Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 240554 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
https://twitter.com/mellowbeat__


by @mellowbeat__

어머나 이게 뭐람  
Gosh I'm clumsy 🍑




CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @mellowbeat__

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3:51 PM - 17 Dec 2017 1 Likes

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName #laterpeaches  #🍑
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva
#timothée chalamet  #armie hammer  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #artwork #artist #illustration #movie still



















CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
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by @sirayy

Peachy

CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
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3:12 PM Oct 15, 2017 24 Notes, 363 Likes










CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://jgiampietro.tumblr.com/


by JGiampietro


I love the book and can’t wait for the movie.
I had to draw them!






CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by JGiampietro
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Oct 7, 2017 47 Notes

« Last Edit: December 18, 2017, 09:15:33 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Portrayed with a note-perfect combination of cocky self-assurance and wary naiveté by Timothée Chalamet, Elio is something of an extension of the actor’s hilariously pretentious character in the recent film Lady Bird — another teenager with pedantic ideas about his own depth and seriousness. But while James Ivory and Luca Guadagnino aren’t afraid to wink at Elio’s youthful lack of self-awareness, they never stoop to ridiculing it: Like Armie Hammer’s Oliver, whose own seeming shallowness masks a surprisingly observant, compassionate nature, they’re patient and indulgent with a stage of life that can seem laughable, enviable and excruciatingly painful all at the same time.





https://www.washingtonpost.com/goingoutguide/movies/call-me-by-your-name-a-summer-love-recognizable-in-any-country-in-any-era/2017/12/14/56ddad76-d47b-11e7-a986-d0a9770d9a3e_story.html


Call Me by Your Name
is among the best movies of the year
★★★★
by Ann Hornaday
December 14 2017



Far more than just a pretty face:  Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer) in Luca Guadagnino's Call Me by Your Name




The pleasures of art, music, food, natural beauty and sexual awakening are evoked and celebrated in Call Me By Your Name, an almost sinfully enjoyable movie that both observes and obeys the languid rhythms of a torrid Italian summer.

Set in the early 1980s, Luca Guadagnino's adaptation of André Aciman's 2007 novel barely counts as a period piece, although the short shorts and tube socks Armie Hammer wears to play his smart-jock protagonist put the story squarely in the past. Still, the themes of longing, desire and self-definition are nothing if not timeless. Here, a young man’s coming-of-age is given such tactile, emotionally resonant immediacy that it would be recognizable in any country, of any era.

The young man in question is Elio (Timothée Chalomet), the 17-year-old son of an archaeology professor (Michael Stuhlbarg) who has hired an American student named Oliver (Hammer) to be his assistant for the summer. As a typically self-absorbed teenager, Elio at first seems barely aware of Oliver’s presence, being far more interested in his on-and-off girlfriend, reading and pursuing compositional musings on the guitar and piano. For his part, Oliver embodies a purely American brand of unbridled appetite and unselfconscious confidence that strikes an immediate awkward note within Elio’s casually cosmopolitan family. Soon, though, the household reaches its own pleasant rhythm, with the two young men — about seven years apart in age — gravitating toward one another as friends and, eventually, more.

Before readers look up the Italian word for “problematic,” let it be noted that it is Elio, not Oliver, who is the pursuer in Call Me By Your Name, which was written for the screen by James Ivory. Balancing the objectification of its leading men with discretion and delicacy, this is a film that acknowledges the purity and sculptural beauty of youth — Greek aesthetics, philosophy and ideals of male friendship are invoked early and often — but never at the expense of a character who, on the cusp of manhood, possesses his own agency and desires, despite their sometimes shaky parameters.

Portrayed with a note-perfect combination of cocky self-assurance and wary naiveté by Chalamet, Elio is something of an extension of the actor’s hilariously pretentious character in the recent film Lady Bird — another teenager with pedantic ideas about his own depth and seriousness. But while Ivory and Guadanigno aren’t afraid to wink at Elio’s youthful lack of self-awareness, they never stoop to ridiculing it: Like Oliver, whose own seeming shallowness masks a surprisingly observant, compassionate nature, they’re patient and indulgent with a stage of life that can seem laughable, enviable and excruciatingly painful all at the same time.

The plot of Call Me By Your Name  isn’t particularly novel. Its contours are familiar to anyone who can remember their own sentimental education, or that of their favorite literary hero. What sets his movie apart are the flavors, feelings and fleeting glimpses of attraction that find as much erotic tension in a volleyball game or alfresco lunch as in sparring over a Bach cantata. The villa where much of Call Me By Your Name  transpires, with its lush fruit orchards and burnished, offhanded refinement, feels less like a stage set than a summer home seen through a particularly revealing (but circumspect) keyhole.

Anyone who has seen Guadanigno’s previous films, including I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash understands his gift for creating environments, often drenched in extravagant colors and textures; his staging and pacing are just as sensuously seductive, drawing viewers into a world that seems simultaneously realistic and dreamlike in its detail and pictorial richness.

Call Me By Your Name  finds the director marshaling those gifts in service to a spellbinding, almost ecstatically beautiful movie that gains even more heft and meaning in its final transcendent moments. What had been a two-hander featuring sensitive, flawlessly judged performances by Chalamet and Hammer expands into something more, and the audience realizes that the entire film could be interpreted as an elegant exercise in misdirection. Call Me By Your Name  may exemplify well-tempered cinema at its most balanced and attractive, but it’s far more than just a pretty face.


R.  At area theaters. Contains sexuality, nudity and some coarse language. 132 minutes.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2017, 12:52:39 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Maybe all the rest of this extraordinary film—a summer spent in Italy, a knight asleep in your own bed, freedom achieved from regressive social mores—can be chalked up to the stuff of fantasy. But Elio’s relationship with his parents, and their intuition, understanding, and complete emotional support as awakens to his sexuality, hits much closer to home. Portrayals of young queer people and their parents, from Ma Vie En Rose  to Pariah, are generally fraught with pain and rejection, or at minimum deal with the struggles of acceptance. For so many, the truth is far worse: an estimated 40 percent of homeless youth are LGBTQ kids rejected by their families.





https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/d3dapx/where-was-call-me-by-your-name-when-i-was-17


Where Was
Call Me by Your Name
When I Was 17?
Of all the film's achievements, telling the story of a first queer love that isn't filled with shame
or rejection may be its finest—and one I could have used during my own queer adolescence.


by Naveen Kumar
Nov 27 2017, 6:30pm



A summer spent in Italy, a knight asleep in your own bed:  Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer) in Call Me by Your Name




Partway through Call Me By Your Name, which hit theaters Friday and may be the best queer film of the year, 17-year-old Elio nestles on the couch with his parents as his mother reads from a 16th century fairy tale. It’s about a knight torn over whether to confess his love to a princess: “Is it better to speak or to die?” he asks. The question hovers over Elio; though he hardly knows it himself, his parents can already see that he’s falling in love for the first time. We don’t yet know whether Elio (Timothée Chalomet) or Oliver (Armie Hammer), the 24-year-old American student visiting the family’s villa in Italy for the summer, is the knight or the princess. But it’s clear that what’s unfolding between them is a storybook romance.

And holy shit, is it beautiful. I don’t just mean the sun-dipped Italian countryside where Elio and Oliver spend languid summer days around the pool, or Luca Guadagnino’s delicate direction, or the stunning performances at the center of the film, or even the simple joy of watching Armie Hammer flail about to The Psychedelic Furs at the town disco. The film broadens the novel it’s based on into a paragon of homoerotic discovery, as ideal as the ancient statues Elio’s father, an American professor of Greco-Roman arts, pulls up from the sea to study.

Unlike so many other movies about romance between men, from Brokeback Mountain  to Stranger by the Lake, the love that develops between Elio and Oliver isn’t marked by derision, violence, or the consequences of breaking with hetero norms. In fact, despite their difference in age and the early-80s setting, their relationship is hardly transgressive at all—least of all to Elio’s parents. Elio’s sexual coming of age, from his first kiss to his first time, is one that anyone could wish for, a near-Platonic ideal. All of which heralds Call Me By Your Name  as a watershed moment in queer cinema.

And for all the same reasons, it’s almost painful to watch, too.

Straight people, of course, are used to seeing idealized portrayals of their past or potential sex lives on screen. But I've never seen anything like this. Personally, I didn’t know what to do with myself when I saw it. This was the first idealized gay coming-of-age narrative I’d ever seen, and it made my heart swell. But it also made me reflect on how far from ideal my own list of firsts had been. The pleasures of finally getting a Call Me By Your Name  were mixed with the ache of looking back at my own experience through a new lens.

Nearly every aspect of queer experience depicted in the film feels calibrated to smooth over the challenges gay men have faced. On the coast of Northern Italy in 1983, before the AIDS epidemic had reached a fever pitch that would come to associate gay sex with death and disease, Elio and Oliver are immersed in a world of music and art. Their courtship is one of ideas, a dance between intellects. The vigor of their young bodies is on display too, an eroticism echoed in the ancient art studied by Elio’s father. Just as Ancient Greece held up love between men as the highest ideal, to Elio’s intellectual parents, the love between their son and Oliver is more than natural; it’s beautiful and something to be cherished.

As heat between them builds, Elio isn’t content to torment himself over his desire, as so many queer adolescents might. He is the knight who eventually speaks his love to the princess: He gets horny and frustrated. He fools around and loses his virginity to a girl. He jerks off. He sticks his face in an empty pair of Oliver’s old swim trunks. And when he’s driven to write furiously in his journal, he isn't grappling with some existential sense of shame—it’s just the normal scribbles of a teenage crush, which is remarkable to see in itself when that boy’s crush is on a man.

Even the movie’s resistance to showing Elio’s first time on screen, a fact some critics have lamented, or making clear which position he takes—though it’s assumed that he bottoms, as in the novel—fits with its overall glossing of gay experience into a high sheen. Yes, gay sex involves negotiation, doing something that might seem unnatural the first time around, and no small amount of pain. We already know this. What we do see as they begin to play around is Oliver ask Elio, “Are you okay?” and “Does this make you happy?” And we later see Oliver assure him, when Elio’s raging libido drives him to fuck a peach, that he’s not some sick freak for feeling overwhelmed by lust.

The pinnacle of this fairy tale, aside from a scene that finds its two main characters drunk and literally dancing in the streets, is the self-assurance inherent to doing as its title asks. “Call me by your name, and I’ll call you by mine,” Oliver whispers to Elio as they lay tangled up in bed, their first night together creeping into the early morning hours. Nothing could be further from feeling ashamed of your desire than calling out your name in the face of your lover's. Can you imagine feeling that way at 17? After your first time? I still can’t, and I’ve lived twice as long.

Maybe all the rest of this extraordinary film—a summer spent in Italy, a knight asleep in your own bed, freedom achieved from regressive social mores—can be chalked up to the stuff of fantasy. But Elio’s relationship with his parents, and their intuition, understanding, and complete emotional support as awakens to his sexuality, hits much closer to home. Portrayals of young queer people and their parents, from Ma Vie En Rose  to Pariah, are generally fraught with pain and rejection, or at minimum deal with the struggles of acceptance. For so many, the truth is far worse: an estimated 40 percent of homeless youth are LGBTQ kids rejected by their families.

“Remember that I’m here,” Elio’s father tells him after Oliver heads home as summer ends. Many parents would wish their love away, the professor admits, and his own father would have carted him off. Then he offers his son the kind of validation and wisdom that so many queer people spend their whole lives searching for, having never found it at home: That the bond he shared with Oliver was rare and special and something to savor. That love, however fleeting, should never be taken for granted. That hearts only have so much fire in them—so tend to the blaze, even when it breaks.

I’m not sure how I might have felt, or what fantasies about my romantic life I might have been inspired to dream up, had Call Me By Your Name  come out when I was Elio’s age. Maybe it was better not having a movie like this to compare to my keg-party first kiss (did that even count?), or to the first night I spent crammed into a single bed with a boy in my dorm, who seemed genuinely pissed (at me?) when he didn’t last very long. Without a film like this to watch growing up, I only felt estranged from my straight peers and the love stories they devoured (go ahead and let go of that board, Jack). There was nothing to show me what I was missing.

If straight fairy tales throw obstacles between straight lovers—witches, curses, sinking ships—then maybe a queer one takes away the real ones so many of us face every day, so we can see, perhaps for the first time, a world without so much standing in the way of love.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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It is incredibly pleasant to spend a couple of hours with characters as unashamedly smart as this. It is rare these days to find English-speaking characters who revel in the pleasures of intellectual discussion, who celebrate each other’s braininess. Languages in this household freely intermingle and people lie down and read to each other; poets and philosophers are quoted and questioned. It feels like a universe away, a better place, and a most wonderful one for these two smart, intriguing people to come together.




Broadcast recording starts at 7:55
Recording gives much more than the
printed précis below; worth hearing:


http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/nightlife/cjs-film-reviews/9258436



Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Call Me by Your Name
★★★★
Review by CJ Johnson
Duration: 7:55 - 12:05
Broadcast: Wed 13 Dec 2017, 10:00pm



Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name.



Timothée Chalamet gives a superb, award-deserving performance as a seventeen-year-old “Jewish French Italian American” young man falling in love for the first time in Luca Guadagnino’s sensuous, languid, romantic and well-crafted Call Me by Your Name. Chalamet himself is American/French, speaks French fluently, and spent his summers as a boy in France, so his casting here represents a kind of divine providence. He is the right actor in the right role at the right time and he nails it.

He plays Elio, who lives in a gorgeous villa in Lombardia, Italy with his parents and a couple of household staff. Each summer his academic father (Michael Stuhlbarg) hosts a research assistant; this year - 1983 - it is Oliver (Armie Hammer), a brashly confident American scholar. Over the summer, Elio and Oliver fall in love.

This isn’t Brokeback Vineyard. Oliver and Elio are not - at least, on the surface - fumbling, self-hating deniers, and they’re untroubled by any tangible outside dangers, including bigotry. Indeed, they are both cool. Oliver enchants the whole town with his rather astounding physical presence but his cool goes deeper than that; it’s in how he walks, how he wears the subtly brilliant period-specific summer clothing. He’s deeply dorky when he dances ‘80s-style, but that just somehow adds to his cool. Likewise, Chalamet’s Elio starts the film awkwardly but Oliver awakens some inner cool within him, and soon he’s smoking cigarettes as suavely as the older man.

It is incredibly pleasant to spend a couple of hours with characters as unashamedly smart as this. It is rare these days to find English-speaking characters who revel in the pleasures of intellectual discussion, who celebrate each other’s braininess. Languages in this household freely intermingle and people lie down and read to each other; poets and philosophers are quoted and questioned. It feels like a universe away, a better place, and a most wonderful one for these two smart, intriguing people to come together.

The film feels too long for its story, which, while it may contain multitudes of feeling and intimate detail, is essentially a simple one. But it is charming in spades, and, as captured in Chalamet’s performance, an essential addition to the coming-of-age canon. The final shot lodges it there with amazing grace.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
RELEASE DATES


UK             27 October 2017   
Ireland       27 October 2017   
USA           24 November 2017   (New York and Los Angeles)*   
Canada       8 December 2017   
Thailand    14 December 2017   (limited)
Sweden     22 December 2017
USA          22 December 2017  (Boston, Philadelphia, Minneapolis and etc.)*   
Australia    26 December 2017
USA          12 January 2017     (Detroit and Indianapolis)*   
Brazil        18 January 2018
Portugal    18 January 2018
USA          19 January 2017     (NATIONWIDE)*
Italy          25 January 2018
Finland      26 January 2018
Norway     26 January 2018
Poland      26 January 2018
Denmark    1 February 2018
Greece       8 February 2018
Spain       16 February 2018
France      28 February 2018
Hong Kong 1 March 2018
Germany    1 March 2018
Switzerland 1 March 2018   (German Speaking Region)
Czechia    22 March 2018
Japan           April 2018
S. Korea       Spring 2018 ??


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5726616/releaseinfo?linkId=43379176




USA*



« Last Edit: December 21, 2017, 08:55:38 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline southendmd

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CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
RELEASE DATES


USA           22 December 2017 (Boston, Philadelphia, Minneapolis and etc.)*   



Finally!  Although, it's actually opening today.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Finally!  Although, it's actually opening today.


BOSTON, I feel your pain!  :laugh: :laugh:

Well, at long last--and look, what a nice review! (Although, what does he mean, 3 1/2 stars--the very idea!!   >:( :laugh: )






Call Me By Your Name  is frank about adolescent love and lust — the ecstasies, jealousies, melodrama, and pain. As in his earlier movies, I Am Love  (2009) and A Bigger Splash  (2015), Luca Guadagnino amps up the ripeness of the European setting. The sunlight on the landscape glows as if seen for the first time, and the dinners and al fresco lunches fire a viewer’s senses. Food is sex in this movie — in one scene quite literally — and food is language and history (Oliver gives a brief etymology of the word “apricot” at one point), and love and sex have histories that go back millennia. The soundtrack yearns with a mix of classical, minimal, period-’80s and Sufjan Stevens originals, and the casual beauty of shirtless young men is echoed in the bronze statues Elio’s father pulls from the local waters. This is a film fully of heart, hormones, and mind.





https://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/movies/2017/12/20/call-your-name-full-light-and-landscape-and-unstoppable-beauty/7ja10O1izBhKOQrE0BuKoO/story.html


Call Me by Your Name
is full of light and landscape
and unstoppable beauty

★★★1/2
by Ty Burr
[email protected]

December 20 2017



With nostalgia but gratitude and a lingering sense of loss:  Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer) in Call Me by Your Name




The director Luca Guadagnino specializes in tales of trouble in paradise — of high-living hedonists in sinfully sensuous settings — but with Call Me By Your Name, he broadens his embrace of humanity while hitting new heights of cinematic bliss. A richly detailed sexual and emotional coming of age story, the movie’s based on a novel and it unfolds novelistically, through glances and asides and slowly accreting observations. You don’t fully realize that the youth at the story’s center has grown into a complex and confident young man until the film’s remarkable final shot.

The boy, Elio (Timothée Chalomet), is an American in Italy, living with his father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an antiquities professor, and Italian mother (Amira Casar). He’s 17 when the film opens, part kid, part bored teenager, an adult in chrysalis. The setting is the Lombardy region of northern Italy in high summer, simultaneously bursting with new life and as ancient as the bygone empires. The boy fools around with local friends and dabbles in flirtation and more with a girl named Marzia (Esther Garrel). Then his dad’s new research assistant turns up, and the movie halts in its tracks.

His name is Oliver (Armie Hammer). It’s the mid-1980s, and Oliver’s a familiar type, breezy and preppie and as rebellious as only a well-to-do 20-something American can be. The local girls are smitten, and he knows it. Elio is contemptuous at first — the interloper has taken over his bedroom, for one thing — and then angrily fascinated, and then honestly attracted, each step a conversation with himself that makes him feel more certain rather than less. By the time he and Oliver dare to start circling the subject in earnest, Elio is leading the dance.

Call Me By Your Name  is frank about adolescent love and lust — the ecstasies, jealousies, melodrama, and pain. As in his earlier movies, I Am Love  (2009) and A Bigger Splash  (2015), Guadagnino amps up the ripeness of the European setting. The sunlight on the landscape glows as if seen for the first time, and the dinners and al fresco lunches fire a viewer’s senses. Food is sex in this movie — in one scene quite literally — and food is language and history (Oliver gives a brief etymology of the word “apricot” at one point), and love and sex have histories that go back millennia. The soundtrack yearns with a mix of classical, minimal, period-’80s and Sufjan Stevens originals, and the casual beauty of shirtless young men is echoed in the bronze statues Elio’s father pulls from the local waters. This is a film fully of heart, hormones, and mind.

There are times when the tempo dawdles, as if unwilling to leave the table. You may wish for more conflict. Call Me By Your Name  has its own agenda and its studied, summery pace is almost entirely a virtue. André Aciman's novel has been adapted by the venerable director James Ivory (Howards End) and it has an air of wistful but clear-minded looking back. The film’s point of view is Elio’s (and to a lesser extent Oliver’s), but one gets hints that the actual narrator is an older, unseen Elio, contemplating the summer that defined him not with nostalgia but gratitude and a lingering sense of loss.

You may not realize how strong the acting is until you replay the movie in your head later. And strong across the board, from Stuhlbarg and Casar as the kindest of possible parents (the former has a superb setpiece monologue toward the end) and Garrel as a betrayed but resilient playmate, to Hammer’s tricky portrayal of a sexual and romantic mentor who’s both more experienced and more naive than his younger lover.

Chalamet’s performance is even more subtle and organic, and you can only take its full measure by comparing Elio at the start of Call Me By Your Name  to the bruised but self-assured young man of the final scenes. The film may be a fantasy but it’s one that’s lovely and wise, where hurt only sharpens one’s thirst for life and where the hero and his audience awaken to the unstoppable beauty of the world in which we’re privileged to live.




Directed by Luca Guadagnino. Written by James Ivory, based on a novel by André Aciman. Starring Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, Esther Garrel, Amira Casar. At Kendall Square. 132 minutes. R (sexual content, nudity, some language). In English and Italian, with subtitles.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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And here's more--




Timothée Chalomet (as Elio) is a revelation, stunning with a superb performance that’s being named by many (this critic included) as the best of the year. He’s achingly real, presenting such authenticity in his awkwardness, naked want and devastation that it’s painful to watch. With Chalamet it’s the little moments to look for; he never makes the mistake of going big with emotions when a subtle blinking away of tears will do. It’s profound work, and he’s the pounding heart of the film. We find ourselves engrossed in our want for his ultimate happiness, something the film teases us with constantly. The work is nuanced, the way he leans in for affection, shutting down when he feels insecure and opening up once his flirtations are reciprocated.

Armie Hammer is equally fantastic as Oliver – statuesque and startlingly handsome, he’s doing his best work since his breakout in 2010’s The Social Network. While Elio is more inexperienced and flustered, Hammer finds the right note of vulnerability to play so we’re never led to believe the story is one sided. We may spend our time in Elio’s head, but Oliver’s longing is just as tangible.






http://www.cambridgeday.com/2017/12/20/call-me-by-your-name-its-summer-love-thats-as-beautiful-as-a-family-villa-in-italy/


Call Me by Your Name
It’s summer love that’s as beautiful
as a family villa in Italy


by Allyson Johnson
Wednesday, December 20 2017



What isn’t said, a silence shared between the two:  Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer) in Call Me by Your Name




So infrequently does a film as purposefully languid as this arouse such urgency in its audience. Call Me By Your Name, directed by Luca Guadagnino, asks viewers to allow themselves to become pliant and transported to a place and time not so far removed from our now, nudging us to yearn for love so tender and all-encompassing that it’s destined to break your heart.

The year is 1983, and the summer is well underway for 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalomet), something of a musical prodigy who lives with loving parents at their 17th century villa in Lombardy, Italy. His days are spent wandering the town, sparking a flirtation with a local girl, playing and composing music and reading. This all changers when his father, Mr. Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) invites his latest grad student, Oliver (Armie Hammer), to stay with them for six weeks. Initially annoyed with one another, then contemptuously fascinated, the two spark a passionate love affair as Elio continues to come into his own.

Guadagnino has an eye for fashionable, meticulous compositions but brings enough warmth to the screen to avoid looking like a magazine layout. The greens of the trees that engulf the villa burst, the lines of the characters’ bodies are captured expertly to showcase an easy titillation that thrums through the film, and the architecture of the household is both foreign and inviting. The frames capture an impatient sensuality, clawing both at Elio’s chest and the sun-baked corners of the screen. Chalamet walks in circles around Hammer, leans into him with abandon, nips at his shoulder before pacing away, unable to focus his attention, but the film is also patient as the two ride bikes through a field, content in watching them pass by the camera and into the distance. Cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom is the perfect partner to Guadagnino, who captures the romance of the story with a quiet confidence.

Chalamet is a revelation, stunning with a superb performance that’s being named by many (this critic included) as the best of the year. He’s achingly real, presenting such authenticity in his awkwardness, naked want and devastation that it’s painful to watch. With Chalamet it’s the little moments to look for; he never makes the mistake of going big with emotions when a subtle blinking away of tears will do. It’s profound work, and he’s the pounding heart of the film. We find ourselves engrossed in our want for his ultimate happiness, something the film teases us with constantly. The work is nuanced, the way he leans in for affection, shutting down when he feels insecure and opening up once his flirtations are reciprocated.

Hammer is equally fantastic as Oliver – statuesque and startlingly handsome, he’s doing his best work since his breakout in 2010’s The Social Network. While Elio is more inexperienced and flustered, Hammer finds the right note of vulnerability to play so we’re never led to believe the story is one sided. We may spend our time in Elio’s head, but Oliver’s longing is just as tangible.

The chemistry of the leads extends to the rest of the cast. Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar do tremendous work as Mr. and Mrs. Perlman. Stuhlbarg (having a banner year, considering he’s also in The Shape of Water) nearly runs away with the end of the film with a scene so full of affirmation, compassion and empathy that it could have been seen as too good to be true, especially set in the early 1980s. Stuhlbarg delivers it with just the right amount of tenderness, though, giving his grieving son a lifeline that’s comforting but honest.

Written by master scribe James Ivory and based on the novel by André Aciman, Call Me By Your Name  is languorous work, a special film that takes its time sinking its teeth into us, so subtle in its advances that we don’t realize how far gone we are until it’s too late. It’s astonishing just how explosively visceral the emotions of Elio and Oliver are, as they’re packaged in such a soulful manner. So much of the weight of the picture hangs on what isn’t said, a silence shared between the two made up for with physical proximity. Ivory proves vital, because he’s able to write into the pages the substance in the silence, and the performers follow.

As Sufjan Stevens sings over the end credits we’re struck by how powerful the journey has been, and how much has transpired in what feels too short a moment – just as Elio must feel. We are putty in the filmmakers’ hands, attached to the lives of these two strangers and transfixed by their impassioned love story. “I have touched you for the last time/Is it a video” Stevens sings and, in a later verse, “I have loved you for the last time.” It’s a striking reminder of the power of memory and the idea that love lost isn’t love wasted, a message that rings beautifully clear and universal no matter how singular and lasting the story of Elio and Oliver is.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

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At last, I saw a marquee that said, "Coming Soon: Call Me by Your Name"!!!!!!
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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At last, I saw a marquee that said, "Coming Soon: Call Me by Your Name"!!!!!!


I hope so, Lee!

In the meanwhile, in Denver:


Call Me by Your Name
opened today!

Mayan Theater
110 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Sloans Lake
4255 W Colfax Ave, Denver, CO 80204


 :o :D ;)

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"