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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  Our BetterMost Community  |  The Holiday Forum (Moderator: Meryl)  |  Topic: What irks me about the holidays 0 Residents and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: What irks me about the holidays  (Read 48721 times)
Sheriff Roland
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« on: November 14, 2007, 10:56:22 am »

Raise catholic, I celebrate Christmas and that meant the 25th of December.

We had so many uncles, aunts and cousins in town that we'd start having turkey/ham dinners a couple a weeks before Christmas. And that's when we decorated.

There was not an overdose of Christmas in the stores or on TV or on the radio, so that Christmas was celebrated throughout the 12 days of Christmas, including the father's blessing on New Year's day (still a big day in French Canada - lots of great french songs celebrate the New Year) and of course Epiphany (on the 6th).

We kept on having dinner at relatives' places beyond the 6th, but that's pretty much when the decorations came down.

Nowadays (& this is what irks me), it seems that Christmas is all about what happens before the 25th. On Christmas day, seems everyone's recovering from the night before and the spirit's just not there anymore - No more Christmas music on the radio, the TV's all about boxing day (read, after-christmas) sales.

I wish Christmas could be enjoyed during the 12 days of Christmas, instead of the 2 months (or 6 weeks) before the day.

ok, I'm getting off my soapbox now
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Jeff Wrangler
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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2007, 04:53:53 pm »

Nowadays (& this is what irks me), it seems that Christmas is all about what happens before the 25th. On Christmas day, seems everyone's recovering from the night before and the spirit's just not there anymore - No more Christmas music on the radio, the TV's all about boxing day (read, after-christmas) sales.

I agree, Sheriff. In my case, I come from a small family. With my mother and my grandparents gone now, Christmas Day seems very much an anticlimax. Dad and I usually have dinner with his cousins, and it's nice, but it still somehow seems anticlimactic.

On the other hand, the climax remains church on Christmas Eve, with the church illuminated by candles, and all the old familiar carols and Bible readings. And that's still very nice. Smiley
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jstephens9
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« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2007, 11:02:57 pm »

For me I feel that there are way too many family obligations. Sometimes I feel that people feel they have to be happy and somehow a lot of it ends up seeming fake. It seems that somewhere in me I still have this idea that it should be this wonderful, special, magical time of the year and it just never seems to really turn out that way. I think Jeff puts it very good when he mentions the idea of an anticlimax. I feel the same. My sister has always ruled the holidays. When I was growing up my parents went to her place in Texas. Sometimes I would go, but I usually had school, work, or I just didn't want to go. Now that she lives here she still takes control and sometimes I dread all of the plans. I mean it is always nice and I know she puts a lot of work into things. I don't know, but it just seems like I am in many ways on the outside looking in. She is older than I am so the holidays have been so centered around her and her kids and family. I don't have the kids and the family so I just feel like part of the decorations. It just seems that the holidays are her time of the year. I used to have these ideas in my head of being with someone special through the holidays and always felt that one day I would.That has never really happened. When I was in a relationship during the holidays it ended up turning into a nightmare. Oh well. This Thanksgiving I was invited to California to spend it with a group of great friends. The temptation to do that is incredibly great; however, I know that I would feel guilty about my family obligations. Although, there is something about that idea that is so appealing.
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Marge_Innavera
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2007, 01:29:09 pm »

What irks me about the holidays:

1) People endlessly complaining about how much they "have" to do, buy, cook, mail. It isn't mandatory, people. You can simplify the holidays and make them enjoyable without giving everyone tube socks for gifts and eating macaroni and cheese for Christmas dinner.  Sure, you get pressure to overdo from your family and from the rest of society, but what else is new?  Overdoing it during the holiday season is a choice.

2) Anyone who brags about not observing the holidays. You're welcome to sit it out if you want, but frankly, I don't care. (That doesn't apply to this thread -- obviously, we were all invited to weigh in.)

3) This is more than a peeve.

For approximately 6 weeks out of the year, we're treated to endless sermonizing about how 'commercialized' Christmas has become, as it this is some kind of rigidly-enforced law that no one has any choice but to obey. (See #1 for details on that.)

But how much of the rest of the year are the sermonizers the least bit concerned about the commercialization of just about everything you can name, and the materialism that has thoroughly polluted Western culture? They're nowhere!  And this is particularly true of our esteemed clergy. Anyone want to take a guess on how many sermons, lessons, homilies are given every year on abortion, "the homosexuals", patriotism, prayer in schools and sports events, which political party should be frequented by "God's people" and the moral imperative to contribute to the Building Fund  --  and how many are preached about materialism, the worship of money and status and celebrity?  Precious few in comparison.  Concern about the central moral problem in Western culture gets put back on the shelf with the lights and ornaments and gift wrap on December 26th.

Christmas music in stores and Christmas decorations up in November don't bother me.  That isn't worth fretting about.
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2007, 02:34:20 pm »

But how much of the rest of the year are the sermonizers the least bit concerned about the commercialization of just about everything you can name, and the materialism that has thoroughly polluted Western culture?

Very well put, Marge. All your points, especially No. 3. And although clergy may be particularly guilty of this double standard, it's widespread. You rarely hear anyone question materialism except, occasionally, those on the far left (or, I guess, on the very, very, very far right -- people who are so religious they attempt to live like 19th-century families, for example).



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jstephens9
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2007, 03:55:17 pm »

Great post Marge!!! You sure do speak the truth and you made me think. And yeah as far as the commercialization goes we can also take a look at the other holidays, they are too, but like you say it is not mandatory to participate or complain about any of them.
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BelAir
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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2007, 11:25:16 pm »

I don't like New Year's.

Okay.  Well to explain maybe a little bit - I don't like New Year's Eve.  I think it's fine to have a designated 'time of reflection' - things I accomplished this year, 10 dumbest celebrity mistakes of the year, etc...  But, I don't like the go out and party and toot a horn that it's a new year.

I am not quite sure why I don't like it.  Maybe because I feel weird that I don't want to "celebrate."

(Confession - I did enjoy all the fireworks round the world during Y2K New Year's...)
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serious crayons
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2007, 11:35:49 pm »

But, I don't like the go out and party and toot a horn that it's a new year.

I'm with you, BelAir. Years ago, I realized the enforced champagne-soaked merriness of a big partying New Year's EVE could only lead to disappointment, a hollow feeling, and a bad hangover. Yet I didn't want to ignore the holiday. So I started thinking about what would really make a NYE feel special and significant.

I realized I wanted to spend it quietly, in a special evening with close friends and/or family, preferably doing things I wouldn't do on most other nights of the year. So that's the kind of occasion I've sought ever since.

Several years in a row, I've gotten together with my brother, his girlfriend, their kids, and a few other close friends for a lobster dinner. That's been really fun. But it wouldn't have to be lobster. The point is, some kind of special food, lots of candles, music, people you love, and anything else that seems worthwhile.
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Ellemeno
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2007, 12:34:01 am »

I feel similarly about New Year's Eve.  I have this belief that the way I ring in the New Year sets the tenor for the rest of the year. 

This year, I will spending my last night ever in my mom's current house before  she moves across the country a few days later. 

I spent years mad at her and moved from the East Coast to the West Coast partly to get away from her.  Now most of that has faded and healed for me,  And I'm excited that she is moving to the West Coast partly to be closer to me.  You never know.  Sure am  glad we have gotten to this point before the fateful postcard of mortality arrives.
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Jeff Wrangler
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2007, 10:45:38 am »

I spent years mad at her and moved from the East Coast to the West Coast partly to get away from her.  Now most of that has faded and healed for me,  And I'm excited that she is moving to the West Coast partly to be closer to me.  You never know.  Sure am  glad we have gotten to this point before the fateful postcard of mortality arrives.

Reading that made me feel happy this morning, Clarissa.  Smiley

I don't like New Year's either. Wasn't so bad when I was pushin' 25, but now that I'm pushin' 50. ...  Tongue
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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  Our BetterMost Community  |  The Holiday Forum (Moderator: Meryl)  |  Topic: What irks me about the holidays « previous next »
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