Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 258923 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #660 on: September 26, 2018, 10:43:34 pm »
https://www.townandcountrymag.com/style/mens-fashion/a23319448/how-andre-aciman-lost-his-head-over-a-pocket-square/


How  ANDRE ACIMAN
Lost His Head Over a Pocket Square
Sometimes a silk square is much more than a piece of fabric.

By ANDRE ACIMAN
SEPT 24, 2018



GETTY IMAGES BEN GABBE


This time it isn’t a person, it isn’t a rare book, nor is it a house in Italy that I’m in desperate pursuit of. This time it’s just a pocket square, a pochette.

When I first see it, in a shop on Madison Avenue, it flits in and out of sight, an object whose presence I am not fully registering and have no interest in observing. I am focusing on other things: a tie, a sweater, a pair of gloves. But on my way out, there it is again. Within seconds my indifference morphs first into a whim to look at it once more; then it intensifies into a form of curiosity, an urge to keep staring without knowing why; and finally, as I decide to give it a third glance, into an indefinable need, a fixation I can’t explain.

The 19th-century French writer Stendhal, struggling to fathom what it was about a face or a work of art that set him off on a passionate quest to possess it, wrote that beauty held a promesse de bonheur—a promise of happiness. The little pocket square I spotted a mere 10 minutes ago, I now need to touch it, to own it, to make it mine and no one else’s, because it promises to make me like myself a bit more and bring me something I’ve been yearning for all my life, something that might even help me become who I’ve always wanted to be but had almost lost track of and am about to recover now thanks to a flimsy little piece of fabric.

We frequently fall in love with people and with things not for who they are but for who they let us think we are.

For the moment the pochette  and I are just exchanging glances, barely flirting. We haven’t connected yet—just smiles, like strangers on a dance floor. Eventually I muster my courage and ask the salesman to let me see it—by which I mean “with my hands.” He opens up the case ever so softly, slides open the drawer filled with similar squares, gently picks one up, and lets me hold it. But I’m not sure I’m ready to buy it, or don’t want to decide just yet, so I pretend I’m not convinced, and shake my head. He has seen this frown many times. It means I’m buying.

A day or so later I step hastily inside the store again, hoping (a) that the pochette  has disappeared, so I won’t have to think of it again, or (b) that I’ve started caring for it less. But no. It’s still there, folded neatly in the same glass case, waiting. It knows me. It speaks my language, bears my name almost. I want to know its secret, its make, the reason it caught my eye and hasn’t let go.

I’m running late for a meeting but decide to ask another salesman to let me see it. All the silk pochettes  in the case are made by the same house in Milan, Bigi, all knitted, not woven, in dark colors with contrasting borders. This salesman not only lets me hold it, he unfolds it for me. I want it even more now. What is it that haunts me? Is it its unusual pattern, its colors, its feel, its craftsmanship? Or the seemingly casual way it’s been unfolded, as if to make me think I already own it? I eye the price. Again the frown, again the salesman’s gaze that says, “I’ve seen this done before. You’ll be back.”

I have never been given to impulse buying. I experience buyer’s remorse even before purchasing anything. And I have never been the sort of man who would easily strike up a conversation with strangers and then invite them for coffee. I hesitate, I distrust my own instincts, and I invariably opt to do nothing. So, unable to make up my mind about the pocket square, I walk out of the store resolved either to end this sudden romance or at least to put it on hold, to reconsider—always to reconsider. I am a creature of prevarication and ritual.

There are the before rituals and the after rituals. I am well acquainted with both.

Before rituals: This is when I reevaluate whether I want or need the pocket square—the way I reevaluate everything, whether it’s a job offer, a writing assignment, a dinner invitation, or someone’s friendship that promises to open new vistas. Invariably I come up with all manner of reasons to defer and ask questions instead. Am I buying it to impress colleagues, contacts, or someone special? Will a piece of designer cloth or a house at the beach or another trip abroad really make me happy, win me friends, and influence people? Am I buying it for me or, more precisely, for the new me who will finally burst forth into the limelight like an outfitted jack-in-the-box besotted by his new apparel?

The reasons not to buy are so persuasive. Still, I return to the same store a few days later, ask to examine it yet again, have it unfolded once more. But again I leave empty-handed. A week later, same thing. More niggling questions: What is it made of? Is it the customary size for a pocket square or is it smaller? Might I have a look at another of the same make? The new salesperson doesn’t know that this is my fifth visit.

There is a side of me that is tired of my shilly-shallying. But there is another that enjoys it and thinks that if I vacillate so much it might be because I’m not so sure I even like this item. Isn’t there something a touch gaudy, maybe even loutish, in the pochette ’s not-so-muted swank? Could it be that it actually repels me and that I’ve mistaken its faux glam for elegance?

But in the end, it is pointless to resist. I step into the store again one evening and, in a gesture that lasts no more than a minute, buy the pocket square. I’ve done this so many times in the past: the Marinella ties that took at least two weeks to buy; the Borsalino panama I finally purchased on my very last day in Italy, when I no longer needed it to block the sun; the Montegrappa fountain pen I still can’t bring myself to use for fear of dropping it; the Drumohr cashmere vest I spent a fortune on, did wear, and ruined by tossing into the dryer.





Finally the honeymoon begins. At a business lunch my eyes unavoidably drift to my breast pocket. “Pocket square, I love you.”




Once I’m home, the after rituals begin. I won’t even touch the new pocket square, much less wear it. I keep it in its original box on a table in my study—as if it’s on probation and might be taken back to the store if I feel so much as a ripple of doubt. Which is why I also keep the receipt handy. Besides, I don’t want what is new to feel entirely naturalized, mixed in with the residents of my closet. I eventually find a space for it next to, but not with, my other pochettes, promising to take it out of its box when it is ready to join their clan and acquire their drawer habits, possibly even their scent, the way we’ll gladly accept someone into our home night after night but feel a touch squeamish about handing them our keys.

Truth is, I don’t know what I feel yet and need to quarantine my new pochette  in this purgatory of new possessions. Or maybe it’s just that I want to enjoy its newness, and the only way to do so is to avoid thinking I own it. This could just be my most cunning way of extending its appeal—pretending it’s still a stranger and might decide to walk out on me. I’m like someone who refuses to memorize the telephone number of a person he knows he’s falling in love with. By keeping the number intentionally unfamiliar, he nurses the illusion that the relationship is newer than it is and that he is therefore far less vulnerable than he fears.

Meanwhile, in the neglected harem of pocket squares, resentment and rebellion are brewing. It says somewhere that favoring the brand new too overtly, like favoring the youngest born, is a form of arrogance and brings bad luck. A new item alters our relationship with fate and can bode ill if not properly inducted. The Greeks were all too aware of this. They knew that before the new could be elevated, something old needed to be given up as an offering. In my case, I need to propitiate the god of pocket squares. But it cannot be with something I already consider dispensable. You have to love whatever you are giving up; otherwise it is no sacrifice. So I’ll get rid of a well-worn tie.

Finally the honeymoon begins. At a business lunch my eyes unavoidably drift to my breast pocket. “Pocket square, I love you.” I catch my reflection on the street—same thing. It is, dare I say, mutual. But I don’t want to overdo things. A few days later I turn back to the older pocket squares, just to be fair, and decide to wear one, except that on my way out I have a change of heart, turn back, and opt for the new one once again.

Thus begins a wonderful affair. It may last a lifetime, or it may not. I don’t want to know, and I don’t care. Right now we’re on fire.

But I do know. Nothing lasts. One evening I pass by the store, and there it is: my pochette. I left it home today, sitting quietly with its siblings, who have grown to like it. But in the store it now looks slightly demoted, on sale at 40 percent off. This is when I begin to eye the new, more colorful pocket squares, and by extension the new me I know is still standing in the wings somewhere, waiting for the limelight.

The romance is fading, but I’m not quite done with my pochette  yet. I fight rising misgivings. I blame a thread that has come undone, I blame folds that won’t go away, I even feel a twinge of guilt each time I riffle through my pocket squares and overlook the one I thought I’d always love. I blame fickle fashion, I blame friends who have seen me wear it too many times, and finally I blame myself, with that tired but reliable bromide I’ve used in other circumstances: It’s not you, it’s me. Not your fault, my dear, dear Kenzo scarf, or Charvet tie, or Simonnot Godard belt, not your fault, any of you, but mine—mine for being so frail, so vain, mine for mistaking you, the mask, for the face I wish were mine, mine for not remembering, once again, that joy is never in the object, never even in love, but in the hunt and the ever elusive promise of happiness.





2018 Writers Guild Awards:
Author Andre Aciman and his wife, Susan.

Getty Images Gary Gershoff

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #661 on: October 13, 2018, 03:32:38 pm »
I've heard that Beautiful Boy is a sad movie.



Yes.   :-\ :-\ :-\







[youtube=910,470]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_ThijP22t0[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_ThijP22t0

Beautiful Boy - Film Review (London Film Festival 2018)

Luke Hearfield
Published on Oct 13, 2018




Steve Carell and Timothee Chalamet deliver knockout performances as real-life father and son David and Nic Sheff in Beautiful Boy. Felix Van Groenengen directs Carell and Chalet to potentially Oscar-winning performances. Watch as 18 year old Nic struggles with an addiction to crystal meth as well as other narcotics. This a powerful and humble film of addiction, shame and family. One of the best films of the year and reduced me to a weepy mess. You would be foolish to miss this film in cinemas guys. Also star Maura Tierney and Amy Ryan. Check out my review for my full thoughts.





If you half-remember having heard of Luke Hearfield before, almost exactly a year ago, this is why:






FYI, watch this young gay Brit's review of Call Me By Your Name --he saw it one of the screenings at the London Film Festival--he's funny AND he loved the movie, VERY articulate (as many Brits are).





[youtube=710,400]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZWHlLNVeXs[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZWHlLNVeXs

Call Me By Your Name - Film Review (London Film Festival)

Luke Hearfield
Published on Oct 11, 2017




Luca Guadagnino's sun-drenched love story is a spell-binding piece of art. It's gonna be an awards-contender but it's also a genuinely touching film that will resonate with anyone whose ever been in love. Go and see it! Check out my full thoughts here.








and, of course, there was this:






Ok, that's it,  I've decided--
I will NOT be seeing Luca's latest.
(Sorry, Luca!)


 :o :o :o :o



[youtube=1250,700]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_I9rbiJWU8[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_I9rbiJWU8

SUSPiRiA (2018)
Film Review (Venice Film Festival) [No Spoilers]

Luke Hearfield
Published on Sep 2, 2018





Holy Christ! The latest film from Luca Guadignino (Call Me By Your Name) will scar you for life. The loving remake of the 1977 classic by Dario Argento's SUSPiRiA  is set at a prestigious dance school in Berlin where the teachers practice more than dance... they also dabble in witchcraft. Premiering at The Venice Film Festival to both cheers and boos - SUSPiRiA  will likely be the most divisive film of 2018. Move over Darren Aronofsky's mother! - theres a new disturbing film that people will either love or hate.

But Which side am I on? hmmmm? That is the mystery. Guess you'll have to watch my review to find out.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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“At some point, he’s got to make a more commercial choice,” says Unger. “But he’s very smart at choosing good roles, connecting with the audience and projecting a tonality that we haven’t seen before. The comparison for me: He has everything we loved about River Phoenix and Heath Ledger. Those guys in their day were revelations as young actors.”



http://www.vulture.com/2018/10/timothe-chalamet-is-the-perfect-movie-star-for-2018.html



Timothée Chalamet
Is the Perfect Movie Star for 2018
By Chris Lee
October 15, 2018 2:53 P.M.


Timothée Chalamet and his little mustache
Photo:  Juan Naharro Gimenez/WireImage


On its surface, the prestige drama Beautiful Boy  (which arrived in theaters to stronger-than-expected box-office returns this weekend) seems like a boilerplate “two hander.” That’s Hollywood parlance for a star vehicle spotlighting the dramatic machinations of a duo of actors — in this case, Timothée Chalamet and Steve Carell, respectively portraying a methamphetamine-addicted teenager suffering through the wash-rinse-repeat cycle of withdrawal, recovery, and relapse, and his long-suffering journalist father. The film, directed by Belgium’s Felix Van Groeningen, is based on memoirs by real-life father and son David and Nic Sheff.

But according to critical consensus — especially out of the Toronto International Film Festival where Beautiful Boy  had its world premiere last month — the film hinges on Chalamet’s devastating performance, which will most likely place him squarely on the short list of best supporting actor nominees down the Oscars stretch. “Timothée Chalamet might be the male actor of his generation,” Los Angeles Times  critic Kenneth Turan wrote in his review of the film. “With moments reminiscent of James Dean, the ne plus ultra of these roles, Chalamet both echoes the best of what’s come before and makes the part his own, allowing us to feel we’ve never seen a character like this. If you want to witness what honesty, authenticity and a remarkable gift can accomplish, this is the place to go.”

He added: “Chalamet is so good it’s worth seeing Beautiful Boy  for his work alone.”

Last year, the 22-year-old actor appeared in two best picture Academy Awards-nominated movies, turning in a supporting performance as a high-school cool-guy in Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut Lady Bird  and starring as co-lead in the coming-of-age romance Call Me By Your Name, racking up a raft of critics awards and a best actor Oscar nomination for the latter film to become the youngest actor nominated in the category since 1939. In the process, Chalamet turned almost overnight into moviedom’s foremost 20-something heartthrob, with throngs of young women turning up to bum-rush him at Academy screenings of Call Me By Your Name (in which he plays a 17-year-old American vacationing in Italy who falls in love with a graduate student played by Armie Hammer), compelling the film’s distributor Sony Pictures Classics to hire additional security guards to tamp down the Beatlemania-like fervor surrounding Chalamet at those events.

Thanks to Chalamet’s sensitive-dude gravitas — and the fact that he’s blessed with a kind of androgynous man-child beauty and great, swoopy hair — the actor’s career to date can conjure fair comparisons to that of early Leonardo DiCaprio. Pre-dating his breakthrough in James Cameron’s 1997 Titanic, Leo delivered stirring performances in a string of exquisite dramas including What’s Eating Gilbert Grape  (for which he landed his first Oscar nomination) and The Basketball Diaries  (in which he plays a teenage drug addict) and also portrayed a gay character — the poet Arthur Rimbaud — in director Agnieszka Holland’s Total Eclipse.

But to hear it from an assortment of Hollywood hands — producers, agents, studio executives, and awards campaign veterans — canvassed by Vulture, Chalamet occupies a different realm from Leo: he’s an actor who has come to be viewed as emblematic of a cultural shift that calls into question the very essence of modern male masculinity. “In our ever-rapidly changing culture, the notion of what a leading man is evolving,” says David Unger, CEO of the talent management and content production company Artist International Group. “He may not look like a brooding tough-guy, anymore. Today’s leading man is a more sensitive, thoughtful person. Timothée Chalamet exhibits a version of that. He’s symbolic of the emotional young man.”

Born and raised in Manhattan, a graduate of the Upper West Side’s Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts, Chalamet cultivated his dramatic chops on off-Broadway plays, landing a recurring role in the Showtime spy-thriller Homeland  in 2012 (as the vice president’s cocky son) and made his film debut two years later in Jason Reitman’s critically lambasted dramedy Men, Women & Children.  According to people who have worked with the actor on the promotional circuit, he is unfailingly polite, remembering names, maintaining direct eye contact, and making a point to shake hands with fans — especially the borderline hysterical teenage females who have become Chalamet’s primary constituency.

“He’s not some kid who decided to be an actor because he had some shit to get out of him. That’s what makes him different,” says an Oscar strategist acquainted with Chalamet. “And he’s the kind of kid who you rip his picture out of 16 magazine and hang it on your wall — there haven’t been a lot of those on-screen in film lately. They’re mostly on TV.”

Whether Chalamet can hope to claim an Oscar at this nascent stage in his career, however, is an unresolved question. While historically, the Academy has lavished awards on twenty-something actresses — Jennifer Lawrence and Brie Larson being two recent examples — the best actor and supporting actor categories have been the almost exclusive province of middle-aged or older men. Last year, Darkest Hour  star Gary Oldman beat out Chalamet for the statuette and you’d have to go all the way back to 1994 to find another best supporting actor nominee younger than 28 (and that would be none other than DiCaprio, then 19, in Gilbert Grape).

But thanks to a recent initiative by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences to fill its ranks with younger voters and more people of color, that calculus may be changing. “You have a different Academy with all the new people in it. It used to be 50-50 with old farts,” the strategist notes. “It’s now a lot younger, a little more savvy. There’s a different actor’s branch. The Academy membership has changed.”

To be sure, for some of the industry’s old farts, Chalamet can be an acquired taste. “He’s pretty fey,” says one veteran studio hand and Academy voter in his 60s. “He might be the next Anthony Perkins, rather than the next Leo.”

According to a hit-making movie producer who arranged a “general meeting” (a kind of meet-and-greet job interview without any specific job being offered) with Chalamet last year, the actor’s absence of macho swagger, his innate sensitivity, and his apparent emotional availability are his primary selling points.

“The way I define and break down my male actors is very specific,” the producer says. “I determine whether they’re alpha or beta — I need to know which side of the ledger they come up on. Leonardo DiCaprio is alpha. He’s alpha in the way he runs his life, in the performances he gives; he’s alpha in the choices he makes. When Timothée walked out of the room, he was beta for me. Maybe in this era, the male movie star that is a little more compassionate, that has that softness, will be rewarded. We’re seeing a complete course-shift around the alpha males in Hollywood. We’re redefining what it means to be a man.”

“Girls love him now because I don’t think they’re scared of him,” the producer adds. “They’re falling in love with the idea of a good guy. And audiences support that. That’s why Tom Hanks is so great. He’s always the good guy. You’re selling the new male. What does the new male movie star look like in a post #MeToo world, where you can’t get away with all the things the alpha guys used to crush it at?”

Chalamet has also made excellent choices so far in terms of choosing scripts and the filmmakers with whom he has worked — one notable asterisk on that resume being Woody Allen, who directed Chalamet in the Amazon Studios’ romantic-comedy A Rainy Day in New York. In light of continuing allegations of sexual abuse by Allen’s adopted daughter, Amazon has indefinitely shelved the film and Chalamet publicly disavowed the director, donating his salary from Rainy Day  to several charities in January.

Up next, the Oscar nominee is set to portray King Henry V in The King, an epic historical drama directed by David Michôd that wrapped production in England and Hungary in August; and Chalamet will reunite with Gerwig, delivering another supporting performance in her adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott novel Little Women  (scheduled for an awards season bow circa Christmas, 2019).

“At some point, he’s got to make a more commercial choice,” says Unger. “But he’s very smart at choosing good roles, connecting with the audience and projecting a tonality that we haven’t seen before. The comparison for me: He has everything we loved about River Phoenix and Heath Ledger. Those guys in their day were revelations as young actors.”

Our Oscar strategist adds of Chalamet’s representatives at United Talent Agency: “He’s got really good people behind him, good agents. They really are molding him and picking right.”

In addition to having reportedly signed on to reprise his role as Elio in director Luca Guadagnino’s planned sequel to Call Me By Your Name, Chalamet is on deck to appear in what is shaping up to be his most commercial (and least awards-y) movie project to date: Dune, a big budget reboot of the visionary science-fiction novel directed by Blade Runner: 2049  filmmaker Denis Villeneuve. Set on a desert planet in deep space in the distant future, the film — currently in pre-production — will reportedly feature Chalamet portraying the brooding scion of a noble family leading a rebellion to restore their reign.

And if the calculus of Chalamet appearing in a popcorn movie directed by an acclaimed auteur, aiming for four-quadrant appeal, carries more than a whiff of What Would Leo Do? — that’s no coincidence. “It has always been my dream to do a big movie,” he said during an interview with the Philippine Daily Inquirer. “And looking at the careers of Leonardo DiCaprio or Joaquin Phoenix, those guys exclusively work with great directors. So I said to myself, if you do a big movie, make sure it’s with a great director.”



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #663 on: October 15, 2018, 06:00:13 pm »
"A 17-year-old American vacationing in Italy?" Well, no. ...
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #664 on: November 18, 2018, 09:53:06 pm »

As always, Luca is thoughtful, insightful, wonderful.
His comments on CMBYN start at 3:49.




[youtube=1067,600]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLYE7Y3xGJg[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLYE7Y3xGJg


The Success of
Call Me By Your Name
Luca Guadagnino On Filmmaking



BAFTAGuru
Published on Nov 16, 2018





Luca Guadagnino talks about his love of film and the making of Call Me By Your Name.



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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #665 on: November 18, 2018, 10:26:22 pm »

More riches!   :D



[youtube=1067,600]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJ2UgMJbLZc&t=21s[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJ2UgMJbLZc&t=21s


Call Me By Your Name
How Luca Guadagnino Met
Author André Aciman
BAFTAGuru Live



BAFTAGuru
Published on Oct 10, 2018





Luca Guadagnino describes how he met André Aciman, author of Call Me By Your Name.



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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #666 on: November 18, 2018, 11:08:44 pm »

Just--WOW.
(After the generic BAFTA promo, the
masterclass program starts at 2:49.)




[youtube=1067,600]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZNUS1BPouY[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZNUS1BPouY


MASTERCLASS
Luca Guadagnino
BAFTAGuru Live



BAFTAGuru
Streamed live on Sep 16, 2018





Unless you snagged a ticket, this is the only place to see our sold out masterclass with Luca Guadagnino, the brilliant mind behind beloved films like Call Me By Your Name, I Am Love and A Bigger Splash (which he reluctantly calls the "Rich People by the Pool Trilogy). Watch a natural-born storyteller share his creative background in this remarkable masterclass brought to you by EE.




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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #667 on: November 22, 2018, 08:58:48 pm »


Very nice!    ;)



[youtube=1067,600]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTUrmW3BNyU[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTUrmW3BNyU


Luca Guadagnino:
The Filmmaker of the Senses
Impactful Pictures



Mike Handschin
Published on Jan 20, 2018






Impactful Pictures is a docu-series celebrating powerful, important movies; their influences and what made them so "impactful".


Episode 3: Luca Guadagnino: The Filmmaker of the Senses

Luca Guadagnino was born in 1971 in Palermo, Sicily, Italy. He is a director and producer, known for Call Me by Your Name (2017), I Am Love (2009) and A Bigger Splash (2015).

As an avid moviegoer, I was really excited to see a filmmaker that offered something differently, slightly more artistic and personal. Luca's films are absolutely beautiful to watch, just by the way they were shot and edited. The cinematography in his films are always spot on.

If you haven't seen Call Me by Your Name in theaters, you should definitely go check it out. Armie Hammer, Timothee Chalamet and my man, Michael Stuhlbarg give amazing performances. I'm pretty sure we'll see the Luca Guadagnino and his cast at the Oscars this year.

Point is, if you haven't heard of this director, you definitely will. You can bet that we'll see more of his work in the upcoming years!

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/dec/04/andre-aciman-announces-sequel-to-call-me-by-your-name

Call Me By Your Name
BOOKS




André Aciman
announces sequel to
Call Me by Your Name
Author of the novel behind Oscar-winning romance says
he will return to story of Elio and Oliver, after the director
revealed his own plans for a follow-up film


by Alison Flood
Tue 4 Dec 2018 08.30 EST



Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in the 2017 film of Call Me by Your Name.
Photograph: Allstar/Sony Pictures Classics



André Aciman has revealed that he is writing a sequel to his bestselling novel Call Me By Your Name, which was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer.

A coming-of-age story detailing the poignant summer romance between teenager Elio and the slightly older Oliver, a graduate student who visits Elio’s family home in Italy, Aciman’s 2007 novel was adapted into a film last year. While the film ends with the pair still young, the novel gives a glimpse into Elio and Oliver’s future, showing a meeting between the lovers 20 years after their short affair.

Aciman revealed on Tuesday that readers would soon be given further insight into how the characters’ lives develop. “I would actually love a sequel to Call Me By Your Name. In fact I am writing one,” he tweeted.

The film’s director Luca Guadagnino has already been clear about his plans to follow the story with a series of sequels. “The novel has 40 pages at the end that goes through the next 20 years of the lives of Elio and Oliver, so there is some sort of indication through the intention of [the author] that the story can continue,” he told the Hollywood Reporter earlier this year. “In my opinion, Call Me By Your Name  can be the first chapter of the chronicles of the life of these people that we met in this movie, and if the first one is a story of coming of age and becoming a young man, maybe the next chapter will be, what is the position of the young man in the world, what does he want – and what is left a few years later of such an emotional punch that made him who he is?”

James Ivory, who won an Oscar for best adapted screenplay for his adaptation of Call Me By Your Name, was unconvinced, however. He told the Film Stage  last week that he wouldn’t want to be involved. “André Aciman just laughed at the idea to me. He said it was not a good idea. They can’t do a sequel, I think, without him being on board. It’s his characters and his story. But that seems to have died down a bit. I haven’t heard much about it lately.”

Aciman’s rethink, greeted with rapture by thousands of fans, is likely to change that.








8) 8) 8)




[youtube=1150,600]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7y9Vydf09U[/youtube]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7y9Vydf09U


Armie Hammer:
Call Me By Your Name  (The Sequel!)
“Will Happen” - Variety



Crema Heart
Published on Sep 8, 2018




and also:


Variety Studio
Published on Sep 8, 2018







https://variety.com/2018/film/news/armie-hammer-call-me-by-your-name-sequel-will-happen-1202933533/

Armie Hammer: Call Me by Your Name  Sequel "Will Happen’’

By MARC MALKIN
SEPTEMBER 8, 2018 1:02PM PT




The sequel to Call My By Your Name  is coming along quite nicely.

Armie Hammer says, “It will happen because there are already people working on it and trying to make it happen.”

The actor, however, is tightlipped about revealing too much. “How much do I know and how much could I tell you are two very different things,” he said at the Variety Studio presented by AT&T at the Toronto International Film Festival while promoting his new real-life drama “Hotel Mumbai.” “I know a lot, but I can’t tell you anything.”

Director Luca Guadagnino has never been shy about his desire to make a sequel with Hammer and Timothée Chalamet. He has said the follow-up would take place in the early 1990s, about five years after the original time, and will touch upon the early years of the AIDS epidemic.

“More than anything I trust the artistic direction to Luca and novelist André Aciman and to those guys who did such a good job handling it the first time around,” Hammer said. “The only thing I want to see is I want to see it happen. I want to do it again.”

“I miss the whole crew,” he added. “It was such a special time. It was such a collaborative, unique, and totally immersive filming experience that I never really had, nor since. If we get to do another one, I’ll feel really lucky.”

Hammer continues to receive peached-theme gifts, including peach-flavored Haribo candy. A fan gave him a 10-pound bag for his birthday after one of his performances on Broadway in “Straight White Men.”

We had to ask if anyone from the peach industry has approached him about becoming a spokesman. “I’m pretty sure the peach industry saw what we did to the peaches and was like, ‘We can’t go there,’” Hammer said before adding with a laugh, “Peaches — they’ve got a variety of uses.”


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)
« Reply #669 on: December 24, 2018, 11:01:48 pm »


 :D :D :D :D :D

 André Aciman
                                       @aaciman


4:07 PM - 3 Dec 2018
12,271 Retweets 53,722 Likes


https://twitter.com/aaciman
https://twitter.com/aaciman/status/1069745030473109504

I would actually love a sequel to Call Me by Your Name.
In fact I am writing one.




 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

 Armie Hammer‏
                                      @armiehammer


4:19 AM - 4 Dec 2018
1,283 Retweets  9,596 Likes


https://twitter.com/armiehammer
https://twitter.com/armiehammer/status/1069929240622231552


Replying to @aaciman

BOOOM!
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"