Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 314178 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Call Me by Your Name  is a masterful work because of the specificity of its details. This is not a love story that “just happens to be gay”. The level of trust and strength these characters share brings a richness that is not necessarily known to a universal audience. But the craft on display from all involved is an example, yet again, of how movies can create empathy in an almost spiritual way. This is a major entry in the canon of queer cinema.







https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jan/23/call-me-by-your-name-review-italian-romance




Sundance 2017
Call Me by Your Name
Sundance 2017 Review
Luca Guadagnino's masterful coming-of-age tale of an Italian fling between visiting academic
Armie Hammer and professor’s son Timothée Chalamet is a major addition to the queer canon



by Jordan Hoffman
@jhoffman

Monday 23 January 2017 06.27 EST



‘Touching and triumphant’ ... Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name




Let’s bite right into the sweetest part of the fruit while it’s ripe. There’s a scene near the end of Luca Guadagnino's adaptation of André Aciman's novel Call Me by Your Name  between Michael Stuhlbarg and Timothée Chalamet that is, I feel confident in saying, one of the best exchanges between father and son in the history of cinema. We’ll all be quoting from it for the rest of our lives.

For many it will be a moment of wish fulfilment, and that may go doubly for queer people whose parents tragically reject them for their nature. The scene is touching and triumphant, but it wouldn’t work on an island. It comes after a build-up, an unhurried coming-of-age tale set in 1980s Italy reminiscent of the best of Eric Rohmer, Bernardo Bertolucci and André Téchiné, in which Elio (Chalamet) falls in love with Oliver (Armie Hammer) and needs to decide how he’ll direct the rest of his life.

Oliver is the latest in a string of annual research assistants joining Professor Perlman (Stuhlbarg) at his family’s fabulous summer villa. Elio’s father is an archaeologist/art historian, and his French mother (Amira Casar) recites German poetry, translating it on the fly as the two men in her life cuddle up with her on the couch. For fun Elio transcribes classical piano scores, which he can also transpose to guitar. The Perlman family is one that can slip a reference to Heidegger into conversation and no one will bat an eye.

It’s a world where the broad-shouldered, blond Oliver fits in nicely. He savagely owns Professor Perlman with his mad etymology skills, breaking down the word “apricot” to its Latin, Greek and Arabic roots. His half-unbuttoned shirt reveals a Star of David necklace, which catches 17-year-old Elio by surprise. (Elio later explains that his mother considers the Perlmans “Jews [of] discretion” in the sleepy northern Italian vacation village.) At first Elio is annoyed by Oliver, but quickly becomes infatuated. How Oliver feels about Elio is more of a mystery, but as the days and nights continue (so many meals outside! And dancing to the Psychedelic Furs!) the invitations to “go for a swim” eventually turn intimate.

Of the numerous fascinating, nuanced and realistic facets to their relationship, it’s hard at times to determine who is the driving force. Elio seems the aggressor, and unashamed about his feelings. (Though why is he so determined that his family’s gay friends catch him smooching a vacationing French girl?) Oliver seems so lithe, but are his initial rejections meant to protect Elio, or is he himself panicked about doing “something bad”? Luckily, this is a movie wise enough for its characters to be a little contradictory.

Luca Guadagnino’s last two films, A Bigger Splash  and I Am Love,  were both highly stylised, with dazzling extreme closeups, high-speed editing and brash musical selections. To put it in blunt terms, he reels it in this time. Scenes play out at a pace more befitting a summer in the Italian sun, and while there’s no shortage of well-placed props (a Robert Mapplethorpe print here, a Talking Heads T-shirt there) the natural settings and ancient cities are enough to keep the frame looking marvellous. A lesser film-maker (and co-writers including Walter Fasano and the great 88-year-old James Ivory) would probably cut the scene where bike-riding Elio and Oliver ask for a glass of water from an old woman peeling beans outside an old house. But these are the true-to-life grace notes that make this film so touching.

Call Me by Your Name  is a masterful work because of the specificity of its details. This is not a love story that “just happens to be gay”. The level of trust and strength these characters share brings a richness that is not necessarily known to a universal audience. But the craft on display from all involved is an example, yet again, of how movies can create empathy in an almost spiritual way. This is a major entry in the canon of queer cinema.



« Last Edit: September 01, 2017, 07:16:09 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Luca Guadagnino’s last two films, A Bigger Splash  and I Am Love,  were both highly stylised, with dazzling extreme closeups, high-speed editing and brash musical selections. To put it in blunt terms, he reels it in this time. Scenes play out at a pace more befitting a summer in the Italian sun, and while there’s no shortage of well-placed props (a Robert Mapplethorpe print here, a Talking Heads T-shirt there) the natural settings and ancient cities are enough to keep the frame looking marvellous. A lesser film-maker (and co-writers including Walter Fasano and the great 88-year-old James Ivory) would probably cut the scene where bike-riding Elio and Oliver ask for a glass of water from an old woman peeling beans outside an old house. But these are the true-to-life grace notes that make this film so touching.










« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 09:33:55 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

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  • Brokeback got us good.
Today I just caught the end of an NPR film review that "built on" the foundation of Brokeback Mountain and Moonlight. I wonder if this movie was it.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline southendmd

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Brent Of The Fabulous Wild
the collective musings of an average everyday sane psycho supergod

Book Review: “Call Me By Your Name”
                     by André Aciman



This review of the book is spot on.  Thanks, John!

Later!

Offline southendmd

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OK, Lake Garda makes some sense.  It's sea-like. 





Well!  Is that a kiss or is daring to eat a peach?

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Today I just caught the end of an NPR film review that "built on" the foundation of Brokeback Mountain and Moonlight. I wonder if this movie was it.




Possibly, Lee, but, as amazing as Call Me By Your Name  promises to be, there are two other new gay movies (also  from Sundance 2017!) opening this week that might be more likely to be "built on" the foundation of Brokeback Mountain and Moonlight--

FIRST, one is actually being hailed as the Yorkshire Brokeback  (or Brokeback Moor   ;)  --with SHEEP!!   :laugh: )--
British actor Josh O'Connor and Romanian actor Alec Secăreanu star in God's Own Country  (opens Sept 1 2017 UK) by Yorkshire once actor now director Francis Lee (yet another Lee!)

I have a thread about it in Culture Tent, take a look HERE:






[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1YAhyU6-tA[/youtube]
GOD'S OWN COUNTRY Official Trailer (2017) LGBT
Published on Jun 20, 2017




Johnny Saxby works long hours in brutal isolation on his family’s remote farm in the north of England. He numbs the daily frustration of his lonely existence with nightly binge-drinking at the local pub and casual sex. When a handsome Romanian migrant worker arrives to take up temporary work on the family farm, Johnny suddenly finds himself having to deal with emotions he has never felt before. An intense relationship forms between the two which could change Johnny’s life forever.
















SECONDLY, the film everyone is referencing as the new Moonlight  is director Eliza Hittman's "Dreamy Knockout" Beach Rats  starring "Breakout", "Powerhouse" Harris Dickinson (the BRITISH actor apparently stuns with his authentic Brooklyn accent).


I have a different thread about this film in Culture Tent, take a look HERE (and browse--I will be adding more!):







In a year filled with astonishing breakout big-screen performances, Harris Dickinson stands out, and you will have a hard time getting his work here out of your head. At a recent advanced screening of the film at Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles, soft-spoken and charming Eliza Hittman participated in a Q&A after the film. A piercing collective gasp echoed throughout the room when she revealed that Dickinson is, in fact, English. He is so convincing as a hood rat from Brooklyn that one would assume Hittman had simply plucked him off the street right before cameras rolled. His New York accent is masterful, and the way he carries himself is uncanny. This is also a performance of extraordinary magnetism and emotional weight.




Harris Dickinson gives a breakout performance in Eliza Hittman's Sundance hit Beach Rats    Photograph: NEON






Enjoy!   :)




« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 07:57:35 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Brent Of The Fabulous Wild
the collective musings of an average everyday sane psycho supergod

Book Review: “Call Me By Your Name”
                     by André Aciman





This review of the book is spot on.  Thanks, John!

Later!






Yes!!!





What is astonishing about this book is the highly elegant and precise writing style of Aciman that steers this work away from the run-of-the-mill gay romance novels with gratuitous scenes of pornography [....] Instead, he deftly executes a subtle astuteness in the narrative that one can’t help but be absorbed by the sheer forcefulness of the words. [....]

You can feel the stomach-churning longing Elio has for Oliver, you shiver every time their skin brushes against the other, and you swoon whenever they declare their undiluted ardor in words so deceptively simple. The reason why this is because you know what it is like to have experienced such things with the first person who had a deep influence on your love life. And while it is a relatively slim novel, Aciman delivers a heart-stopping masterpiece in just 256 pages. Indeed, there is nary a weak page that can be found in the book. Haunting, elegiac, and proudly hyperromantic, Call Me By Your Name  will brutally remind you of the beauty and pain of an ephemeral passion that burns as bright as the summer sun.






Woah!   :o :o :o


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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OK, Lake Garda makes some sense.  It's sea-like.




We shall see, however, if Guadagnino keeps the references (and so many references in Aciman!) to Monet's Berm--




https://akidfromguam.wordpress.com/2015/01/01/124/


A Kid From Guam
Just an island boy living in the city


Monet’s Berm
Posted on January 1, 2015 by Ryan Galindo  @rygalindo


“It never occurred to me that I had brought him here not just to show him my little world, but to ask my little world to let him in, so that the place where I came to be alone on summer afternoons would get to know him, judge him, see if he fitted in, take him in, so that I might come back here and remember. Here I would come to escape the known world and seek another of my own invention; I was basically introducing him to my launchpad. All I had to do was list the works I’d read here and he’d know all the places I’d traveled to.”

Elio, Call Me By Your Name  by André Aciman






(Ooops, though, this kind poster seems to have chosen an image taken from Cliffs at Varengeville  near Dieppe
over looking the Atlantic or even the English Channel (!!!)--nope, let's try for something else--)




Bordighera, Claude Monet 1883, oil on canvas 65 x 81 cm,
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Illinois USA. Riviera Italy.

Painting Description:
The Citta Alta of Bordighera emerges from behind the pine trees.
The canvas was painted by Monet from the Torre dei Mostaccini.




That's better! Better than that--in the novel, the town is never mentioned other than the capital letter 'B',
but when you look Bordighera up on Google Maps, right near the water you find a restaurant:
Monet's Café--perfect!

click for the link:



« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 07:58:54 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[




Well!  Is that a kiss or is daring to eat a peach?




Heh! Could be! (But talk about daring--   :o ::) :laugh: )









But of course, coming back to Monet's Berm--




"So this is where Monet came to paint."

"I'll show you at home. We have a book with wonderful reproductions of the area around here."

"Yes, you'll have to show me."





And this happens--




"Better now?" he asked afterward.

I did not answer but lifted my face to his and kissed him again, almost savagely, not because I was filled with passion or even because his kiss still lacked the zeal I was looking for, but because [....]



[
« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 08:38:49 am by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.speakoutmag.com/2017/01/call-me-by-your-name-has-sundance-and.html



"CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" HAS SUNDANCE (AND ME) IN TEARS


AUTHOR: HANNAH LEE, MONDAY, JANUARY 30TH AT 1:00:00 PM


It is a rare day that a novel that you've clutched to your chest an unspeakable amount of times gets a movie deal. However, for once, the stars have aligned. The film gods decided that I have been burned one too many times and let me have this one momentous occasion. One of my most adored novels is now a movie. Nay, it's a budding cultural masterpiece that will go down in cinematic history. Alright, fine, I haven't seen it yet, but I know it's going to be good. I feel it in my bones.

Call Me By Your Name  was written by André Aciman who is a distinguished professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. The novel is a coming of age story set in Italy during the 1980s about a teenager named Elio. During one summer, Elio helplessly and suddenly falls in love with a man named Oliver, a visiting scholar who comes to work with Elio's father. It's tense, fraught, heart-wrenching, but beautiful and passionate. It is a novel that The New York Times  has called "exceptionally beautiful" and Aciman's prose has been likened to Proust.

Not only is this film directed by award-winning, world renowned film director Luca Guadagnino, it stars Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer, as Elio and Oliver respectively. If Hammer's part in the movie didn't at least pique your curiosity, there's no hope for you. Furthemore, the film features original songs performed by Sufjan Stevens. Yes, you read that correctly. Sufjan Stevens. The songs have been described as "'ethereal'" and having a "'wistful elation.'" This film is in good hands. I couldn't have asked for anything better.

Hopefully, this movie is released in theaters soon because I'm losing my mind hearing about it receiving a standing ovation at Sundance and people dancing in the streets on a cinematic high.













Sony Pictures bought the film and it will be released theatrically sometime, fingers crossed, soon. In the mean time if you're starved for content like I am, you can watch Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, and Michael Stuhlbarg (who plays Elio's father) talk about the film here and weep along with me.

UPDATE AT MONDAY, JANUARY 30TH AT 4:41 P.M.: I lied. The first clip came out an hour ago. You can watch it here and, again, weep with me





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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"