Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 293088 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,590]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY34-Xohcug[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY34-Xohcug
This video has just been posted on YouTube today.
It probably will be taken down very soon. If you really want to see it, do it quickly!
(FYI, the loud crackling and popping sounds are from the large open fireplaces in the Living Room and Study)


SPOILER! This is the crucial
2:59 telephone scene--
IF YOU WANT TO WAIT
UNTIL YOU SEE THE MOVIE
DON'T WATCH THE VIDEO!
Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
with
Armie Hammer (on the other end of the telephone),
Michael Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar
Call Me by Your Name

All copyrighted material belongs their respective owners


Decaffeinated Bones
Published on Dec 27, 2017


« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 10:50:55 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,590]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nr7BTBwZoxU[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nr7BTBwZoxU/size]
This video has just been posted on YouTube today.
It probably will be taken down very soon. If you really want to see it, do it quickly!
This sad 3:12 scene is in three sections:
Oliver and Elio part wordlessly at the train station, then Elio's anguished phone call to his mother, Annella,
and Annella taking Elio home in the car.


SPOILER!
IF YOU WANT TO WAIT
UNTIL YOU SEE THE MOVIE
DON'T WATCH THE VIDEO!
Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
with
Armie Hammer - as Oliver
and
Amira Casar - as Annella

Call Me by Your Name

All copyrighted material belongs their respective owners


Decaffeinated Bones
Published on Dec 27, 2017









Peter Spears‏ @pjspears 7:39 AM - 28 Sep 2017
https://twitter.com/pjspears?lang=en

TBT. BTS Making movies. Italy 2016/1983 Call Me By Your Name



So, after seeing the movie at NYFF last night, I realized that, like Elio, I found that I had been faking being 'adult' for what seemed like years, and that, suddenly, I found myself unable to make my own way home, and, after feeding a gettone into the antiquated telephone, I needed to call Mom and ask her, tearfully, to pick me up from the station near Clusone, Bergamo.

I also need to see the four hour version of the movie right away, please. Without people who feel it 'necessary' to loudly applaud during the last shot with Timothée staring into the fire just because Luca quietly put the movie title in the lower left of the frame, so no one could hear Sufjan's singing, or figure out his lyrics. Thanks.



« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 03:30:48 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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On screen, Armie Hammer lives and breathes Oliver, who is an extremely complex character to read and to understand, seeming both flippant and contemplative. In a gesture as minute as the flicker of his eyes or the softening of creases around the mouth, Hammer captures Oliver’s confidence and his privilege as a young man navigating his way through youth, who is unafraid to express his vulnerability. Yet it is Timothée Chalamet, as the seventeen-year-old Elio, who gives a truly outstanding performance here; outstanding in that his presence is very ordinary, very modest, and with only slight alterations of body and facial expression, he can convey a vast range of impressions about his world. He plays piano gorgeously and riffs on the modes of composers, he reads, transcribes music and fills his conversation with references to philosophy, art and classical literature. He is in every way an intellectual equal to the scholarly Oliver, who says to him, “Is there nothing you don’t know?” The relevance here is that there is; Elio yearns for experiences in life and love.






https://fourthreefilm.com/2017/02/call-me-by-your-name/



BERLINALE 2017 Review
Call Me by Your Name

by ELOISE ROSS
FEBRUARY 25, 2017



Not simply a story of an introvert and an extrovert finding love with one another, but a portrait of desire:
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet and  in Luca Guadagnino's Call Me by Your Name









BERLIN -- The importance of the title Call Me by Your Name  comes rather late into Luca Guadagnino’s film, long after the narrative and sexual tension between its two leads has been established. It emerges as a phrase spoken at a moment of shared desire and risk, when one lover expresses something almost more powerful than love, and hopes that the other will be welcoming. New lovers Oliver (Armie Hammer) and Elio (Timothée Chalamet), exploring their feelings, call each other by their own names, and this verbal exchange of appellation brings them closer together, somehow invigorating their intimacy via an unconditional acceptance. This exchange also recalls their arrangement in the home, Elio having moved into an adjacent room as his father requested him to leave his bedroom their visitor. The two men are brought together not as equals, but their divide is clearly dismantled by their declaration of familiarity. The film, concerned with a group of beautiful people who are living exquisitely affluent lives —which has become typical of Guadagnino’s work—traces the lives of these two men amongst them. Its world premiere at Sundance Film Festival seemed an incongruous event, as refined as it is amidst a festival slate of typically indie films, thus it was fitting that Sony Pictures Classics bought the US theatrical rights prior to the festival’s commencement. No doubt, demand for this film will be great.

Set in Lombardy in 1983, where the Perlman family live in a beautiful seventeenth century palazzo home, Call Me by Your Name  focuses on 24-year-old Oliver, the present year’s intern invited by Mr. Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) for a summer of work, research and vacation. Elio’s father and mother Annella (Amira Casar) are loving and understanding parents, depicted as naturally warm and yet not immune to the gentle bickering that is becoming of a close family. Walking amongst ancient buildings and sun-drenched meadows, the Perlman family and their friends speak a transient combination of English, French and Italian. Thus Call Me by Your Name  becomes, after his most recent international successes I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash, another Guadagnino film distinctly concerned with the cinematic evocation of summer, of cosmopolitan delight, of warmth and light and the feeling of comfort that comes with these things. The warm air, bright sunlight, refreshing water of local lakes and palatial swimming holes all come alive in the director’s embrace, as these sensuous elements did in his earlier films. Close-up framings of peach orchards, stretches of grass, surfaces of water, generate a haptic texture, particularly when woven throughout the classical blocking and wide shots that define much of the rest of the film. While the characters’ time together is finite, and this knowledge is a weight over the entire film, the framing serves to suggest their immersion in the summer place.

With last year’s A Bigger Splash  having one of the best opening title sequences of 2016, Guadagnino is again putting himself forward as a contender with his title design. The film opens simply with close-ups of the face and torso of an ancient Greco-Roman sculpture, cracked and worn but clearly a giant of [his] time. This ancient slate is coloured with flashy, cursive lines as credit text in bright colours appears, dissonant but not disharmonious, which suggests that a declared respect for tradition will be brightened with some more playful contours. The sculpture’s significance comes later too, on one of Mr. Perlman’s archeological expeditions, as [he] is brought up from the bottom of a beautiful ocean plateau. The cinematography by Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, known for creating  slow, meditative cinematic moments with Apichatpong Weerasethakul in films such as Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives  and Blissfully Yours, displays the same characteristic control over its visual and sensory subject matter. Stylistically, this film is absolutely worthy of its grand romantic narrative.

Adapted from a 2007 novel by André Aciman, the screenplay—written by Guadagnino, editor Walter Fasano, and James Ivory—shares something of the slow desperation and unspoken desire of The Remains of the Day, the 1993 Kazuo Ishiguro adaptation directed by Ivory. The emotional orbits of each film are not dissimilar, considering the mutual understanding between two parties and a heartbreak almost too mundane to bear, but at a certain narrative point Call Me by Your Name  takes a different direction, introducing distinctly personal growth. Witnessing this sensitive character development is one of the pleasures of the film. On screen, Hammer lives and breathes Oliver, who is an extremely complex character to read and to understand, seeming both flippant and contemplative. In a gesture as minute as the flicker of his eyes or the softening of creases around the mouth, Hammer captures Oliver’s confidence and his privilege as a young man navigating his way through youth, who is unafraid to express his vulnerability. Yet it is Chalamet, as the seventeen-year-old Elio, who gives a truly outstanding performance here; outstanding in that his presence is very ordinary, very modest, and with only slight alterations of body and facial expression, he can convey a vast range of impressions about his world. He plays piano gorgeously and riffs on the modes of composers, he reads, transcribes music and fills his conversation with references to philosophy, art and classical literature. He is in every way an intellectual equal to the scholarly Oliver, who says to him, “Is there nothing you don’t know?” The relevance here is that there is; Elio yearns for experiences in life and love.

At first, Elio’s fascination with Oliver seems as though it might not be romantic attraction but a sort of jealous desire to be him, to have Oliver’s confidence. Watching, mesmerised, as Oliver dances with a woman at an outdoor nightclub—the Psychedelic Furs“Love My Way” pointedly serving as the soundtrack to the moment—Elio seems to wish he had the same dancing ability. After he notices Oliver’s thin gold chain bearing a Star of David pendant, Elio mentions that he also has one, and he begins to wear it. Whether it is out of a desire to be like Oliver, or from an encouragement that to bear his Jewishness was not taboo (“My mother says we are Jews of discretion,” Elio declares), the notion of self-acceptance is clear. Their sexual tension is understated, too, in their coy touches and in the glances between Oliver and Elio that are full of desire, but often inflected with a warm insolence, as though both teenager and adult are engaging in a childish and naïve flirting. Neither man knows whether to pursue consummation of his feelings, and Call Me by Your Name  spends a long time focusing on the relationship between two people who are at once getting to know each other, and at the same time shying behind an uncertainty of how to do so. One of the many beautiful things about this film, and definitely a cornerstone of its narrative and emotional poise, is Oliver’s urbanity, particular perhaps to a type of Jew from New England, that is visibly shaken when he navigates his feelings for Elio. A quote read from Marguerite of Navarre’s The Heptaméron, “Is it better to speak or to die,” is returned to by several characters and has a searing thematic resonance in the film. If it sounds like this could be too heavy-handed, it is not in Guadagnino’s skilled hands.

Sufjan Stevens, a lyricist whose song work is defined by its literary influences and thematic focus, provides two songs for the soundtrack that offer a choral commentary. These songs are interwoven with a selection of classical music, both within the story as played by characters, and as composed soundtrack that includes work by John Adams. This music accompanies significant events, but also composed shots of household sundries, like wet bathers in the sun, providing the mundane with a sense of romance and grandeur. A commonly quoted note of praise for Aciman is that he is, “an acute grammarian of desire,” and this is absolutely sustained in Guadagnino’s film.

Along with Mike Mills’ upcoming 20th Century Women, Call Me by Your Name  is one of the most honest reflections of human behaviour I have seen in years. Characters reach mutual understandings, sometimes with glances, sometimes with long discussions, sometimes with silences. Both Elio and Oliver begin their summer in Italy engaging in flirtations and sexual encounters with women; their discovery of each other becomes more than a discovery of love shared with another — on a deeper level, it is a discovery of themselves. This is not simply a story of an introvert and an extrovert finding love with one another, but a portrait of desire, told with Guadagnino’s unique and detailed attention to place.




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,590]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZBi8Xh7doA[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZBi8Xh7doA

Again, I like this video--simply
because it's lovely to remember
the wonderful images--


Wish You Were Here

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'Wish You Were Here' (2011)
(Avril Lavigne)



Let us just say that I was not okay after making this one.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use"
for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair
use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit,
educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.


Decaffeinated Bones
Published on Dec 27, 2017





And here's the original video:



[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VT1-sitWRtY[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VT1-sitWRtY

'Wish You Were Here' (2011)
(Avril Lavigne)


AvrilLavigneVEVO
Published on Sep 8, 2011





[/quote]
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,620]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ey8ugiHmGaw[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ey8ugiHmGaw

Very clever!

Kiss Me Hard Before You Go | Summertime Sadness | I Just Wanted You To Know
That Baby You're The Best

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Armie Hammer - as Oliver

Call Me by Your Name


'Summertime Sadness' (2012)
(Lana Del Rey)




“Later is better than never.”

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use"
for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair
use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit,
educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.


Laurel Chen
Published on Dec 26, 2017





And here's the original video:



[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdrL3QxjyVw[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdrL3QxjyVw

'Summertime Sadness' (2012)
(Lana Del Rey)


LanaDelReyVEVO
Published on Aug 23, 2013


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The two men bike together in town, flirt with some of the same girls, then gradually start flirting with each other. In many ways, they could not be less alike. Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is skinny and pasty, Oliver (Armie Hammer) is rusty blond, honeyed by the sun, athletic and the sort of fellow you see modeling sportswear in catalogs. But both are drawn to one another’s prickly intelligence and shared Jewish heritage. And, eventually, they wind up in bed and fall into a romance as sweet and ephemeral as an Italian summer.





http://artsatl.com/review-call-name-coming-age-film-filled-deep-joy-rich-insight/


Call Me by Your Name
is a coming-of-age film filled with deep joy and rich insight

by Steve Murray
December 22 2017



A romance as sweet and ephemeral as an Italian summer:  Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer) in Call Me by Your Name




When we first see 17-year-old Elio, hanging around his family’s Italian villa in the summer of 1983, he seems gangly, unformed, callow. It’s a testament to the performance of Timothée Chalomet — named the year’s best actor by the Atlanta Film Critics Circle and other critics’ groups — that by the end of Call Me By Your Name, which spans only half a year, Elio seems to have aged, if not into adulthood, then into the outer circle of that perilous, doomed state.

Trailing laudatory buzz since its Sundance premiere nearly a year ago, director Luca Guadagnino's film is one of the rare ones that lives up to its hype. Based on André Aciman's 2007 novel, it’s a coming-of-age and sexual-awakening tale that really can’t be minimized as “a gay flick.” It’s a great, smart, sensory look at the pleasures of Italy and the bittersweet joys of first love.

Elio is the well-loved only child of an academic American father, Professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg), and a beautiful mother, Annella (Amira Casar), who spend summers and other holidays at their sprawling villa in northern Italy. Every summer, Perlman invites a graduate student to spend six weeks as an assistant for his Greco-Roman studies. It’s not exactly a bad gig. The latest, 24-year-old Oliver (Armie Hammer), quickly adapts to the daily extracurricular routine of sunbathing, savoring wine-y alfresco lunches, swimming in the nearby river and dancing with girls at the village disco.

Director Guadagnino, known here for I Am Love  and A Bigger Splash, should be paid by the Italian tourism board. He’s a rapturist — and I use that word meaning not someone who believes in End Times, but one who celebrates the earthly world we live in. The Perlmans’ is a household where Italian, French, German and English are spoken with equal ease, art and history are treasured, and Elio spends his time playfully transposing Bach compositions to his guitar. It’s egghead heaven, but also a sensual paradise.

That becomes even truer when Elio’s initial resentment — he’s had to surrender his bedroom to Oliver — turns to something trickier. The two men bike together in town, flirt with some of the same girls, then gradually start flirting with each other. In many ways, they could not be less alike. Elio is skinny and pasty, Oliver is rusty blond, honeyed by the sun, athletic and the sort of fellow you see modeling sportswear in catalogs. But both are drawn to one another’s prickly intelligence and shared Jewish heritage. And, eventually, they wind up in bed and fall into a romance as sweet and ephemeral as an Italian summer.

The skill of Guadagnino’s film, based on James Ivory’s script (livelier than any of his Merchant-Ivory films, except for A Room with a View) is the time it takes to tease out Elio and Oliver’s attraction, and to deepen our investment in how it plays out.

As Elio’s dad, who sees more of what’s going on than Elio thinks he does, Stuhlbarg delivers, near the end of the film, the gift of a perfect monologue, largely drawn from the book. It cements the father-son bond at a time when such things, in life, are far from guaranteed. It’s a lovely scene from a reliably strong actor (he also has a small role in Steven Spielberg’s upcoming The Post.)

Hammer is strong in a role that lets go beyond the handsome, bland roles he’s largely been saddled with. But it’s Chalamet’s movie, literally from start to finish. He’s only 21, and was younger when Call Me  was filmed, but he ushers Elio, and the movie, from a state of young, carefree curiosity to the melancholy that comes with experience. And if you see a better closing shot this year than Call Me By Your Name’s, I want to hear about it.




Call Me by Your Name. With Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbard. Directed by Luca Guadagnino. Rated R for sexual content, nudity and some language. In English, Italian, French and German, with subtitles. 132 minutes. At Landmark Midtown Art Cinema and AMC Phipps Plaza.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://dailyfilmfix.com/?p=4926


Call Me by Your Name

by Jonathan W. Hickman
December 22 2017



Through subtlety Hammer manages to reveal doubt in his character:  Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer)
in Call Me by Your Name





Call Me By Your Name, is one of this year’s most romantic films. It might also be one of the most controversial.

Set in 1983, the movie will undoubtedly make some viewers squirm not necessarily due the gay sexual content, but because the story involves a man engaged in an explicit affair with a 17-year-old. Still, there is a point in the film when you wonder whether the younger man is controlling the older one.

Elio (Timothée Chalomet) is a hip 17-year-old living with his highly educated and enlightened parents in rural Italy. It’s a beautiful place to spend the summer where love and lust form a confusing, intoxicating concoction. When his father’s research assistant, Oliver (Armie Hammer), visits, Elio is immediately curious. Of course, he sloughs off his initial feelings armoring himself with sarcasm and diving into an immediately physical relationship with a local girl. But, in time, the dangerous curiosity that plagues Elio turns into a mutual attraction, and he and Oliver become entangled in a torrid, private affair.

Can such an uneasy pairing flourish in that time, in that place, when everything and everyone are only temporary?

Call Me By Your Name  is an adaptation by screenwriter James Ivory of André Aciman's novel. The Oscar-nominated Ivory, whose work includes the similarly themed Maurice  that found a theatrical re-release earlier this year, gets the power play between the man and the young man exactly right. Part of the magic of the film is seeing the moment when Oliver realizes that his younger lover might not be wholly into him. It is an uncertainty that flashes quickly over the more mature man humbling him enough to make him aloof and weakened substantially. Maybe this love or maybe just a momentary fascination.

Credit goes to Hammer. His Oliver is a striking, arrogant, fair-haired hunk capable of wooing and winning over most any target—male or female. But through subtlety Hammer manages to reveal doubt in his character. In one key scene, his irresistible wide, inviting smile tilts and sours as internal questions about his actions overtake him. I got the impression that Oliver wasn’t questioning his sexuality but wondering in that moment whether he would be capable of keeping the exciting Elio all to himself. These are the things older men think about, even when the older man is still under 30.

The sex is explicit here. Hammer and Chalamet don’t hold back. And there is a particular scene involving a piece of fruit that will stay with you after the screening. But the sex isn’t used as a special effect or an exploitative gimmick. Sure it is titilating but never salacious. And there are real emotions on display. Chalamet capitalizes on the theme especially in the film’s closing moments.

Of note is Michael Stuhlbarg, who plays Elio’s father, a sensitive academic. Stuhlbarg is having a great year, also appearing in a critical role in another awards darling The Shape of Watert. But in Call Me By Your Name, he shares one of the best father/child scenes ever on screen. It’s a scene that rivals the interaction between Ellen Page and J. K. Simmons in the Oscar-winning Juno.

Raw and honest, Call Me By Your Name  exposes loss of innocence while celebrating the importance of one’s first love in a mature, albeit graphic, way.



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,650]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzFQ4CgWYY4[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzFQ4CgWYY4/size]

It's up again, this time with a different poster.

SPOILER! This is the actual
last 3:42 of the movie--
IF YOU WANT TO WAIT
UNTIL YOU SEE THE MOVIE
DON'T WATCH THE VIDEO!
Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
Call Me by Your Name
Sufjan Stevens - Visions of Gideon

This is the ending scene of the movie "Call Me By Your Name".
Music "Visions Of Gideon - Sufjan Stevens"

All copyrighted material belongs their respective owners


Huy Doan
Published on Dec 21, 2017


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=1100,610]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6OVjopWjcI[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6OVjopWjcI

I LOVE YOU (Timothée Chalamet great performance)

I love the way Elio looks at Oliver, so I did this video about this little gazes, smiles and touches.
Timothée is doing something incredible with his eyes. So just watch it and feel it.

Movie: Call Me By Your Name  (2017)
Music: WOODKID - I Love You (Quintet Version)
Peaches Art: Cara Brown - Life in Full Color
Edit: alexiabertha

Timothée Chalamet - as Elio
with
Armie Hammer - as Oliver
Call Me by Your Name

All copyrighted material belongs their respective owners


ʙᴇʀᴛʜᴀ
(alexiabertha)

Published on Jan 2, 2018





And here's the original video;
the song is from 2013--




[youtube=1100,610]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-nFIo4f71g[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-nFIo4f71g

'I Love You' (2013)
Quintet Version

Woodkid - Yoann Lemoine
(and Ambroise Willaume)


WoodkidVEVO
Published on Sep 27, 2013


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Elio is a precocious young musician whose sense of humor amounts to playing Bach tunes in the style of other composers and seeing who’ll notice the difference—he’s a nerd. And a joy. As wonderfully fleshed out by Timothée Chalamet, Elio’s got a vibrant restlessness in him, a boldly unsuppressed curiosity that pushes him in the bookish Oliver’s direction. You could say Armie Hammer, meanwhile, who’s 6-foot-5, blond, and royally handsome, is playing to type. He’s a little bit of a bro, but deceptively smart. When Elio’s father, played by the great Michael Stuhlbarg, quizzes Oliver’s philology, he passes with flying colors.

(....)

Strangely, by the end, I had become less interested in Elio and Oliver than in the time and place and, most especially, the parents whose generous wisdom allowed this love to flourish. The joy of this movie for me isn’t in watching Elio and Oliver navigate their emotional whims, it’s in watching Elio’s parents notice and silently face, and support, those whims from the sideline. Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar, who plays Elio’s mother, carry a lot of wisdom in their glances—and even more in their silence.





https://www.theringer.com/movies/2017/11/24/16691712/call-me-by-your-name-film-review-armie-hammer



Call Me by Your Name
Is a Gay Love Story, Minus the Self-Torture
Luca Guadagnino’s sumptuous film captures the ephemeral joy
of a summer romance, but what’s beneath the surface leaves a
more lasting impression


by K. Austin Collins
Nov 24, 2017, 8:45am EST



Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name  Sony Pictures/Ringer illustration



Shall we start with the peach? Somewhere in Northern Italy, on a sun-drenched summer afternoon in 1983, a 17-year-old American Italian boy named Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is reading Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a peach at his side. This has been a season of self-discovery for Elio. His father, an archaeologist who studies ancient sculpture, has once again taken on a graduate student for the summer to help him catalog his findings. This year, that student is a tall 24-year-old American man named Oliver (Armie Hammer), a statuesque discovery in his own right. Oliver and Elio have lately become entangled in a romance—or something like that. Elio, who has a girlfriend, is still figuring himself out. What he knows is that, thanks to Oliver, something in him has been awakened. And what he knows, at this very moment, is that he wants to fuck a peach.

Even then, maybe “knows” is overstating it. Call Me By Your Name, Luca Guadagnino’s sumptuous, boyishly intellectual new romantic film, is the kind of movie to let a discovery like this play out at the natural pace of his characters’ curiosity. Anyone who’s read or even heard about the 2007 André Aciman novel, the modern gay classic on which the movie is based, will see the peach and immediately know what’s coming: Elio absentmindedly digging at the peach’s flesh, carving a hole into it with his fingers before removing the pits, sticking his fingers inside, and getting an idea. They know Oliver will catch him afterward—and they know what happens next. Still, Guadagnino lets this all unfold with characteristically sympathetic patience, even as, for Elio, it drifts briefly into self-loathing. “I’m sick, aren’t I?” says Elio. “I wish everyone was as sick as you,” says Oliver.

Call Me By Your Name  tells the story of two people wrapped up in a painfully brief summer romance that starts, funnily enough, with them a little at odds. You get the sense, by the end, that they wish they’d had more time, that they wish they had discovered each other’s wants a little sooner. It’s almost improbable that they wouldn’t get along. Elio is a precocious young musician whose sense of humor amounts to playing Bach tunes in the style of other composers and seeing who’ll notice the difference—he’s a nerd. And a joy. As wonderfully fleshed out by Chalamet, Elio’s got a vibrant restlessness in him, a boldly unsuppressed curiosity that pushes him in the bookish Oliver’s direction. You could say Hammer, meanwhile, who’s 6-foot-5, blond, and royally handsome, is playing to type. He’s a little bit of a bro, but deceptively smart. When Elio’s father, played by the great Michael Stuhlbarg, quizzes Oliver’s philology, he passes with flying colors.

Still, despite the rich opportunities for, if nothing else, intellectual attraction, their early interactions are a little awkward. Elio and Oliver spend much of the summer playfully antagonizing each other. Oliver, who wears a Star of David around his neck, has a laxness about him, a surfer attitude wearing khaki shorts and slickened hair, that Elio initially hates. Oliver doesn’t say goodbye when he exits a room: He shoots off from the dinner table with a quick, casual, “Later!” “Don’t you think he’s impolite with the way he says, ‘Later’?” Elio asks his parents. “Arrogant?”

Call Me By Your Name  is suffused with a cosmopolitan sense of attraction that makes it feel like a throwback to Thomas Mann's seminal Death in Venice, about a writer who falls for a beautiful youth, and other stories of the kind—minus the tragedy. These are characters who joke about Bach and read Heraclitus’s The Cosmic Fragments. They test each other intellectually before involving themselves physically. There’s a strain of gay fiction in line with this, one that contrasts the brutally singular life of the mind with the inner and outer lives of the flesh, studying the gap between who these characters are as logical, thinking subjects versus feeling, desiring ones. Even the academic work we see in Guadagnino's movie, the cataloguing and recovery of large, handsome, Athenian busts, feels erotically charged, as well as simply romantic in its own right: The bodies are beautiful. Where Aciman’s novel and Guadagnino’s film differ from tradition is in the lack of tragic self-torture. Elio has his internal ups and downs, but they’re boyish, not brutal. Call Me By Your Name’s sun-drenched, olive-hued intellectualism is a soft rebuke to the genre’s tendency toward unfulfillment. If there’s any self-torture here, it’s merely the hormonal confusion of an occasionally jealous teenager.

Much of this is delightful—but much of what’s here points to a richer, stranger set of discoveries than what Guadagnino openly explores in the movie. Sexually, it comes off a little muted. In Aciman’s novel, Elio’s curiosity verges on fetish—the peach being a memorable example. Our sense of the fearlessness of Chalamet’s performance, meanwhile, is in the small, odd moments—Elio sniffing Oliver’s underwear, or watching him pee, or practically licking his face—that come off as the actor fully taking on his character’s mishmash of new curiosities. But instead of exploring the Elio who’s got his face in the seat of Oliver’s boxers, Guadagnino gives room to the sad-faced, lovelorn Elio, who senses the approaching conclusion of summer and doesn’t want this moment to end. Multiple montages set to Sufijan Stevens songs more or less tell you where Guadagnino’s heart is: They reveal the predilections of a director who’s a little more boring than his own material. Guadagnino has fashioned this into an outright love story. It’s possible that what’s really here is something a little more exciting, even dangerous.

Strangely, by the end, I had become less interested in Elio and Oliver than in the time and place and, most especially, the parents whose generous wisdom allowed this love to flourish. The joy of this movie for me isn’t in watching Elio and Oliver navigate their emotional whims, it’s in watching Elio’s parents notice and silently face, and support, those whims from the sideline. Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar, who plays Elio’s mother, carry a lot of wisdom in their glances—and even more in their silence.

Perhaps Elio’s parents interest me more than Elio because they’re the ones whose desires go unexpressed. It’s a reversal of our expectations: The gay characters aren’t the ones whose feelings are reduced to knowing looks and reading between the lines. Elio’s parents’ are. His self-understanding is abundant and open; their understanding of their son, meanwhile, becomes a quiet code that sets a loving, compassionate tone for the entire movie. If, by the end, I find myself curious about the man Elio will grow to become, it’s because of who his parents encourage him to be. Call Me By Your Name  makes you remember how it felt to realize, as you became an adult, that your best experiences are ephemeral—that by the time you recognize an experience for what it is, it’s already a memory. Like his parents, you want Elio to cherish this moment. And thanks to Guadagnino, we, at least, can live that moment as a movie.







Also see:






http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/the_movie_club/features/2018/movie_club_2017/the_rules_of_movie_stardom_are_broken.html




All the old rules about movie stardom are broken.
By Amy Nicholson
JAN. 3 2018 1:59 PM


EXCERPT:


If Hollywood played by its old rules, I, Tonya ’s Margot Robbie and Call Me By Your Name ’s Armie Hammer should be huge stars. They’re funny, smart, self-aware, charismatic, and freakishly attractive. Yet, they feel like underdogs, and I’m trying to figure out why. Robbie has made intelligent choices. Her scene-stealing introduction as Leonardo DiCaprio’s trophy wife in Wolf of Wall Street. Her classic romantic caper with Will Smith in the underseen trifle, Focus. She even survived Suicide Squad  with her dignity intact. In I, Tonya, she can’t outskate being miscast as Tonya Harding, but bless her heart for trying. As for Hammer, Kameron (FYI, writer K. Austin Collins of review above), your review of Call Me By Your Name  (scroll up to see in this post) called him, “royally handsome,” which seems right. He’s as ridiculously perfect as a cartoon prince, and I loved how Luca Guadagnino made a joke of how outlandish the 6-foot-5 blond looks in the Italian countryside. Whether he’s unfurling himself from a tiny Fiat or stopping conversation with his gangly dance movies, he can’t blend in—and good on him and Guadagnino for embracing it.

But even if Robbie and Hammer each claim an Oscar nomination this year, I suspect they’ll stay stalled out in this strange time when great actors are simply supporting players in a superhero franchise. I’m fascinated by Robbie and Hammer because they’re like fossils of some alpha carnivore that should have thrived. Does anyone else feel like the tectonic plates under Hollywood have shifted and we’re now staring at the evidence that everything we know is extinct? It’s not just that the old rules have changed—no new rules have replaced them. No one seems to know what works.





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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"