Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 239628 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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But Guadagnino never turns the temperature down. The heat generated by, say, an index finger stroking a lower lip—that digit soon to be lightly nibbled and sucked by the mouth it is caressing—could burn a hole through the screen.



http://www.4columns.org/anderson-melissa/call-me-by-your-name


4Columns
Call Me by Your Name
Melissa Anderson
November 17 2017



Amore caldo!
Director Luca Guadagnino adapts André Aciman’s tale of summer love.






Call Me by Your Name, directed by Luca Guadagnino, opening
November 24, 2017, in New York and Los Angeles

•   •   •


Languor, lust; yearning, yielding: Call Me by Your Name—a sexy, melancholy summer idyll directed by the supreme cine-sybarite Luca Guadagnino—lushly shows how desire is deftly articulated, even when not explicitly labeled or spoken. The title is a carnal directive, pillow talk shared by two same-sex lovers, seventeen-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and twentysomething Oliver (Armie Hammer). The words gay or homosexual are never uttered in the film; the terms would be redundant, meager for what is so rapturously enacted.

Call Me by Your Name, like Guadagnino’s earlier eros-fueled films I Am Love  (2009) and A Bigger Splash  (2015), teems with voluptuousness. Each movie is a celebration of hedonism among the affluent and is set wholly or partially in a visually ravishing part of Italy: San Remo, where an unfulfilled haute-bourgeoise wife played by Tilda Swinton ruts al fresco with a younger chef in I Am Love ; Pantelleria, a volcanic island off the coast of Sicily that serves as the backdrop for the debauchery of an intergenerational quartet in A Bigger Splash. Opening text in Guadagnino’s latest identifies the location only as “somewhere in northern Italy”; a scan of the press notes reveals that the film was shot in the bucolic town of Crema, where the director himself lives. (The estival glory of the Lombardy region is further showcased by cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, who here shoots on 35mm. He’s a frequent collaborator of another sensualist auteur, the Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul.)

The change in setting is one of many alterations, both large and small, from the film’s source material, André Aciman’s debut 2007 novel of the same name, which situates the action in an unnamed spot on the Italian Riviera. Aciman’s book is also slightly vague about its exact chronology; all we know is that its central romance takes place “in the mid-eighties.” Guadagnino’s movie, in contrast, assigns a specific year—1983—for its libidinous hot-weather splendor.

These are ultimately superficial amendments, though, for what survives beautifully intact in the page-to-screen transfer is the book’s intricately calibrated mood and tone. A Proust scholar, Aciman structures his novel as Elio’s remembrance of things past. Guadagnino’s film dispenses with that framing device; there is no first-person voice-over (or narration of any kind) looking back from the vantage, and the wisdom, of the present. But a dolorous prolepsis haunts every tender, arousing moment in the movie—instances that are fated to die almost as soon as they’re born. Significantly, Call Me by Your Name  was scripted by James Ivory, that longtime paragon, along with his work and life partner Ismail Merchant (who died in 2005), of decorous, mezzo-brow cinema, such as the seemingly countless E.M. Forster adaptations they oversaw in the 1980s and ’90s. Guadagnino’s film may be less sexually explicit and candid than Aciman’s text, which matter-of-factly discusses the next-day physical sensations after anal sex. But Guadagnino never turns the temperature down. The heat generated by, say, an index finger stroking a lower lip—that digit soon to be lightly nibbled and sucked by the mouth it is caressing—could burn a hole through the screen.

Elio first glimpses the young man who will consume him completely from his bedroom window, on the second story of the villa that his Euro-American family—the Perlmans, “Jews of discretion”—occupies during the summer and winter holidays. Oliver, a Heraclitus scholar from the States who proudly sports a Star of David necklace, has arrived for a six-week stay at the Perlman home, a residency that requires him to assist Elio’s dad (Michael Stuhlbarg), a professor of antiquities, with some light administrative tasks. (Oliver’s age is given as twenty-four in the book but never specified in the film.) Peering down with Elio at this tall, exceedingly confident and charismatic visitor is Marzia (Esther Garrel), the teenager’s coeval and friend, sometimes a non-platonic one.

A beloved, precocious only child, Elio may spend his days transcribing and playing Bach and reading Conrad, but certain semaphores convey his contemporary passions: his Talking Heads T-shirt, various posters—one of Peter Gabriel, another, perhaps a little too tellingly, of Robert Mapplethorpe—hanging in his bedroom, which he soon relinquishes to the strapping Yank postdoc. “You’re bigger than your picture,” Professor Perlman says, with a mixture of awe and alarm, to Oliver as soon as he steps out of the cab.

The adolescent gazes at Oliver—who crashes out, in a jet-lagged stupor, on Elio’s bed with his Converse high-tops still on—with a similar reaction. But at the breakfast table the next morning, when Oliver, in an off-hand comment about his insatiable appetite (for soft-boiled eggs) and his need to curb it, intimates both the enormity of his hunger and a keen self-awareness (“I know myself”), Elio finds that his own ravenousness has been stoked.

Most of the first half of Call Me by Your Name  captures the ambiguous gestures (Oliver giving a quick shoulder massage to Elio, who initially recoils) and coy flirtation (Elio casually showing off at the piano for Oliver) that feed, if only in slight portions, each young man’s increasing hunger for the other. These signals, some bolder than others, make up an exquisite—but never precious—choreography, leading up to what looks like a Judson Dance pas de deux at the town square, where Elio and Oliver acknowledge their attraction, in, unsurprisingly, the most circumlocutory way: “Are you saying what I think you’re saying?” the older guy asks the younger one.

However evasive their language, their bodies know exactly how to communicate after this initial admission, including when to pause and when to linger. The seconds that precede a deep kiss between Elio and Oliver rank among the sexiest of screen caesuras, a respite during which a spectator is invited to recall similar scenarios she may have found herself in, even while her attention remains focused on the bodies, the lives, the desires of the two men in front of her.

Regarding those bodies: I’ve watched Call Me by Your Name  two times, and, to paraphrase the Greek philosopher whom Oliver specializes in, no viewer ever sees the same movie twice. Where Hammer, golden, towering, bronzed, built—a “steak,” to use a colleague’s apt description—struck me as the film’s corporeal center on my initial viewing, the frail, ephebic Chalamet now seems, paradoxically, the movie’s most vital and vigorous figure after the second. What the actor does with his mouth, his eyes, and his breathing rhythms in the movie’s gutting closing scene wordlessly demonstrates the fluency of his multilingual character in another kind of idiom, mastered in a summer-immersion program.


Melissa Anderson is the film editor of  4Columns. From November 2015 until September 2017, she was the senior film critic for the  Village Voice. She is a frequent contributor to  Artforum and  Bookforum.


« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 11:13:39 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
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(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline southendmd

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Just think!  Last September (2016), I had been barely 5 miles away from Bordighera! 
Joey and I were staying near the next town up, Ventimiglia.
Of course, I hadn't read the book at that time...

Here's our little bit of heaven:



Quote
 André Aciman
                                       @aaciman


7:18 AM - 26 Oct 2016
3 Retweets 27 Likes


https://twitter.com/aaciman?lang=en
https://twitter.com/aaciman/status/791282872879546369


I'll be giving a talk in Bordighera this weekend.  Can't wait.  It's my favorite spot in the planet.



Offline southendmd

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Oh, and my poster arrived today.


Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Just think!  Last September (2016), I had been barely 5 miles away from Bordighera!  
Joey and I were staying near the next town up, Ventimiglia.
Of course, I hadn't read the book at that time...

Here's our little bit of heaven:







Heaven is right!!   :o :o :o

Meanwhile, referencing this--






Ha! We figured!!!


 André Aciman
                                                @aaciman


7:18 AM - 26 Oct 2016
3 Retweets 27 Likes


https://twitter.com/aaciman?lang=en
https://twitter.com/aaciman/status/791282872879546369


I'll be giving a talk in Bordighera this weekend.  Can't wait.  It's my favorite spot in the planet.






read this--

Fascinating!!!    8) 8) 8)






"Call Me By Your Name, expected to be one of this year’s Oscar favorites, came together because of a botched vacation. It started in April 2005, when André Aciman’s plans to take his wife and three sons to a Mediterranean villa fell through. Frustrated, the Upper West Side novelist and City University of New York professor started writing a love story set on the Italian Riviera in the mid-1980s--"





https://nypost.com/2017/11/20/call-me-by-your-name-author-dont-be-afraid-of-same-sex-crushes/


Call Me by Your Name  author:
Don’t be afraid of same-sex crushes
By Christian Gollayan
November 20, 2017 | 5:32pm



André Aciman, author of Call Me By Your Name, played a cameo role in the film adaptation (right).
Photo Sigrid Estrada





Call Me By Your Name, expected to be one of this year’s Oscar favorites, came together because of a botched vacation.

It started in April 2005, when André Aciman’s plans to take his wife and three sons to a Mediterranean villa fell through. Frustrated, the Upper West Side novelist and City University of New York professor started writing a love story set on the Italian Riviera in the mid-1980s.

“I was writing about a nice house with a pine alley … there was a young man in the house, basically a portrait of who I would be if I grew up in Italy,” the 66-year-old, who grew up in Egypt, tells The Post. “And then there was a young man who comes in the picture … I wasn’t planning on writing that kind of story. It just blossomed out of my own curiosity.”

Written in just three months, Call Me By Your Name  is a tender coming-of-age tale about Elio, a 17-year-old genius who falls in love with Oliver, a 24-year-old graduate student who’s studying with Elio’s professor father for the summer. When it was published in 2007, critics called it a modern gay classic, albeit one written by a writer who isn’t gay. A film producer bought the rights to the story that same year.

Opening in New York Friday, the film stars Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet as the star-crossed lovers. Aciman, who has a brief cameo as Elio’s family’s friend, says he hopes the story’s same-sex romance will resonate with everyone.

“This is the biggest secret of humanity,” he says. “Everybody assumes that if they suddenly have a stirring for the same sex that it’s only them … that nobody feels this way, but we all do.”

Despite some expressing concern about the seven-year gap between the lovers, Aciman sees nothing wrong with their love.

“[Their relationship] is so consensual, I don’t even give it a second thought,” he says. “There’s clearly abuses out there, horrible abuses, but Elio is the one who asks and Oliver says, ‘We can’t do this. This is wrong.’ We’re not talking about 10-year-olds. [Elio] is almost 18. Would 18 have been a better age? I don’t know.”

Although director Luca Guadagnino made some changes when translating the book to the big screen, Aciman says he’s happy with the final product. “The best scenes in the movie were right out of the book,” he says. “How can I complain?”

He says one of his favorite moments is when Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg) tells his son the importance of being vulnerable in love: “I got a lot of mail from gay men in their 60s who basically said, ‘This book moved me because I only wish my father said that to me.’”

Although the movie ends on the Hanukkah following Elio and Oliver’s summer romance, the book closes 20 years later. Guadagnino’s talked about making a sequel with the same cast, and Aciman says he’s more than happy to collaborate.

“It’s not really a sequel as it’s the rest of the book,” Aciman says. “If Guadagnino does the next movie, he wants to capture the nuances of that love because it’s very absolute. They don’t forget, they cannot put it behind them, they have other lives, but [the love] is there and it’s not going away.”


« Last Edit: December 25, 2017, 12:43:16 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Again,  reference this--





"Call Me By Your Name, expected to be one of this year’s Oscar favorites, came together because of a botched vacation. It started in April 2005, when André Aciman’s plans to take his wife and three sons to a Mediterranean villa fell through. Frustrated, the Upper West Side novelist and City University of New York professor started writing a love story set on the Italian Riviera in the mid-1980s--"





--go back read this--

Just wonderful!








What was it like seeing your characters enacted on screen? Were there any surprises?

AA: It was simply gratifying. I never felt that they were alien to the book. I never felt that “Gee, this is strange, this doesn’t feel like the story I wrote or the characters I wrote about.” Rather what I kept thinking—and maybe this was tickling to my ego—I can’t believe that the pages I struggled over on the Upper West Side of Manhattan during a very hot and humid summer could have generated this amazingly beautiful film filled with so much longing and beautiful characters.




Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name--Whispers of steamy gay sex scenes and piercing performances from the cast.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Oh my--look at this--



https://nypost.com/2017/11/20/call-me-by-your-name-author-dont-be-afraid-of-same-sex-crushes/


Call Me by Your Name  author:
Don’t be afraid of same-sex crushes
By Christian Gollayan
November 20, 2017 | 5:32pm



André Aciman, author of Call Me By Your Name, played a cameo role in the film adaptation (right).
Photo Sigrid Estrada




Opening in New York Friday, the film stars Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet as the star-crossed lovers. Aciman, who has a brief cameo as Elio’s family’s friend, says he hopes the story’s same-sex romance will resonate with everyone.

“This is the biggest secret of humanity,” he says. “Everybody assumes that if they suddenly have a stirring for the same sex that it’s only them … that nobody feels this way, but we all do.”






--and then look at the dedication page of the book--



For Albio,
Alma de mi vida



(Soul of my life)



or should that be--

Cor Cordium (Heart of Hearts)--??




So--who is--or was-- Albio?? Elio and Oliver, Albio and André?? Oh my!!  :o :o

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Oliver is the archetypal American, cocky and athletic; the strapping Armie Hammer is perfect for the part. Timothée Chalamet as Elio is a virtuoso of subtle expression; his face flits through a whirlwind of emotions every time Oliver’s nearby, masked by a desperate attempt to play it cool.






https://nypost.com/2017/11/20/armie-hammer-makes-call-me-by-your-name-a-masterpiece/


Armie Hammer makes
Call Me by Your Name
a masterpiece
Call Me By Your Name is a dreamscape of sunshine, kindness, sensuality and music

Italicious:
★★★★
By Sara Stewart
November 20, 2017 | 5:30pm



Armie Hammer plays Oliver and Timothée Chalamet is Elio in Call Me by Your Name.



In a week when many of us will take dutiful trips to visit family, consider a two-hour vacation: Call Me By Your Name  is a dreamscape of sunshine, kindness, sensuality and music. Plus, leafy orchards, al fresco dinner parties, charming Italian town squares — and the agony and ecstasy of first love.

Based on the novel by André Aciman, the film is set in 1983 in northern Italy. Graduate student Oliver (Armie Hammer) is spending a summer residency studying Greco-Roman antiquities at the home of a professor (Michael Stuhlbarg), his wife (Amira Casar) and their 17-year-old son, Elio (Timothée Chalamet). Their villa is academic shabby-chic, with art and books on every surface, doors banging and window sills peeling, and even an old-fashioned dinner bell.

Oliver is the archetypal American, cocky and athletic; the strapping Hammer is perfect for the part. Elio, slighter and more introverted, is a skilled pianist who initially rolls his eyes at their brash houseguest — “the usurper,” he mutters to his girlfriend Marzia (Esther Garrel) as Oliver is given Elio’s bedroom — but can’t hide a growing fascination.

The professor and Oliver’s work with ancient statues is slyly juxtaposed with the lithe, near-constantly shirtless young men’s bodies, subconsciously posing for one another on the lawn, by the pool and through the door adjoining their bedrooms. Chalamet is a virtuoso of subtle expression; his face flits through a whirlwind of emotions every time Oliver’s nearby, masked by a desperate attempt to play it cool. Despite their seven-year age difference, the two are well-matched intellectually, and at times Elio seems the more urbane, casually shifting between English, French and Italian. When they finally touch, under Oliver’s guise of “just bros” athleticism, the sensuality in the air spikes off the charts. One particular scene that’s gained some advance notoriety involves masturbation and a peach; it’s juicy in every way, a gently kinky ode to Elio’s blossoming sexuality.

Director Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love) filmed in Crema, the Italian town he lives in, and you can feel his love for the place: The joy of plunging into an icy pond on a hot day, stopping at a random country house to ask for a glass of water, old men playing cards in the local bar. It’s all set to a rapturous, wide-ranging soundtrack: classical piano, the Psychedelic Furs, bittersweet new songs from Sufjan Stevens.

Stuhlbarg and Casar are sort of fantasy Euro parents: Affectionate and smart, they’re close enough to their son that he’ll ask them for girlfriend advice, but wise enough to sit back and watch his relationship with Oliver develop. For all the transcendent moments between the lovers — and the actors truly have a smoldering chemistry — the most indelible scene may be Stuhlbarg’s speech to his son about savoring the joy and grief of love.

Call this movie by its name: Masterpiece.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The movie is bound to be compared to such recent gay film landmarks as Brokeback Mountain, Carol  and the Oscar-winning Moonlight. But this masterpiece goes its own transcendent way. With Oliver, Elio feels he can talk about "things that matter." The beauty part is that these "things" matter to all of us, regardless of sexual orientation, when we're gutted for the first time by that thing called love. As Elio's father says of the art he studies, "there's not a straight line in any of these statues; they're all curved, as if daring you to desire them." Call Me by Your Name  dares its audience in the same way. It's a swooning new classic and one of the very best films of the year.




http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/reviews/peter-travers-call-me-by-your-name-is-sexiest-film-of-2017-w512240



Call Me by Your Name
Steamy Tale of First Love Is Sexiest Film of 2017
Luca Guadagnino's sensual, passionate story of two young men discovering romance in Italy is an instant romantic classic
★★★★
by Peter Travers
Monday 20 November 2017 4:00PM



All praise to Stuhlbarg, who is poetic and profound in a crucial scene of empathy in which a father openly encourages his son to follow
his true nature, risks be damned: Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name.




Here's the movie of the year for incurable romantics, a rapturous ode to first love that sweeps you up on waves of dizzying eroticism and then sweetly, emphatically leaves you emotionally shattered. For almost a year, Call Me by Your Name – the latest from Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash), a master cinema sensualist – has been a sensation on the film festival circuit. Now this ravishment of image and sound finally goes into wide release. You do not want to miss it.

Set in northern Italy in the summer of 1983, this love story transports you to a place where passion and memory collide. Elio Perlman (a flawless Timothée Chalamet; remember the name) is 17, multilingual, musically gifted and skilled at flirting with the local girls near the villa of his parents – an American professor (Michael Stuhlbarg) and his translator wife (Amira Casar). Then an intern arrives from the U.S. to assist his father with research into Greco-Roman culture. He's Oliver (Armie Hammer), 24, a handsome, athletic charmer and an outrageous flirt. At first, the slender Elio is irritated by the visitor's attention-grabbing body and his American slang, always saying "later" instead of goodbye. Then an attraction develops, slowly, fiercely and irrevocably.

At first, Elio and Oliver dance cautiously around their unspoken attraction. On a bike trip to the town square, they make teasing loops toward and away from each other. Stopping at a war monument, with the camera observing them at a distance, Elio and Oliver can't yet verbalize the magnetism their bodies can't help making plain. The yearning is almost palpable, with both men running off with local girls as a means to test the other. Sex is everywhere in this Italian Eden, where a swim, a hot glance or a stroll among the apricot trees has the impact of an aphrodisiac. But the bond between Elio and Oliver goes deeper. The older man waits for the younger one to make the initial move, and when it happens the floodgates of carnality and confusion open wide. Kudos to Guadagnino and screenwriter James Ivory – 88 and still alive to the thrill of nuance – for giving these scenes time to play out and resonate. Exploitation isn't the point here; connection is. "Call me by your name and I'll call you by mine," says Oliver, seeking an intimacy beyond the physical.

Bring out the superlatives to describe the prizeworthy performances of the lead actors, who instill their roles with fire, feeling and flashing humor. You may be shocked by what the duo do to a juicy peach, but you can bet on those stolen moments earn their place in the sex-in-cinema time capsule. Still, it's the film's wisdom and nurturing compassion that stay with you. What Elio and Oliver discover in each other opens their eyes to a world beyond themselves. Hammer (The Social Network, J. Edgar) is a revelation, giving his most complex screen role to date the tightrope thrill of full immersion. And Chalamet, who can also be seen right now seducing Saoirse Ronan in Lady Bird, is nothing less than the acting discovery of the year. Watch as the ends credits roll and he holds the camera in reactive closeups that will wreck you. And all praise to Stuhlbarg, who is poetic and profound in a crucial scene of empathy in which a father openly encourages his son to follow his true nature, risks be damned.

Working from André Aciman's justly acclaimed 2007 novel, Guadagnino revels in the pleasures of the flesh without losing touch with thought and feeling, while the gifted cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom covers this garden of temptations in seductive light and shadow. The film's emotions are as naked as its bodies. In the book, Elio and Oliver meet again after 20 years. In the film, Guadagnino shows us only what is; it's up to audiences to take the film home and keep it close.

The movie is bound to be compared to such recent gay film landmarks as Brokeback Mountain, Carol  and the Oscar-winning Moonlight. But this masterpiece goes its own transcendent way. With Oliver, Elio feels he can talk about "things that matter." The beauty part is that these "things" matter to all of us, regardless of sexual orientation, when we're gutted for the first time by that thing called love. As Elio's father says of the art he studies, "there's not a straight line in any of these statues; they're all curved, as if daring you to desire them." Call Me by Your Name  dares its audience in the same way. It's a swooning new classic and one of the very best films of the year.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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https://www.popsugar.com/entertainment/Oliver-Swimsuit-Detail-Call-Me-Your-Name-44286047



POPSUGAR  Oliver's Swimsuit Detail in Call Me by Your Name
How Call Me by Your Name
Leaves Tiny Breadcrumbs For Lovers of the Book

by RYAN ROSCHKE
November 20, 2017






Call Me by Your Name  hits theaters on Nov. 24, telling the tale of a powerful romance between two men during a fleeting Summer in Italy. The new film is an adaptation of the 2007 novel of the same name by André Aciman. While there are overt aspects of the film that really help it shine — the remarkable performances of fresh face Timothée Chalamet and the lovely Armie Hammer and the dreamy soundtrack are immediate standouts — there's plenty of beauty to be found in the film's smaller details.

Having read the book, I couldn't help but notice a small detail that seemed to bleed into the onscreen adaptation. The paradoxical nature of the detail is that it informs Oliver's character, but it's not ever directly mentioned in the film. So, if you haven't read the book, it goes right over your head. In the many swimming scenes, Oliver (Hammer) wears swimsuits of varying colors. Sometimes, he's in green. Sometimes, yellow.









The thing is, Oliver's choice of swimsuit color is, allegedly, supposed to give away what's going on inside his head. In the novel, Elio develops a little theory about Oliver's swimsuits. Whatever color he's wearing on any given day directly informs how he might act.

He had, it took me a while to realize, four personalities depending on what bathing suit he was wearing. Knowing which to expect gave me the illusion of a slight advantage. Red: bold, set in his ways, very grown-up, almost gruff and ill-tempered — stay away. Yellow: sprightly, buoyant, funny, not without barbs — don't give in too easily; might turn to red in no time. Green, which he seldom wore: acquiescent, eager to learn, eager to speak, sunny — why wasn't he always like this? Blue: the afternoon he stepped into my room from the balcony, the day he massaged my shoulder, or when he picked up my glass and placed it right next to me.

Contrary to the book, Oliver is actually wearing a green swimsuit in the scene where he tries to give Elio (Chalamet) a shoulder message. It's the same scene as the one that appears in the official trailer, when Oliver is playing volleyball while Elio's friend Marzia says, "He's better than the guy who came last year." Even so, you can see how the "green" Oliver described in the book matches the Oliver in the scene. Here, Oliver initiates contact with Elio. He's open-hearted, vulnerable, and testing the waters. He tries to create some kind of connection, both physical and emotional, which Elio (literally) shrugs off.

In a later scene, Oliver asks Elio to play some music for him on the piano. Here, wearing a yellow swimsuit, Oliver seems to be feeling out the interaction with Elio, and cautiously so. There are plenty of other swimsuit scenes sprinkled throughout the movie, and each time, it's fun to use the swimsuits as a way of placing Oliver emotionally.









Recently, I sat down for an interview with the film's visionary director, Luca Guadagnino. When I asked about the swimsuits, he admitted that there was a rhyme and reason to Oliver's colors in the film. "In the script before my last one before shooting, there was a lot of routine about the swim[suit]s, and there was a voiceover talking about how the swim[suit] changed the character of Oliver, the way he behaved. But again, I left just touches of the colors. And we did the same with other stuff. Touches. Little touches that can encompass a texture, but not too much literality."

With this admission, Guadagnino opens a whole new realm of possibilities for interpreting the film. Sure, there's a beautiful, budding romance on the surface. But underneath, there are layers and layers that depict the small breadcrumbs that portray the kind of love anyone is lucky to experience at least once. It's details like this that will have fans returning to watch the film again and again.











The Semiotics of the Bathing Suit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semiotics














by @CuZn34



He had, it took me a while to realize, four personalities depending on which bathing suit he was wearing. Knowing which to expect gave me the illusion of a slight advantage. Red: bold, set in his ways, very grown up, almost gruff and ill-tempered--stay away. Yellow: sprightly, buoyant, funny, not without barbs--don't give in too easily; might turn to Red in no time. Green, which he seldom wore: acquiescent, eager to learn, eager to speak, sunny--why wasn't he always like this? Blue: the afternoon he stepped into my room from the balcony, the day he massaged my shoulder, or when he picked up my glass and placed it right next to me.


Today was Red: he was hasty, determined, snappy.




CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @CuZn34
https://twitter.com/CuZn34


Sep 16 2017 11 Likes







by @sirayy


When he came down for breakfast he was wearing my bathing suit. No one would have given it another thought since everyone was always swapping suits in our house, but this was the first time he had done so and it was the same suit I had worn that very dawn when we'd gone for a swim. Watching him wearing my clothes was an un-bearable turn-on. And he knew it. It was turning both of us on.




Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman
Recited/Narrated by Armie Hammer




CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy




Sep 21, 2017 6 Notes, 410 Likes

« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 07:48:06 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"