Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 293222 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Oh wow. Now I get it. Elio's shirts. Both whlte and black. And both have talking heads--

Oh my.



« Last Edit: February 03, 2018, 11:15:25 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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HA!
Mama Annella approves!



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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 CALL ME BY YOUR NAME FAN SUPPORT GROUP‏
                                       @CMBYNFanSupport


12:40 PM - 28 Jan 2018
129 Retweets 167 Likes


https://twitter.com/CMBYNFanSupport
https://twitter.com/CMBYNFanSupport/status/957714953682804737


The deleted scenes we want to see.  
#CallMeByYourName #CMBYN #TimotheeChalamet #ArmieHammer



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Hmmmm--Deleted Scene Photo Set? We Want More Dep't!


   

http://www.mynewplaidpants.com/2018/01/pics-of-sun-day.html
http://www.mynewplaidpants.com/

SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 2018
Pics of the Sun Day























The next morning we went swimming together. [....] Later, as he performed his own version of the dead-man's float, I wanted to hold him, as swimming instructors do when they hold your body so lightly that they seem to keep you afloat with barely a touch of their fingers. Why did I feel older than he was at that moment? I wanted to protect him from everything this morning, from the rocks, from the jellyfish, now that jellyfish season was upon us--





CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
SOURCE FRAGMENTS





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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 ‏מָאוֹר‏‏
                                       @chalametic


11:02 PM - 25 Jan 2018
3,403 Retweets 6,258 Likes


https://twitter.com/chalametic
https://twitter.com/chalametic/status/956784458631405568


troye sivan holding the bible!

















 moira‏‏
                                       @suchaprettyliar


6:45 PM - 6 Feb 2018
373 Retweets 871 Likes


https://twitter.com/suchaprettyliar
https://twitter.com/suchaprettyliar/status/961068339786268672


troye talking about cmbyn      
at Music Box SD (San Diego's ENERGY 97.3FM Stage)





Click to watch https://twitter.com/suchaprettyliar/status/961068339786268672
and see what Troye says about CMBYN and Timothée Chalamet




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troye_Sivan
Troye Sivan: His Life Story
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHKBXE6XOpA
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Seems that Beppe hadn't read the Aciman book before writing his article, as it's clear that Timmy's friendship with the little old lady named Mafalda who lives in what was his apartment building in Crema had nothing to do with the housekeeper Mafalda in Guadagnino's movie--



https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/09/opinion/crema-italy-call-me.html


BEPPE SEVERGNINI
My Simple Italian Town Is at Risk of an Oscar
by Beppe Severgnini
Feb. 9, 2018



Piazza del Duomo in Crema, Italy. The success of “Call Me by Your Name” will likely bring many visitors to the northern Italian town.
Credit Beppe Severgnini




CREMA, Italy — The mother of a childhood friend of mine, now in her 90s, still lives in our small hometown, Crema, near Milan. A few months ago, she started to tell us about a young, charming American actor named Tim who would pick her up in the mornings to have coffee in the piazza.

My friend was worried and a little embarrassed. “My mother has a vivid imagination,” he told us. She resented that. “I’m not making things up!” she snapped.

She was right. Tim turned out to be Timothée Chalamet, the 22-year-old star of Call Me by Your Name  and an Oscar nominee for best actor. The movie has been nominated in three other categories, too, including best picture.

And it was filmed entirely in Crema, where its director, Luca Guadagnino — originally from Palermo, Sicily — came to live a few years ago. The cast and crew set up camp here and stayed for some time. Mr. Chalamet rented an apartment in the building where my friend’s mother lived, and they all got along so well that her name, Mafalda, now resounds across the movie; Mr. Guadagnino gave it to the character of the hard-working housemaid. To be honest, I don’t think my friend’s mom will watch this coming-of-age gay romance. But she feels vindicated.

Call Me by Your Name, adapted for the screen by James Ivory from a 2007 novel by André Aciman, is set in the summer of 1983. Young Elio — played by the New-York-born Mr. Chalamet — is visiting his upper-class, academic parents (Michael Stuhlbarg and Amira Casar) in the northern Italian countryside. His dad, an archaeologist, invites an American graduate student named Oliver (Armie Hammer) to work with him for a few weeks. Elio is at first unimpressed by their guest. But soon enough he finds Oliver attractive, and things start to happen.

The movie tells a tender love story, and the two main characters are convincing (Elio’s family less so). But the real star is Crema. Mr. Guadagnino discovered a dreamlike quality in my hometown — in the cobbled squares, the narrow alleys, the stunning summer light, the unexpected shade. And in the surrounding countryside: the winding lanes, the spring water, the deep green of the old trees and the luscious gardens of the mansions, rich in charm and poor in maintenance. And the young women swaying on their bicycles, fading into the horizon.

I grew up among all this. I’ve traveled the world and now work in Milan, but I’ve always lived here, where I was born — just 100 yards from the palazzo where Mr. Guadagnino set up home. The house where I grew up and still live is down the road. My wife’s family home is across the street. The piazza where the two main characters have their life-changing one-to-one is right under my office window. I can see the site now, as I’m writing.

Mr. Guadagnino and I have never met. But I congratulate him. He has seen Crema with a newcomer’s fresh eye, and he succeeds in passing it on to his audience. A few years ago, the director Paolo Sorrentino, from Naples, did the same with Rome, and the result, The Great Beauty, went on to win the Oscar for best foreign-language film in 2014. No Roman director could have done it. You need to be surprised to surprise others.

It’s happening again with Call Me By Your Name, and that’s a good thing. It will bring many visitors to lovely Crema, which has never been on the tourist trail.

Founded in the sixth century, the town was destroyed by the Germans in the 12th century and conquered by the Venetians in the 15th century. Crema was a proud part of the Republic of Venice for three and a half centuries. The marble lions of Mark the Evangelist, Venice’s patron saint, still grace the town hall and the Torrazzo, the main gate leading into the Piazza del Duomo.

And now, thanks to this movie, many foreigners will discover that Italy is not one gigantic Tuscany, a soft drug peddled in predictable packages, such as hills in the sunset, olive groves, lemon trees and white wine. Crema has none of that. Our land is flat; we grow wheat and corn, not olives; and our wine comes in bottles from Piedmont or Veneto. In Crema you will not bump into an American on every street corner. In Cortona, you do. Sorry, Frances Mayes — there are too many foreigners under the Tuscan sun.

Crema offers the right mix of mild unpredictability and sensory reassurance. Every spring and summer we have friends stay, and they are all enchanted. You may think I’m being too romantic, or even biased. But I do believe that a town like ours represents the stunning, ordinary charm of Italy better than those world-famous cities. Rome, Venice and Florence are unique and breathtaking, but overwhelming. Crema takes you by the hand and slowly teaches you what Italy is about: its old houses and waterways, the deep green and lighthearted conversation, the ripe fruit (the sexual potential of peaches and apricots is fully explored in Mr. Guadagnino’s movie).

We know the pleasures of pausing and observation in my country. We don’t look at people, we see them. And we seduce our visitors gently.

Italy can be infuriating — its politics, its bureaucracy, the slow pace of change, the occasional “furbo” (trickster) getting in the way. But it is a land rich in the variety of human nature, as the travel writer E.R.P. Vincent depicted it in 1927. Luigi Barzini Jr., some 40 years later, in his book “The Italians,” tried to explain the reasons behind the attraction: “The art of living, this disreputable art developed by the Italians to defeat regimentation, is now becoming an invaluable guide for survival for many people.”

A half-century on, those assessments still ring true. Last summer, when an English friend, enjoying her aperitivo under our huge magnolia tree, asked me to sum up Italy in a sentence, I said, “Italy can have you fuming and purring in the space of 100 meters or the course of 10 minutes.” Call Me By Your Name  may or may not end up as best picture, but it will convince you that I’m right.
[/size]



 Beppe Severgnini is the editor in chief of Corriere della Sera ’s magazine 7, the author of “La Bella Figura: A Field Guide to the Italian Mind” and a contributing opinion writer.







Can't wait to see this film! Thanks for all your lovely images and words. Crema looks like a wonderful place, just south of the Lake District and east of Milan.




Yes, Lee--lovely!
L'Arco del Torrazzo, o semplicemente il Torrazzo,
The Arch of Torrazzo, or simply the Torrazzo,
è una monumentale porta rinascimentale di Crema  
is a monumental Renaissance gateway in Crema
e mette in comunicazione piazza Duomo con via XX settembre.
and connects Piazza Duomo with Via XX Settembre.







Mr. and Mrs. Hammer in Crema, Summer 2016







AND click here for the latest lovely (nighttime!) image:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BVdf1FKhMeT/?hl=en&taken-by=armiehammer
https://www.instagram.com/armiehammer/?hl=en




armiehammer
Crema Cathedral
June 17 2017
9,017 likes
It's been exactly one year to the day that we wrapped Call Me By Your Name and
here I find myself in the Duomo of Crema, Italy eating a kebab and drinking a beer.
Huh. Life's funny like that I guess.






Yup, he liked it.
He really liked it!


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline southendmd

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  • well, I won't
It seems Mafalda is also the Argentinian Charlie Brown:


Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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It seems Mafalda is also the Argentinian Charlie Brown:






Ha!

Very interesting story re Crema and Mafalda: Luca's casting director happened to be driving in the area when she spied this local woman bicycling by (Crema, bicycles, you get the idea) and the casting director laid chase, catching her and asking: "Could you possibly be interested in being in a movie?" And there you have it: Mafalda, the Perlman family housekeeper! (Real name: Vanda Capriolo.)





Mafalda, the Perlmans' cook and housekeeper, in the kitchen.






http://m.imdb.com/title/tt5726616/mediaviewer/rm3976289024

Mafalda, Marzia and Elio in the kitchen.
Vanda Capriolo, Esther Garrel and Timothée Chalamet







« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 08:17:58 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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More video updates,
André and Luca, keep 'em coming
re the sequels!!



[youtube=960,540]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XN7WeM5rcSY[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XN7WeM5rcSY

André Aciman and
The Sequel(s) of CALL ME BY YOUR NAME | TIFF 2018




TIFF Originals
Published on Feb 2, 2018






André Aciman, the writer of Call Me By Your Name, discusses potential sequels.

The latest from director Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash) explores the tentative relationship that blooms between Elio (Timothée Chalamet), a 17-year-old boy on the cusp of adulthood, and his professor father's older research assistant Oliver (Armie Hammer), who joins the family at their vacation villa over the course of an Italian summer. With a script by James Ivory, Guadagnino has fashioned André Aciman's 2007 novel of sexual awakening into a note-perfect tale of forbidden love.

André Aciman is an American essayist and novelist originally from Alexandria, Egypt. He teaches Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center of City University of New York. He is the author of Out of Egypt: A Memoir, False Papers, Alibis, and four novels: Enigma Variations, Call Me by Your Name, Eight White Nights, Harvard Square. He is the co author and editor of Letters of Transit  and of The Proust Project. Aciman is the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as a fellowship from The New York Public Library's Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books, and he has also appeared in several volumes of Best American Essays.





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"