Author Topic: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!  (Read 48137 times)

Offline BelAir

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2008, 11:56:58 pm »
He hated all the posters of AKT, with the he will rock you tag line. I suspect he would not have been overkeen on the enormous posters of him again.

I agree he wouldn't have been keen on it, but I think he would [hopefully] have been less surprised/knew more what he was in for when he knowingly signed on for this blockbuster.  He was pretty young and naive [in Hollywood-speak/terms] when he did AKT... at least that's the impression I get from interviews, etc...
"— a thirst for life, for love, and for truth..."

Offline optom3

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2008, 12:07:54 am »
I agree he wouldn't have been keen on it, but I think he would [hopefully] have been less surprised/knew more what he was in for when he knowingly signed on for this blockbuster.  He was pretty young and naive [in Hollywood-speak/terms] when he did AKT... at least that's the impression I get from interviews, etc...

I suspect you are right.He may not have liked the poster, but unlke AKT he would have been better prepared for it.Oh dear I wish it did not still hurt so much.

Offline j.U.d.E.

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2008, 05:08:12 am »
On IMDb today/yesterday:

Ledger's Dad Gives Batman Movie The Thumbs Up - 15 July 2008

Heath Ledger's dad Kim gave his son's performance in The Dark Knight the thumbs up as he left the world premiere of the movie on Monday. Ledger's family flew to New York to attend the screening of the tragic actor's final completed film. And as the late actor's father left the premiere he was asked how it felt to attend, to which he responded with a thumbs up. He added that it was "very good", reports People.com. Ledger died from an accidental drug overdose in January.

Ledger's Co-stars Pay Tribute At Dark Knight Premiere - 15 July 2008

Christian Bale and Michael Caine paid tribute to their late co-star Heath Ledger at The Dark Knight world premiere in New York on Monday. Stars including Ethan Hawke, Gary Oldman, Maggie Gyllenhaal and her brother Jake - who appeared with Ledger in 2005 movie Brokeback Mountain - walked the red carpet to see the tragic actor's turn in the film. And his co-stars were keen to honour his performance as The Joker. Bale, who plays the caped crusader in the sequel, says, "Working with Heath was fantastic. He steals the movie and I'm quite happy to say that. "He's a hell of a talent and created a joker that's very iconic and one that will become a classic portrayal of the ages." And Michael Caine, who plays the hero's butler, was full of praise for the "intensity and ferocity of the performance" given by Ledger. He adds, "When we were sitting down between takes, he was completely ordinary. He wasn't preparing himself or saying 'Please leave me alone, I've gotta do this.' Instead he was talking to me. "We would sit and chat and have a cup of coffee, then suddenly they'd say, 'We're ready, Heath,' and he'd go straight into The Joker. His energy was astonishing, especially when it came from this kind of calm. He's certainly the best villain I've ever seen." Ledger was found dead from an accidental overdose of prescription drugs at his New York apartment on 22 January. He was 28 years old. The Dark Knight hits movie theatres in the U.S. on 18 July

Ledger's Parents + Sister Attend Movie Premiere - 14 July 2008

Heath Ledger's parents and sister Kate were among the celebrities keen to see the tragic actor's final completed film when Batman Begins sequel The Dark Knight hit New York on Monday. The family flew in from Ledger's native Perth, Australia to attend the screening at the AMC Loews Lincoln Square IMAX. The Ledgers did not walk the red carpet. A movie source reveals the family has already seen the movie, which has been dedicated to Heath Ledger. Ledger died from an accidental drug overdose in January.
MLK - - - - - - - - - - - - HAL - - - - - - - - - - - - BHO
*15 jan 1929 - †04 apr 1968 | *04 apr 1979 - † 22 jan 2008 | *04 aug 1961 -

Offline BelAir

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2008, 11:07:05 am »
That middle reference seems to say Jake was definitely there, all the sources I could find yesterday were still a little up in the air whether he would be there or not. 

Hmnn.
"— a thirst for life, for love, and for truth..."

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #24 on: July 15, 2008, 11:44:43 am »

I am excerpting this review by David Denby in case some readers may think spoilers may include the full piece. The link is provided here:
http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/cinema/2008/07/21/080721crci_cinema_denby

Some may also think parts which follow may be disturbing, but I think it important to post, and I may post it in other threads as well.

From The New Yorker:

The Current Cinema

Past Shock


Heath Ledger and Christian Bale in Christopher Nolan’s new Batman movie.

by David Denby
July 21, 2008

(....)

Yet “The Dark Knight” is hardly routine—it has a kicky sadism in scene after scene, which keeps you on edge and sends you out onto the street with post-movie stress disorder. And it has one startling and artful element: the sinister and frightening performance of the late Heath Ledger as the psychopathic murderer the Joker. That part of the movie is upsetting to watch, and, in retrospect, both painful and stirring to think about.

The Dark Knight,” which was directed by Christopher Nolan (who also made “Batman Begins”) and written by Nolan and his brother Jonathan, is devoted to perversity. Bruce Wayne, attempting to bring order to Gotham City, has instead provoked the thugs. The mob is running rampant, and they’ve infiltrated the police department. The Joker, who doesn’t care for money and wants only the power to sow chaos, intimidates everyone, including the gangsters. Wayne and the noble Lieutenant Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) decide to get behind the new D.A., Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart), and set him up as Gotham’s crime-fighting hero. Batman even thinks of retiring. But the Joker won’t let him; he needs him, as someone to play with. An anarchist by philosophy, the Joker uses terrorist methods (bombs, bombs, bombs), and he has an enormous advantage over the principled Batman—he’s ruthless. So the Joker taunts and giggles, and Batman can only extend his wings.

It’s a workable dramatic conflict, but only half the team can act it. Christian Bale has been effective in some films, but he’s a placid Bruce Wayne, a swank gent in Armani suits, with every hair in place. He’s more urgent as Batman, but he delivers all his lines in a hoarse voice, with an unvarying inflection. It’s a dogged but uninteresting performance, upstaged by the great Ledger, who shambles and slides into a room, bending his knees and twisting his neck and suddenly surging into someone’s face like a deep-sea creature coming up for air. Ledger has a fright wig of ragged hair; thick, running gobs of white makeup; scarlet lips; and dark-shadowed eyes. He’s part freaky clown, part Alice Cooper the morning after, and all actor. He’s mesmerizing in every scene. His voice is not sludgy and slow, as it was in “Brokeback Mountain.” It’s a little higher and faster, but with odd, devastating pauses and saturnine shades of mockery. At times, I was reminded of Marlon Brando at his most feline and insinuating. When Ledger wields a knife, he is thoroughly terrifying (do not, despite the PG-13 rating, bring the children), and, as you’re watching him, you can’t help wondering—in a response that admittedly lies outside film criticism—how badly he messed himself up in order to play the role this way. His performance is a heroic, unsettling final act: this young actor looked into the abyss.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


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and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Penthesilea

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2008, 05:56:54 am »
I wasn't sure on which thread to post these pics. Well, I guess it's all right on either one.

From the Daily Mirror, UK, about TDK premiere:


Caption:
From left to right, here are the stars of the hugely-anticipated new Batman movie The Dark Knight -R) Gary Oldman, Michael Caine, Christian Bale, and Maggie Gyllenhaal. Of course, Heath Ledger, who plays The Joker, is sadly missed.





Makes me sad all over again, to see these pics and Heath not in them :(


Source for the pix: http://www.mirror.co.uk/showbiz/latest/2008/07/15/in-pictures-heath-ledger-s-family-join-stars-at-dark-knight-premiere-89520-20644911/

Offline Mandy21

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2008, 07:57:59 am »
From The Belfast Telegraph:

The Dark Knight: the legacy of Heath Ledger

Thursday, 17 July 2008

 

Heath Ledger as The Joker in the new Batman movie Dark Knight


The Australian actor's death deprived Hollywood of one of its brightest young stars. But his performance as The Joker in the new Batman film suggests he was saving his best for last. David Usborne reports on an unlikely candidate for success at the Oscars


There is no point telling fans of the late Heath Ledger to relax. Six months after the actor's death in New York from a prescription drugs overdose, they are just days away from finally watching him as the villainous Joker in the latest Batman movie. And they know it will be wrenching. Their best hope must be this: that Ledger will be so seducing in his devilry they will quickly forget it is him and that he is gone.



The early word on Ledger – indeed on the film itself as delivered by British director Christopher Nolan – is good. Actually, beyond good might be more accurate. This, just the latest celluloid instalment in the Batman superhero franchise, is a "thunderbolt", says Rolling Stone critic Peter Travers, that will "rip into the blanket of bland we call summer movies". And Ledger, who was just 28 when he died in a SoHo apartment in late January, barely at the threshold of his career, is "mad-crazy-blazing brilliant".


That is a relief, although there was barely a soul in Hollywood who had been expecting anything less. Word was out even before he died, of the intensity of his performance as the mayhem-peddling Joker, nemesis of the caped crusader.


On this, his penultimate film, Ledger may have turned in the best work of his life, better even, perhaps, than his portrayal of a brooding, gay cowboy in the 2005 epic, Brokeback Mountain. If the final build-up to the film's release – this Friday in the US and on 25 July in Britain – seems at times to be all about Ledger, few people will complain. The studio, Warner Brothers, is playing right into it. Does it have a choice? For a few moments back in January, it seemed that the death of one of the film's biggest stars might cripple it. Instead, the tragedy is giving it extra octane as it looms as possibly the biggest box-office hit of the summer.


Thus, the red carpet at Monday night's world premiere in Manhattan was black. The film, The Dark Knight is, well, dark. But the charcoal pile was for Ledger. So as premieres go, it was surely different. The stars were not Armani-giggly and when they spoke to reporters it was about Ledger before themselves. It helps that everyone seems to be in agreement about what Ledger achieves in this film – his co-stars, the critics and his family. As he left the cinema on Monday night, the actor's father, Kim, who had flown in from Australia, flashed a thumbs-up at reporters.


Maybe the reaction of his family to his last complete acting effort would have meant more to Ledger than anything else that will be said of him in the coming days and weeks. "The Dark Knight is everything we hoped it would be and more," they said in a statement after the New York screening. "Heath loved the experience of creating this character and working on the film. We are so proud of our boy."


Less certain is what he would have made of the absence from the screening of his one-time partner, Michelle Williams, and mother of his daughter, Matilda. The pair met on the set of Brokeback Mountain and became darlings of the Hollywood gossip crowd after they moved in together on a leafy corner not of Beverly Hills or Malibu, but Brooklyn, to raise their little girl. But they had broken up just a few months before Ledger died – alone, naked on the floor in a rented apartment over a shop. The will he left behind seemingly was drawn up before Matilda's birth; all of his estate was left to his Australian kin.


But any probate battles are for another time. The focus now is Ledger, the abyss of the soul that he takes us into as the Joker and a certain golden statuette. Call it hype spinning out of control if you like but suddenly the buzz on the Hollywood circuit is about Ledger and the Oscar he will win. He was nominated for best actor for Brokeback Mountain but, in the end, in spite of a devastating performance opposite Jake Gyllenhaal as the other sexually-conflicted cowboy, was passed over on the big night.


That Ledger will be nominated again for The Dark Knight in the supporting actor category – oh yes, don't forget the film's main star, as Batman, Christian Bale – seems to be beyond question already. Winning is another thing, however. Only one actor, Peter Finch, has received an Oscar posthumously, for his performance in the film Network. James Dean received two nominations after his death but never got the gong. Oliver Reed is another to get the nod but not the prize after death for his part in Gladiator.


Ledger is mesmerising in white-face pancake and scarlet-clown lipstick as he reinvents the part of the Joker that once belonged to Jack Nicholson (his version was less scouring but lots more fun). But would the Academy normally take a character role in a summer superhero blockbuster so seriously? "It's bullshit," one industry insider said yesterday, asking to remain anonymous. "He is good but not that good."


Don't argue the point with any of his co-stars from The Dark Knight, however. "I will be surprised if he doesn't get the Oscar," Michael Caine, who plays Batman's butler Alfred Pennyworth, said in New York on Monday. "He's got my vote anyway." Caine added that this Joker as created by Ledger is surely "one that will become a classic portrayal of the ages".


Gary Oldman, who plays Gotham City police lieutenant Jim Gordon, concurred. "I haven't seen a villain like this or a bad guy like this since Dennis Hopper played Frank Booth in Blue Velvet – this outscares Hannibal Lecter."


Batting for Ledger too is Batman himself. Happily, Bale is an actor for whom off-screen publicity, even glory, is more bane than boon. So there is no jealousy if Ledger-mania seems to be hijacking his newest film. Instead, the Welsh-born Bale is on the interview circuit knocking down the canard of trying to tie Ledger's death to the stresses of exploring evil and anarchy. It may have been an all-engrossing experience as an actor, but he remained just that – an actor. He still left the set as Ledger.


"I find it to be a complete lack of understanding of acting," Bale said on NBC's Today Show. "I also found it very rude to try to create some kind of a sound bite for such a tragedy. The man was a complex man, he's a good man. I saw him as having nothing but the best time playing the Joker." He went on: "He was somebody who immersed himself completely in his role – absolutely, as do I. But at the end of the day, he was having a wonderful time making this movie."


Oldman also warns fans off trying to find an explanation for Ledger's death in the film. "People want a dark story. You know, 'He was so obsessed with character', 'He was contaminated by the Joker', 'He couldn't sleep', that sort of thing. But, in between takes, he would sit on the kerbside, smoke a cigarette and have a laugh and talk about his daughter Matilda. I thought he was just a beautiful kid."


So if you loved Heath Ledger, do him a favour when you see him in The Black Knight. Mourn him for the first few minutes but then give in to his work and let him be the Joker. It will be less painful that way.


What the critics say


'With all due respect to the enjoyable camp buffoonery of past Jokers, Ledger makes them look like – well, clowns'


Variety


'The director wants viewers to stick their hands down the rat hole of evil and see if they get bitten'


Time


'Heads up: a thunderbolt is about to rip into the blanket of bland we call summer movies'


Rolling Stone
Dawn is coming,
Open your eyes...

Offline Mandy21

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #27 on: July 16, 2008, 08:01:51 am »
Also from the Belfast Telegraph today:

Heath Ledger's final cut: An exclusive, on-set diary

Thursday, 17 July 2008


 

The cult of the late Heath Ledger is set to grow with his astonishing performance in the new Batman film. Sean Porter was on set with the troubled Hollywood star for his last ever shoot. Here, he reveals what happened during those three manic – and spookily portentous – days


I'm breathless and Heath Ledger is downright furious. He rips off his frilly clown hat and hurls it to the floor. It's a minute past midnight and the cameramen are looking at their watches and mumbling stuff about "the union". The director Terry Gilliam is beside himself too, as he scrambles around the set of The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus to persuade his mutinous crew to agree to one more take; but it's too late – the permit to film ran out at midnight, and pieces of equipment are already being hastily stashed into their silver flight-boxes, ready for the next job.



In a final attempt to salvage the situation, Heath joins Terry in petitioning them: "C'mon guys... Please! Just one more take... Just one more. I mean, c'mon, what difference is another 10 minutes going make?" But it's all in vain as they continue packing.


As it will transpire, the scene that's just been shot – a vile mob giving chase to Heath Ledger through the winding backstreets of London's East End – will be the last he'll ever shoot. I was a member of that mob; and in roughly 72 hours, Ledger's dead body will be found by his personal masseur in his loft apartment in New York City.


Nearly six months after his death, as the PR machine for The Dark Knight swings into gear, the actor will unavoidably be in the spotlight again; there's also a suggestion that he'll be nominated, posthumously, for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar, for his role as the Joker in that film.


The first time I saw a publicity still from the Batman film, it was a disconcerting experience: a live man, looking like a dead man already. Heath Ledger as the Joker, with lax, yellow hair, caved-in face, and smudged, blood-red lipstick, bright and colourful and terrible, like a Japanese water-demon, or something from a Corman horror. This image, loaded with ghostly resonances, speaks solely of death; and this is what I find strange, because in those last three days I worked with Heath, I encountered a man who was so full of life.



This was my first job as an extra, and on the first day, before I'd even had the chance to sit down and quaff a quick coffee, we were given our call and escorted down to the set: a tatty and forgotten pub in the heart of Clerkenwell – The Ring O Bells. Terry Gilliam was dashing about, a hand on his battered, suede cowboy hat, to stop it flying of his head; in his wake, a small retinue of production minions struggling to keep up with him. The willowy and strangely beautiful Lily Cole was making her way across the set, and as if from nowhere, a tall, thin figure appeared and pranced and jigged his way towards us – it was Heath and he was dressed up like some daft and dishevelled Pierrot doll.


"Jesus! Heath, you look crazier than a clown's cock!" I offered. He creased up with laughter.


"And.... CUT," shouted a distant voice; then "Good... Good... We'll go again in five..."


"That's hilarious," said Heath. "Where'd you get it from?"


"A film called Kenny," I told him. "A mockumentary about this guy who's got a Portaloo business in Melbourne".


"Oh, Jeez... I know the one you're talking about, it's got what-his-name in it? Shane Jacobson – that's it! Shit, I really must get to see it..."


And with that, Gilliam beckoned him over to the monitors. It was soon apparent that Heath was utterly immersed in this role and in this whole project. After each scene had been shot, he'd be running off to watch it played back, regardless of whether he had starred in it or not. He was so active on set that if he wasn't wearing such an outlandish costume, it would have been impossible to distinguish him from the any of the production team's top brass.


All the talk on the set of was of his performance as the Joker. The buzz was that once it was released, Heath would to be seen in a whole new light – as a "proper" actor, a "brilliant" actor, possibly. He would be massive – absolutely massive; and after what I'd seen of his work ethic on that first day, absolutely wasted too. '


The following day, I happened to arrive at the unit base at the same time that Heath and his PA pulled up in some outrageous super-car a certain German manufacturer had loaned him while he was staying in London. The roar of the engine drowned out my quick "Hello", so I nodded casually and walked straight past, headed for the catering truck.


I popped back after lunch to have another look at the car. As I inspected it, I noticed Heath sat on the steps of his trailer, a black hoodie pulled tight over his head, skinny black jeans and a pair of sneakers, and sucking on a fag as usual. After a minute or so, he wandered over, his PA lurking behind him carrying his Starbucks bucket and Camel fags. "So what d'you think of the car, mate?" he asked.


"I'm not too sure, cars aren't really my thing, but I know what Freud would say..." I replied.


"It's ridiculous isn't it? Talk about a cock-extension... Ha! It's fun, but not really my style," said Ledger. But he seemed a bit uneasy and broke off the chat, saying something to his PA. They wandered back to his trailer together.


Back on set, Terry and Heath were soon having another of their private conversations. It was hard to tell who was directing who. I shimmied closer, only to overhear some scurrilous gossip about Tom Cruise. Heath eventually broke off and came over to ask if any of us had seen the new film about Joy Division – Anton Corbijn's Control: "Their music's amazing!"


On the final day of filming, Saturday 19 January, there were guns and explosions and violence on set. There were arguments, and a bad vibe descended on the pub. Heath himself no longer looked like a clown. He was dirty, wired and manic: he hadn't stopped for three days – kicking about the set whether or not he was due to shoot a scene. He'd be there when I arrived and after I'd gone. And I was doing a 10-hour shift. When he wasn't on set he was back in his hotel room reading or watching some of the Oscar-nominated movies that, as a member of the Academy, he'd be asked to vote on.


He'd been throwing himself around a lot, doing his own stunts, take after take – attempting to lob himself on to the "Imaginarium", a horse-drawn, travelling sideshow, decorated with a series of Gilliam's own hallucinogenic graphic confections – sometimes succeeding, sometimes failing.


It was common knowledge on set that he had a spinal injury and that he was on some hefty medication for it. Late in the day, with shooting behind schedule, Heath's back was playing up. He lay prostrate on the cobbles between the pub and the Imaginarium doing his Alexander Technique exercises, motionless, his eyes shut tight. As I walked past I nearly tripped over one of his elongated clown shoes.


"You all right, Heath?" I asked.


"Yeah. I will be in few minutes..."


"I thought you'd snuffed it there," I said, trying to raise a laugh. Heath just closed his eyes. Once he had recovered, the filming resumed; Ledger pursued by an angry, drunken mob, all baying for his blood. Incendiary devices were popping everywhere, fired from a blunderbuss by Verne Troyer, the 2'8" actor who played Mini Me in the Austin Powers films. And this is the last scene Heath Ledger ever shot; it reached midnight and the union curfew kicked in.


By the time Heath and Terry calmed down, the set had thinned out dramatically. Heath walked around, thanking and hugging people, then came over to us few extras who were still left and thanked us and began walking off. I walked after him to ask if he was going to stay and have a few drinks.


"Sorry, but I'm on the wagon... have been for about 17 months now," he said, mock-triumphantly


"Oh... nice one!" I replied, somewhat tongue-tied.


"Cheers, mate" he said before turning and sloping off despondently up the narrow lane back towards unit base and his warm trailer. "Bye Heath..."


The following Tuesday, at about 8pm, I received a text-message from my sister, who I'd been keeping in the loop regarding my adventures on Doctor Parnassus. In that dull and toneless medium, and in the truncated vernacular of text-speak, it read: "Wot sort of effect do u have on people? U no that actor u were workin with... they found him dead!"


It took a while to register, then I turned on the radio and, within seconds of finding a news station, her message was legitimised: "Heath Ledger... found dead... being treated as a possible suicide... slumped on the floor of his loft-apartment in New York..." I called a couple of other extras to find out if they knew what was going on. All they knew was what I knew: Heath was dead – the circumstances open to speculation. They all expressed a sense of shock and loss. Some wept.


As I sit here, looking at his picture, I still really don't know what to say about Heath Ledger. All I can add to what's already been said is my imperfect but valid little story: the story of a man whom I met, but whom I never really knew; the story of a man who I worked with for just three days but left one of those indefinable imprints that make you feel you've known someone a lot longer.


My image of Heath is of a man envisioning a life rather than a death; of an actor deeply committed to his art – perhaps to such a degree that it contributed to his undoing. But looking back at my time on set, I also see strange portents of his demise: there was even a moment when one of the extras, a devout Christian, began reading aloud from The Revelation of St John. And after our conversation about Joy Division, whenever I think of Heath, I'm reminded of the band's lead singer, Ian Curtis – another young man with immense energy stubbed out in his prime. Heath would have liked such a comparison, I think.


This wasn't how the movie was supposed to end; I was shocked, I still am; but then, what do I know? I was just an extra.


The writer's name has been changed for the sake of anonymity. 'The Dark Knight' (12A) goes on release in the UK on 25 July.
Dawn is coming,
Open your eyes...

Offline BelAir

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2008, 09:32:51 am »
From The Belfast Telegraph:

The Dark Knight: the legacy of Heath Ledger

Thursday, 17 July 2008

 


Maybe the reaction of his family to his last complete acting effort would have meant more to Ledger than anything else that will be said of him in the coming days and weeks. "The Dark Knight is everything we hoped it would be and more," they said in a statement after the New York screening. "Heath loved the experience of creating this character and working on the film. We are so proud of our boy."


So if you loved Heath Ledger, do him a favour when you see him in The Black Knight. Mourn him for the first few minutes but then give in to his work and let him be the Joker. It will be less painful that way.



Thanks for that article Mandy, I really liked it.  Especially the parts above, and what CB had to say.
"— a thirst for life, for love, and for truth..."

Offline optom3

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Re: The Dark Knight: News, Reviews, your Views. "SPOILERS" welcome!
« Reply #29 on: July 16, 2008, 03:57:52 pm »
I so  loved the comment "we are so proud of our boy" He played such incredibly mature roles, I keep forgetting how young he was. In any case I guess to his parents he will always be their boy.

I just wish that one day I would be able to read comments like that and not end up in tears.

A big thanks for posting all the same.