Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 650926 times)

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1070 on: February 02, 2015, 02:35:38 pm »
I read Jill Lepore's article (Jan. 26) about the Wayback Machine at lunch today. I liked it. I didn't understand most of it, but I did get the point that it isn't true that if something's on the Internet, it's there forever.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1071 on: February 09, 2015, 02:25:18 pm »
I enjoyed Adam Gopnik's article about learning to drive in middle age (Feb. 2).
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1072 on: February 10, 2015, 02:28:49 pm »
I don't usually read the fiction, but for Toni Morrison I made an exception (Feb. 9).
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1073 on: February 10, 2015, 06:55:59 pm »
I'm reading Michael Pollan on hallucinogenics for treatment of anxiety in cancer patients. It's pretty good.
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1074 on: February 10, 2015, 09:44:09 pm »
I'm reading Michael Pollan on hallucinogenics for treatment of anxiety in cancer patients. It's pretty good.

I'm looking forward to that one. The topic sounds intriguing.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1075 on: February 11, 2015, 09:58:31 am »
I just finished Rachel Aviv's article about shootings by the Albuquerque police. Exquisite reporting of an almost unbelievably horrifying situation, as is so often the case with Aviv's pieces.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1076 on: February 11, 2015, 10:24:53 am »
I just finished Rachel Aviv's article about shootings by the Albuquerque police. Exquisite reporting of an almost unbelievably horrifying situation, as is so often the case with Aviv's pieces.

Agreed!

I think I don't want to visit Albuquerque any time soon. :(
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1077 on: February 11, 2015, 03:39:03 pm »
I had a bit of insomnia last night so I read some of the Feb 16th issue that just arrived. "Northern Lights" by Nathan Heller is a book review of "The Almost Nearly Perfect People" by Michael Booth, but you would not know that unless you read all the way to page 2 of the article. It's about the Scandinavians and their utopian societies. I started out wishing I could live in such a society but quickly realized that not all is perfect in paradise. I guess the thing I would most like to see is better women's rights and respect for women. The article/book states that Iceland is the best place in the world to be if you're a woman. Maybe it's the hot tubs, the wonderful coffee and vodka, or the chance to wear seal skin. Just kidding. The article cites over a year of paid paternity/maternity leave and I'm sure that's a big factor.

Hamlet aside, Danes are supposed to be the happiest people on earth. Heller doesn't really get to the root of that happiness, and I'm not sure Booth does either. But I gather it has to do with happiness, and wealth, more evenly spread among the people instead of just residing in the top 1% of earners. Also, there's the absence of stress. I would probably be fine with the government taking 70% of my income if I knew my retirement, health care, and education for myself and my family were covered. And if I was guaranteed a job too. When I was working, 35% of my pay was in insurance and 10% went to retirement, so that's not much different. Tuition for my daughter was $12K per semester and for my son, in a private school, it's even higher. This all adds up to a lot of pressure and stress, and I guess the Scandinavians are spared that. However, there's still a lot of existential angst among them if Bergman films and the rush of modern literature and TV shows are to be believed.
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1078 on: February 11, 2015, 04:44:29 pm »
However, there's still a lot of existential angst among them if Bergman films and the rush of modern literature and TV shows are to be believed.

It's the Lutheranism in their cultural background.  ;)  ;D

I've never seen Babette's Feast, but from what I remember reading about it, that might be pertinent here.  ;D
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1079 on: February 11, 2015, 07:22:02 pm »
there's still a lot of existential angst among them if Bergman films and the rush of modern literature and TV shows are to be believed.

It's the Lutheranism in their cultural background.  ;)  ;D

But then the question becomes, why is Lutheranism particularly popular there? (And is Lutheranism that much more existential-angst-filled than other denominations?)

I think it could be the climate and sun angle.

Susan Sontag once wrote a whole spiel about how, throughout the world, northern cultures tend to be industrious and responsible, while southern cultures tend to be more carefree and pleasure-seeking. That seems to fit the U.S. and Europe, though I'm not sure about other continents. And I can't remember if she said the roles are reversed in the southern hemisphere.

I haven't read Heller's article yet but have been looking forward to it.