novel, is set in northern Italy in 1983, just before fears about HIV and Aids would have impinged on these characters’ lives. It’s equally important that this is an era that predates mobile phones. No one can express their feelings with a winking cartoon face or an upturned aubergine. It has to be done for real.

The achievement of the director Luca Guadagnino is to create in the absence of any obvious opposition a picture that is still taut with inner tensions. It’s summertime and the living is easy. Against the backdrop of unhurried life at a villa in Lombardy, the emotions of the 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) jangle and thrum like guitar strings as he becomes gradually besotted with Oliver (Armie Hammer), his professor father’s 24-year-old research assistant, who is staying with the family for six weeks.

Two things snag his interest. The first is the Star of David that Oliver wears, nestling in his chest hair. (Elio is also Jewish, though his mother describes the family as “Jews of discretion”.) The second is Oliver’s easy physicality. Elio is startled to receive a shoulder massage from him while watching a volleyball game. Squirming free, he is hauled back by the older man, who then enlists a nearby teenage girl to continue the massage. It’s the first in a series of gestures that involve puppetry of some description. The next occurs when Elio clocks Oliver’s attraction to a local woman and tries to play matchmaker between them, much to Oliver’s displeasure. Tellingly, when they make up, it is through another act of puppeteering: Oliver extends the hand of friendship to Elio, only it isn’t his own hand but the one attached to a sculpted, disembodied arm. The film charts the dismantling of their defences as they move beyond preening and proxies towards an ideal of intimacy.

With a handful of exceptions, the film is told from Elio’s heightened, hormonal perspective. At the sound of a bicycle bell, the camera might pan round distractedly to see where it is coming from. The sudden cut when Oliver rolls off the side of the pool and into the water mimics Elio’s electrified jumpiness. Chalamet’s performance is enchantingly physical, even feline. He keeps breaking out into unselfconscious dance moves – a soft-shoe shuffle or a prance like a cartoon burglar’s tiptoed prowl. A pounding piano reproduces Elio’s desires in musical form and the reflective new songs by Sufjan Stevens introduce the possibility that he is looking back on all this from middle age.

It’s an idea that Guadagnino pursues near the end of the film, when Oliver is watching Elio sleep. He swivels his head in response to a noise that is audible to us also, but turns out to be the sound of a train drawing into a station the following morning. Guadagnino (a former film critic and the director of I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash) will know that his countryman Sergio Leone used a ringing telephone to tie together a montage spanning several different time periods in Once Upon a Time in America. The effect here strikes the same note of disorienting melancholy, as though the characters were waking from dreams wreathed in memories.

Guadagnino is an intensely sensual director, almost parodically so, but he knows how to undercut a moment so that its emotional charge is deferred. When Oliver and Elio finally broach the subject of their mutual attraction, they are shown in a wide shot, separated from one another by a statue commemorating the Battle of the Piave River and almost drowned out by the hydraulic hiss of an approaching bus. Anyone would think the driver didn’t know that two men were confessing their love for one another and changing the course of their lives.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The film begins with classical images of male heads and torsos, and abounds with references to Praxiteles and Hellenistic sculpture, establishing and pursuing (sometimes a little too pointedly) the theme of male on male desire. The atmosphere is pagan, the time not just BCE but BCPBefore Cell Phones. Oliver appears rather like a deus ex machina  (almost literally: climbing out of a car, blond head rising and rising some more), an Adonis who moves as if by divine right among the French-Italian admirers.





https://www.filmcomment.com/article/call-me-by-your-name-review-armie-hammer/


Published by Film Society of Lincoln Center
Call Me by Your Name
is more invitingly heartfelt and less baroque than director Luca Guadagnino's
previous films, and skillfully captures both the languor of the summer mood.


by Molly Haskell
03 November 2017
(in the November/December 2017 Issue)



Call Me by Your Name--As Elio (Timothée Chalamet) teases Oliver (Armie Hammer) with his variations on the classical
composers, an ingenious score provides an expressive correlative to the tumult in Elio’s head and loins.




In the brief annals of mainstream queer cinema, Call Me by Your Name  falls in line with Moonlight  in taking a resolutely non-hysterical, non-polemical approach to homoeroticism, treating sexual encounters with a kind of unhurried, tactile sensuality. Society, as enforcer and inhibitor, plays very little part, as both stories take place outside the bounds of middle-class morality—but from different, even opposing ends of the spectrum. Barry Jenkins’s triptych involves a black man’s coming-of-age in Miami, while Luca Guadagnino’s portrait of a teenager’s sexual awakening takes place in a luxuriant corner of Lombardy, but both have demonstrated crossover appeal, Moonlight  having garnered multiple awards including last year’s Oscar for Best Picture, and Call Me by Your Name  currently carrying ecstatic pre-opening raves from Sundance and Toronto film festivals.

The Italian director who displayed a kind of swashbuckling Euro-chic sensibility in I Am Love  (2009) and A Bigger Splash  (2015), both featuring a stunningly marmoreal Tilda Swinton as erotic figurehead, moves his latest exploration of Desire with a capital D into a less exalted environment—but only slightly less. We are in the vacation home of the Perlmans (Michael Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar), assimilated Jews and among those casually seigneurial intellectual-bourgeois families of exquisite taste and multiple languages. They enjoy scholarly disputes and culinary delights in an alfresco setting in which the sun itself is a kind of benediction. (The real miracle, it turns out, is one of cinematic artifice: reportedly it rained all summer—the only time the film could be made—and the extraordinary cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom managed to turn dark into light.)

Guadagnino has moved the setting of André Aciman’s 2007 novel from the Italian Riviera to his home base in Northern Italy, but otherwise the screenplay by James Ivory is beautifully faithful. Every year Mr. Perlman, a classicist with archaeological interests, hires an American grad student to help with research and live with the family. Every year the newcomer dispossesses their son, Elio (the remarkable Timothée Chalamet), of his room. But this particular summer, Elio, now 17, will find his way back through a wildly unexpected flowering of lust for the stranger, Oliver (Armie Hammer). The minutely observed vicissitudes of their duet of mutual approach and avoidance, set against a background of picnics, dances, bicycle rides, and swims, form the essence of the drama.

The major difference between page and screen is that where Aciman’s novel unfolded in a heated burst of first-person recollection from the older Elio’s point of view, the movie takes place in the present tense (though it’s set in 1983), and widens the field of vision. Elio is still at the center, bored, flailing, given to fits of despair, but we are no longer cloistered within the sometimes suffocating hothouse of an acutely self-conscious adolescent mind (Does he see me? Does he respond? Dare I speak to him?), second-guessing every move, noting every passing thought and dream fantasy. Other characters—would-be girlfriends who pursue the boys—have their moments, however fleeting, and more importantly, Elio is a gifted pianist. As he teases Oliver with his variations on the classical composers, music forms both a leitmotif and a beckoning vocation. An ingenious score (with original songs) by Sufjan Stevens provides an expressive correlative to the tumult in Elio’s head and loins.

In one sense, Elio is every teenager beset by raging hormones, every adolescent not yet formed, who alternates between longing and terror, flight or fight or fuck, in whom male and female sides still struggle for domination or truce. The struggle is only slightly compounded by same-sex taboo, and the suspense, such as it is, is not whether but when.

The film begins with classical images of male heads and torsos, and abounds with references to Praxiteles and Hellenistic sculpture, establishing and pursuing (sometimes a little too pointedly) the theme of male on male desire. The atmosphere is pagan, the time not just BCE but BCP—Before Cell Phones. Oliver appears rather like a deus ex machina (almost literally: climbing out of a car, blond head rising and rising some more), an Adonis who moves as if by divine right among the French-Italian admirers.

Elio doesn’t know if his attraction is reciprocated; Oliver hesitates, presumably because he must consider the ethics of his position as both guest and older person, and therefore, like Humphrey Bogart, must “think for both of them.” At least I am assuming such reflections are taking place somewhere behind that pleasant but remarkably inscrutable face. Though Oliver wears a Star of David, thus establishing kinship with the Perlmans, Hammer is a more natural signifier of WASP entitlement. He was perfectly cast as the Winklevoss twins in The Social Network : he might as well be a digital double as a real person, as he was when he was rowing with himself at the Henley Royal Regatta. He’s somebody who represents rather than inhabits—an archetype, like his blandly smug philanderer-husband in Nocturnal Animals.

Parker Tyler, that astute chronicler of homosexual themes, gave a mythical dimension to this figure whom he called Homoeros, and saw as transformational in movies like Death in Venice, Billy Budd, The Confessions of Felix Krull, and Teorema. Hammer has none of the ambisexual allure of Terence Stamp or Tilda Swinton. He is a more one-dimensional stud, perhaps closer to the Liv Tyler character in Bertolucci’s Stealing Beauty, an object of directorial lust you have to take on faith. And speaking of Bertolucci, in the movie’s much-talked-about scene between two guys and a peach, Guadagnino also competes with his Italian predecessor for most outrageous coupling of food and sex.

Call Me by Your Name  is more invitingly heartfelt and less baroque than the director’s previous films, and skillfully captures both the languor of the summer mood, as time stretches into boredom, and the simultaneous feel of time closing in, of the possibility of missed opportunities, hanging like overripe fruit at the end of a branch. (It’s one of those movies over which fruit metaphors hang irresistibly.)

In the end, the film finds its perfect grace note and even its reason for being not in the final shot of grief-stricken Elio’s anguished face, but in the preceding passage in which his father, in a gesture of exquisite tact and empathy, confers a kind of blessing on him, letting him know he’s aware of the nature of the relationship. Not only does papa not disapprove, he envies the son for leaping where he himself was once tempted, hesitated… and settled for less. In this movie, heterosexual marriage is definitely the consolation prize.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
https://finny-red.tumblr.com/

by finny-red.tumblr.com


My mother, who hated what she called his Americanisms, ended up calling him Il cauboi --the cowboy. It started as a putdown and soon became an endearment, to go along with her other nickname for him, conferred during his first week, when he came down to the dinner table after showering, his glistening hair combed back. La star, she had said, short for la muvi star. My father, always the most indulgent among us, but also the most observant, had figured the cauboi out. "È un timido, he's shy, that's why," he said when asked to explain Oliver's abrasive Later!

Oliver timido? That was new. Could all of his gruff Americanisms be nothing more than an exaggerated way of covering up the simple fact that he didn't know--or feared he didn't know--how to take his leave gracefully?





For weeks I had mistaken his stare for barefaced hostility. I was wide of the mark. It was simply a shy man's way of holding someone else's gaze.

We were, it finally dawned on me, the two shyest persons in the world.

My father was the only one who had seen through him from the very start.






Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer





CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by finny-red.tumblr.com/

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October 21 2017   117 Notes

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName #finny-red.tumblr.com
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by finny-red.tumblr.com


« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 07:52:49 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=800,472]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCsyocpQyok[/youtube]
FULL LENGTH    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCsyocpQyok    WITH LYRICS
Whew! At long last!
From soundtrack, not screening.
As before, top image from
Baia Jamaica, Sirmione,
Lago di Garda.

Sufjan Stevens - Mystery of Love
Call Me by Your Name
Soundtrack released November 3 2017


Jonathan Leo
Published on Nov 3, 2017





It's the summer of 1983, and precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman is spending the days with his family at their 17th-century villa in Lombardy, Italy. He soon meets Oliver, a handsome doctoral student who's working as an intern for Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.




Sufjan Stevens "Mystery of Love"
From the film CALL ME BY YOUR NAME by Luca Guagagnino



Mystery of Love

Oh, to see without my eyes
The first time that you kissed me
Boundless by the time I cried
I built your walls around me
White noise, what an awful sound
Fumbling by Rogue River
Feel my feet above the ground
Hand of God, deliver me

Oh, oh woe-oh-woah is me
The first time that you touched me
Oh, will wonders ever cease?
Blessed be the mystery of love

Lord, I no longer believe
Drowned in living waters
Cursed by the love that I received
From my brother's daughter
Like Hephaestion, who died
Alexander's lover
Now my riverbed has dried
Shall I find no other?

Oh, oh woe-oh-woah is me
I'm running like a plover
Now I'm prone to misery
The birthmark on your shoulder reminds me

How much sorrow can I take?
Blackbird on my shoulder
And what difference does it make
When this love is over?
Shall I sleep within your bed
River of unhappiness
Hold your hands upon my head
Till I breathe my last breath

Oh, oh woe-oh-woah is me
The last time that you touched me
Oh, will wonders ever cease?
Blessed be the mystery of love



« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 11:55:05 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Once again--
but this time from
the actual recording,
not a screening--



These are the last few minutes of the movie,
Elio looking into the fire, crying and remembering--
until his mother's voice calls


"Elio--"





[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiBUIwzN6FA[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiBUIwzN6FA
The very last
moments of the movie--

Sufjan Stevens - Visions of Gideon
Call Me by Your Name
Soundtrack released November 3 2017


Jonathan Yule
Published on Nov 3, 2017






It's the summer of 1983, and precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman is spending the days with his family at their 17th-century villa in Lombardy, Italy. He soon meets Oliver, a handsome doctoral student who's working as an intern for Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.





STILL not sure about
those lyrics yet--oh well!
 :-\ :-\


Sufjan Stevens "Visions of Gideon"
From the film CALL ME BY YOUR NAME by Luca Guagagnino



Visions of Gideon

I have loved you for the last time

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

I have touched you for the last time

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?
Is it a video?

I have loved you for the last time

Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon

I have kissed you for the last time

Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Is it a video?
Is it a video?

[ For the love, the laughter I feel up to your arms ]

Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon
Visions of Gideon





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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This is the third
of the three
Sufjan Stevens
songs on the
CMBYN soundtrack;
unlike the other two
original songs, this
is a new 'Doveman' remix
(originally from 2010)--




[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2nMUrSv4hE[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2nMUrSv4hE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doveman
Thomas Bartlett also known as Doveman,
is an American pianist, singer, and producer,
best known for his work with Sufjan Stevens
and many more.


Sufjan Stevens - Futile Devices (Doveman Remix)
Call Me by Your Name
Soundtrack released November 3 2017


icecream forever
Published on Nov 3, 2017










Sufjan Stevens "Futile Devices" (Doveman Remix)
From the film CALL ME BY YOUR NAME by Luca Guagagnino



Futile Devices

It's been a long, long time
Since I've memorized your face
It's been four hours now
Since I've wandered through your place
And when I sleep on your couch
I feel very safe
And when you bring the blankets
I cover up my face

I do
Love you
I do
Love you

And when you play guitar
I listen to the strings buzz
The metal vibrates underneath your fingers
And when you crochet
I feel mesmerized and proud

And I would say I love you
But saying it out loud
is hard
So I won't say it at all
And I won't stay very long

But you are the life I needed all along
I think of you as my brother
Although that sounds dumb
 
And words are futile devices






[youtube=640,360]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2dNTjE6ItI[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2dNTjE6ItI

Futile Devices - Sufjan Stevens
Live on Soundcheck

Published on Jul 27, 2011









To accompany the classical music is a trio songs from the aforementioned Sufjan Stevens, two of them original. Along with employing a new ethereal piano arrangement of “Futile Devices” in a moment of longing, the original songs have the feel of tracks off Carrie & Lowell, albeit with more of a wistful elation. For one of these songs, Guadagnino utilizes one of his few overt directorial flourishes: the effect of a film burn as a lonely Elio contemplates furthering their relationship, then later the visualization of a camera negative when he reflects on the time they have had. Both are fleeting flourishes, appearing only for a few seconds, but indelibly convey the passion inside Elio’s soul.

A feat of accentuated sound design, as hands run down staircases and across bodies, and arresting cinematography, luxuriating in the beauty of Italy and those that occupy it, Call Me By Your Name  has the effect of being transported to this specific time and place. It’s a film of overwhelming empathy and playfulness as loneliness turns into gratification and desires are slowly manifested into reality.











Sufjan Stevens’ latest album, Carrie & Lowell, was a beautifully simplistic work based on his mother’s death and his reeling emotions of anger, abandonment, loss and love. It will be very interesting to see Stevens tackling a film score, as most of his work is so broad in scope that it lends itself to a cinematic format. So everything should translate well, but it’s exciting to see him fully embrace the format.




https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/01/sufjan-stevens-scores-indie-film-call-me-by-your-n.html

Sufjan Stevens
Scores Indie Film
Call Me by Your Name

by Pete Mercer
January 9, 2017, 12:05pm



Sufjan Stevens scores Call Me by Your Name



Sufjan Stevens, singer/songwriter and creator of the (overly) ambitious 50 States Project, has written and performed the soundtrack for new indie film Call Me by Your Name.  The film stars Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet and Michael Stuhlbarg, and is based on André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same name.

Directed by Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino, the film follows the love affair between a 24-year-old American scholar visiting Italy, and the 17-year-old Jewish-American boy whose family provides housing for the American while he helps the young boy’s father revise book manuscripts. The film takes place in the 1980s along the Italian Riviera, so expect some really lovely Italian scenery, accompanied by Stevens’ often beautifully melodic music.

Stevens’ latest album, Carrie & Lowell, was a beautifully simplistic work based on his mother’s death and his reeling emotions of anger, abandonment, loss and love. It will be very interesting to see Stevens tackling a film score, as most of his work is so broad in scope that it lends itself to a cinematic format. So everything should translate well, but it’s exciting to see him fully embrace the format.

There is no formal release date for the soundtrack or the film, which hits Sundance on Jan. 22.



FYI: Call Me By Your Name premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and opens on November 24.








Have you met him (Sufjan Stevens)?

"I wrote to him and invited him over to my house to see the film
when it was finished, as he was coming to Italy anyway. So, the
doorbell rings, and this stunningly beautiful man is at the door.
I mean, I’d seen pictures of him, but in reality he is beyond
handsome! Those eyes!
"













 Kyle Buchanan
                                       @kylebuchanan


7:53 AM -  23 Jan 2017
50 Retweets 137 Likes


https://twitter.com/kylebuchanan

« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 07:46:44 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"