Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 249624 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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So if fans of BBM are Brokies, would fans of CMBYN be.........Peaches?   :laugh:




Pretty much, Truman! (#gaymerch  #gayart  #laterpeaches 🍑)     ;D ;D










CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
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by Stephen Author \ Illustrator \ designer of wearable goods 🇨🇦 https://www.instagram.com/stephendraw/



13th January 2018 2,679 Likes

#timothée chalamet  #elio  #elio perlman  #armie hammer  #oliver  #ulliva  #actor
#call me by your name  #cmbyn  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #lgbt
#movies  #film #lgbtmovie  #oscar  #laterpeaches 🍑
#art  #my art  #artist #fanart #work #artistsoninstagram #instagay #gayart #gaystagram #gay #love
#instagay #gaypin #gaypins #pinstagram #pingame #instapin #pin #enamelpinstagram
#enamelpingame #instaenamelpin #enamelpin #enamelpins #enamelgaypin
#gaymerch #pincollector #pinoftheday
#later!


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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Parody, I suppose.
                                                                              Heh!!  ;D ;D

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline southendmd

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Sent to me by Meryl.  From Vanity Fair.

“I Couldn’t Write Silence”: Call Me by Your Name Author André Aciman on the Oscar-Nominated Film Adaptation of His Novel

“What I do is chisel a statue down to its finest, most elusive details,” writes the author, whose novel is the basis for Luca Guadagnino’s now best-picture-nominated film. “What a film director does is make the statue move.”

by ANDRÉ ACIMAN
JANUARY 24, 2018 10:58 AM

I arrived on the film set of Call Me by Your Name an hour after landing in Milan. I was tired, jet-lagged, and needed an hour to rest, but my driver took me directly to a square in the town of Pandino where the film crew was assembled and preparing for a shoot. At the center of the piazza was a World War I monument, and tucked away in a corner was a tiny café.

This was not the kind of piazza I had pictured when writing Call Me by Your Name years earlier. The town square I imagined was far smaller and stood high on a hill overlooking a windswept Mediterranean. Here in Italy’s landlocked Lombardy region there was no sea whatsoever, nor even a telltale hint of a breeze in the air and, drenched under an intensely blinding noonday sun, the square felt spookily deserted. Right away, I knew that very little in the film would correspond to my novel and, like any author, was wistfully resigned to watching my story morph under someone else’s vision.

Before me stood the two lead actors, Timothée Chalamet (Elio, in the film) and Armie Hammer (Oliver), and the director Luca Guadagnino. All three greeted me warmly before going back to discussing a scene for which everyone was busily setting up. Meanwhile, I was shown around the piazza. The signs in the shop windows bore prices for food and clothing in liras, not euros; one of the billboards sported a very dated Communist Party poster; a boxy, old, gray Fiat stood away from the square, and against the wall of the small café, I spotted an obsolete red Illy coffee sign. The square, I was told, was retrofitted for 1983. “Who could possibly spot the small cursive prices in liras on the shop windows?” I asked Peter Spears, the producer. Guadagnino, like his idol Luchino Visconti, the great Italian film director of The Leopard and Death in Venice fame, is a stickler for these micro-devilish details.


Moments later, the actors hopped on their bicycles and vanished from the piazza, waiting to be summoned as the camera rolled. Then, the word “action,” and suddenly Elio and Oliver ride into the square. They stop, buy cigarettes, and begin to smoke. They stand before the statue, which Oliver mistakenly assumes is a World War II memorial. No, Elio interjects, it commemorates the battle of the Piave, a devastating battle where the Italians sustained huge losses despite their victory.

I’ve arrived at the most difficult and, perhaps, most important scene in my novel. Three minutes later, in a single tracking shot, the climactic moment of the film is done. This was the “avowal” scene: a moment when Elio finds the nerve to tell Oliver, though very obliquely, that, despite what everyone thinks, he “knows very little about things that matter.” Elio and Oliver wrap around opposite sides of the war memorial. “What things that matter?” Oliver asks. “You know what things.” “Why are you telling me this?” asks an intrigued, though still baffled Oliver. “Because I thought you should know.” “Because you thought I should know?” asks Oliver again, beginning to seize Elio’s meaning. “Because I wanted you to know,” Elio repeats, almost speaking the words to himself.

It had taken me two whole days and five pages to capture the diffident dialogue between the two would-be lovers. But Guadagnino had distilled it in just a few minutes. They shot it three to four more times. For me, the message was clear: film cuts and trims with savage brevity, where a shrug or an intercepted glance or a nervous pause between two words can lay bare the heart in ways written prose is far more nuanced and needs more time and space on the page. But the thing is, I couldn’t write silence. I couldn’t measure pauses and breaths and the most elusive yet expressive body language.

Cinema can be an entirely magical medium. What I do as a writer, and what Guadagnino does as a film director, is more than speak two different languages. What I do is chisel a statue down to its finest, most elusive details. What a film director does is make the statue move.

I recall that when discussing his plans for the film, Guadagnino had told me that he would end the film with a shot of young Elio weeping before the camera. My heart sank. This was not at all what I had envisaged for the ending. The last pages of my novel sought to capture the lovers 20 years later as they reconnect and tell each other that, despite the years, they’ve forgotten nothing. Guadagnino told me that he had asked Sufjan Stevens to compose part of the soundtrack. I could not believe that a popular contemporary songwriter was particularly adapted to my story, especially since I had hoped for Haydn. But I kept quiet, thinking that perhaps the role of an author is never to intrude on someone else’s medium.


When I finally saw the film at the Berlin International Film festival, I was stunned. The ending captured the very spirit of the novel I had written in ways that I could never have imagined or anticipated, and as for the music, it resonated with the love of the two young men, so much so that the final scene with Elio and Sufjan’s song stayed with me long, long after I walked out of the movie theater and, as happens so rarely, into the next morning and the evening after that.


https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2018/01/call-me-by-your-name-author-andre-aciman-on-oscar-nominated-film-adaptation?mc_cid=76ceb89988&mc_eid=93fc88e1bf

Offline southendmd

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This is a very cool thing.  "Interactive" google map thingie, of the very piazza in Pandino with the Piave memorial.

https://www.google.it/maps/@45.4051949,9.5527923,3a,60y,258.68h,92.82t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sdJV1pl3fEk-5bWHJBjP1qg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Be sure to click on "satellite" and mouse your way to the little square just south of the castello.  Double-click on the green hexagonal square in the center.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Thank you Paul--and Meryl!




Cinema can be an entirely magical medium. What I do as a writer, and what Guadagnino does as a film director, is more than speak two different languages. What I do is chisel a statue down to its finest, most elusive details. What a film director does is make the statue move.

I recall that when discussing his plans for the film, Guadagnino had told me that he would end the film with a shot of young Elio weeping before the camera. My heart sank. This was not at all what I had envisaged for the ending. The last pages of my novel sought to capture the lovers 20 years later as they reconnect and tell each other that, despite the years, they’ve forgotten nothing. Guadagnino told me that he had asked Sufjan Stevens to compose part of the soundtrack. I could not believe that a popular contemporary songwriter was particularly adapted to my story, especially since I had hoped for Haydn. But I kept quiet, thinking that perhaps the role of an author is never to intrude on someone else’s medium.

When I finally saw the film at the Berlin International Film festival, I was stunned. The ending captured the very spirit of the novel I had written in ways that I could never have imagined or anticipated, and as for the music, it resonated with the love of the two young men, so much so that the final scene with Elio and Sufjan’s song stayed with me long, long after I walked out of the movie theater and, as happens so rarely, into the next morning and the evening after that.



https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2018/01/call-me-by-your-name-author-andre-aciman-on-oscar-nominated-film-adaptation?mc_cid=76ceb89988&mc_eid=93fc88e1bf






"When I finally saw the film at the Berlin International Film festival, I was stunned."



AT THE PRESS CONFERENCE
AND PHOTO CALL
February 13, 2017



The (partial) cast and crew of Call Me by Your Name

Front Row: Victoire Du Bois (Chiara) Esther Garrel (Marzia) Timothée Chalamet (Elio) André Aciman (Author--and Mounir)
Amira Casar (Annella) Luca Guadagnino (Director)
Center Back Row: Peter Spears (Isaac--and Producer) and, Far Right Back Row: Armie Hammer (Oliver)

Photo: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images






AT THE PREMIERE
February 13, 2017


FYI, distinguished author André Aciman and producer Peter Spears of Call Me by Your Name  play a visiting gay couple from Chicago in the movie (and who insist in speaking atrocious Italian to the Perlmans)--everyone is saying the scene is hilarious!






From left: Armie Hammer (Oliver) Timothée Chalamet (Elio)   (?)   Amira Casar (Annella) André Aciman (Author--and Mounir)
Esther Garrel (Marzia)  Victoire Du Bois (Chiara) Peter Spears (Producer--and Isaac)



9 February to 18 February 2017

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/67th_Berlin_International_Film_Festival

(FYI, American actress Maggie Gyllenhaal was a juror!)









"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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This is a very cool thing.  "Interactive" google map thingie, of the very piazza in Pandino with the Piave memorial.

https://www.google.it/maps/@45.4051949,9.5527923,3a,60y,258.68h,92.82t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sdJV1pl3fEk-5bWHJBjP1qg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Be sure to click on "satellite" and mouse your way to the little square just south of the castello.  Double-click on the green hexagonal square in the center.


Thanks, Paul--VERY cool thing!   :D :D






Please note "Pandino ai suoi caduti" ("Pandino to her fallen") to the right of the large plaque, there is another dated 1940-1946, listing the dead from WWII. So the memorial is for BOTH wars (at least) and therefore Oliver's line in the scene wasn't wrong after all! I'm glad, I was upset I thought it was a mistake--




Me with yet another bugaboo-bugbear: Does (clearly super-intelligent) Oliver REALLY ask (in 1983!) about a war memorial statue--"Is that from WWII?" when the bronze soldier is wearing puttees and a WWI flat soup dish on his head? Mortifying! But Oliver didn't (creepily) feed the dopey line to Elio to allow Elio feel smart, the momentarily dopey SCRIPT made  Oliver feed Elio that stupid line. (Maybe for the 2017 audience this isn't an issue? Aren't WWI & WWII in the Middle Ages anyway? What's the diff!) But the stupid line made me cringe because Oliver IS smart and he wasn't trying to butter up Elio. And again, for me the removal of the book's Rome episode from the script rankles. For a fan of Aciman's book, replacing the Dantean weekend in Rome with a (literal) bus-and backpack holiday to Bergamo and bucolic environs is disappointing. But, in these degenerate, tawdry Trumpian times, compared to what else you'll see in the multiplex--yes. Yes, it is a masterpiece. And when the two boys with backpacks were climbing towards the pretty falls and were shouting their names at each other in glee, I shed tears.    :)




My apologies Luca and Walter! I shouldn't have doubted you!


« Last Edit: February 01, 2018, 07:26:24 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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It was not the gut punch Brokeback was, but what it was was wonderful. So lush, so perfect in its setting and cinematography. The story, the identifying, oh mah gawd peaches!

1983, will there ever be anything like it again? While Jack Twist met his end these two were on the other side of the world, exchanging shirts. Seeing something like this movie is like being given permission to reimagine ones own life, to walk up to that familiar line never crossed and just tell the guy, hey, I know things. Things I would want to share with you. And maybe it was because there were in Italy, maybe because they were educated, there was just enough wiggle room for that guy to take a chance.

1983 will never come again. Not in my life or anyone else's.
The kids coming up they will have there own summer of love. Art like this it opens up something in us that is not natural, to look back and try to inform our own stories by the ones we have read or seen. It is a phenomenon that only recent generations would know of. Being able to look back, and appreciate, and long for.





“The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.”

--L. P. Hartley (the author of The Go-Between  (1953). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Go-Between )



Location and circumstances. Acceptance, permission, privilege, tolerance, luck: Jack Twist had none of those. And Jack's 1983 was certainly different than Elio's--

Your comment, Truman, made me look up this quote:




The movie takes place “somewhere in northern Italy,” but it’s actually set at the peak of Western civilization—which, in case you didn’t know it, was the summer of 1983. In the breezy villa of a beloved American professor of antiquities (Michael Stuhlbarg), multiple languages are spoken by a loving family. Plates of food are passed around along with side dishes of intellectual debate and affectionate teasing. Girls in sundresses pedal to the lake on bicycles. A brilliant pop song, the Psychedelic Furs’ “Love My Way,” throbs out of radios and on the dance floor. And brainy discussions of art history compete for time with more tangible pleasures (not just volleyball).

https://www.timeout.com/us/film/call-me-by-your-name




FYI, there's this:



Timeline in the lives of Jack and Ennis
by - surf501 (Mon Dec 19 2005 20:39:12 )


Here goes after seeing the movie four times (EDIT: Have now seen movie 9 times), and reading the published version of the screenplay, certain year milestones are noted:

1963 - The year they meet, summer. After Brokeback, Ennis marries Alma the same year.

1964 - Ennis and Alma are married, and expecting their first child. The movie at the Drive-in is "Surf Party", from 1964.

1966 - Fourth of July when Ennis beats up the foul mouthed Biker. The announcer in the background clearly says Fourth of July, 1966. Same summer, Jack attempts to pick up Jimbo the Rodeo Clown, then meets Lureen.

1967 - Four years after the summer on Brokeback, Jack and Ennis reunite.

Flashback: 1952 - Ennis' father takes him and his brother to see the murdered body of Earl, the rancher. Ennis says he is 9 years old, which means he must have turned 20 later in the fall of 1963, after the summer on Brokeback, which makes sense since the book says he was "not yet twenty", which seems to imply "not yet twenty, but almost/soon will be".

1969 - The "Where's my Blue Parka?" scene. The screenplay is messed up here about dates. In the space of two pages the year changes from 1971 to 1969 to a scene with a wall calendar that says 1973! I think that 1969 is supposed to be the correct year, but then why would little Bobby need a tutor at age of only 2 or 3? In the movie though we are free to place it in any year we choose in a given late sixties, early 70's range.

1972 - The montage where Jack is letting bobby drive the tractor and Ennis is baling hay out the back of a truck

1973 - Ennis and Alma sit in their apartment on a Saturday night and watch an episode of "Kojack". Alma wants to go to the Church social, but Ennis dosesn't feel like hanging out with "..that fire and brimstone crowd."

1975 - Ennis and Alma divorce. The date is read by the judge. I believe it's in July. The 5th? (Correction: The date of their divorce is November 6th) Jack drives up to see Ennis, hoping this means they will now be able to live together.

1977 - Thanksgiving with Ennis at Alma and Monroe's, and at the Twist Household. You hear the year read by the announcer at the football game on television. The screenplay describes Bobby as being 10, which means he would have had to be two when he needed the tutor.

1978 - Jack and Ennis go to the Mountains again, "Aww go to hell Ennis Del Mar, you want to live your miserable *beep* life, go ahead..." Jack and Lureen meet Randall and LaShawn Malone, at a benefit dinner dance. Ennis meets Cassie.

1979 - Scene with Ennis, Cassie, and Alma Jr. at the bar. The screenplay describes Alma Jr. as 15 yrs,

1981/1983 - Jack and Ennis meet for the last time in 1981 (screenplay) or 1983 (book). In the book, Proulx says they go everywhere but back to Brokeback. In the movie it seems like they always return to Brokeback or we assume so. Cassie confronts Ennis in the Diner.

1982 - In the screenplay, this is the year Jack is killed, and Ennis has the phone coversation with Lureen. Ennis meets Jack's parents.

1984 - Final scenes in movie with Ennis and Alma Jr., the reversed shirts.

"You know it could be like this, just like this, always"
Black Hat White Hat




"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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This is lovely.   :D :D
I just wish the Vice  video kept
showing more storyboards
and Luca and André kept yarning
all the way to the end
of the movie!



[youtube=960,540]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5u2MAUPbFxo[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5u2MAUPbFxo

Luca Guadagnino and André Aciman
Inside The Making of Call Me By Your Name
Storyboard / VICE News / HBO


In another installment of Storyboard, VICE News chats with Call Me By Your Name 's director Luca Guadagnino and author André Aciman, on the novel's inception and the movie's production.


VICE News
Published on Dec 4, 2017






I think those two have become best friends, no??   ;) ;)





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://www.gramunion.com/allarica.tumblr.com
https://allarica.deviantart.com/


by Allarica
                          (Moya Tsaritsa)


"We wasted so many days- so many weeks.
Why didn't you give me a sign?"

"I did! At least I tried."

This movie was SO...
🍑


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by Moya Tsaritsa (allarica)

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Jan 24 2018 157 notes

#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName #laterpeaches  #🍑
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva
#timothée chalamet  #armie hammer  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  
#book   #novel   #film  #movie  #sonyclassics   #lgbt
#art #my art #artwork #artist #allarica #allaricasworks








Night Scene with cigarette--




« Last Edit: February 02, 2018, 01:26:58 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline southendmd

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This is lovely.   :D :D
I just wish the Vice  video kept
showing more storyboards
and Luca and André kept yarning
all the way to the end
of the movie!


I think those two have become best friends, no??   ;) ;)


Yes! And, yes!