Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 651316 times)

Offline southendmd

  • Town Administration
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 15,616
  • well, I won't
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1640 on: May 22, 2017, 02:59:49 pm »
How did the English--or the man himself--pronounce the name of the actor Maurice Evans? I've only ever heard it Maurice, rather than Morris. Even Endora called him Maurice.  ;D

From wiki:

American television audiences of the 1960s will remember Evans as Samantha's father, Maurice, on the sitcom Bewitched. His real-life insistence that his first name was pronounced the same as the name "Morris" was ironically at odds with his Bewitched character's contrasting stance that it be pronounced "Maw-REESE".

Offline Jeff Wrangler

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 27,431
  • "He somebody you cowboy'd with?"
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1641 on: May 22, 2017, 03:13:33 pm »
From wiki:

American television audiences of the 1960s will remember Evans as Samantha's father, Maurice, on the sitcom Bewitched. His real-life insistence that his first name was pronounced the same as the name "Morris" was ironically at odds with his Bewitched character's contrasting stance that it be pronounced "Maw-REESE".

Wouldn't surprise me if someone somewhere thought us Yankees would be confused if somebody pronounced "Maurice" as "Morris."

Evans once made a guest appearance on Daniel Boone (as the French playwright Beaumarchais--never mind!), and in the voice-over announcing his appearance, his name was pronounced "Maw-REESE."
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1642 on: May 22, 2017, 03:17:21 pm »
Well, yes, but the Dutch and the Germans don't spell it "Maurice."

How did the English--or the man himself--pronounce the name of the actor Maurice Evans? I've only ever heard it Maurice, rather than Morris. Even Endora called him Maurice.  ;D




Maurice Herbert Evans was born in Dorset, England and surely pronounced his 'Christian name' (as they used to say) "MORRIS"  (despite the fact that EVANS  is as Welsh as they come) but in AMERICA, well-- ;) :laugh:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Evans_(actor)

Personal life

Although he had taken U.S. citizenship, by the end of the 1960s, Evans returned to Britain. Aside from an infrequent trip to the United States and occasional visits to retired actors in financial need (as a representative of the Actors' Fund, of which he was a longtime trustee), he lived quietly near Brighton. He never married, and was survived by a brother, Hugh, of London.



Anyway, click and scroll down and see/hear all the variations of MAURICE (Gibb, natch)--American Pronunciation is totally Maw-REESE of course:

http://www.pronouncekiwi.com/Maurice%20Gibb



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 27,431
  • "He somebody you cowboy'd with?"
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1643 on: May 22, 2017, 03:18:32 pm »
Do undergamekeepers really say things like "Come without fail" and "We shan't never be parted"?

(At least the second one has a double negative.)

Notwithstanding the lack of impression Maurice made on me, I really have always been a fan of Merchant-Ivory films. You always knew a Merchant-Ivory film would be a classy, high-quality production.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 27,431
  • "He somebody you cowboy'd with?"
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1644 on: May 22, 2017, 03:23:04 pm »
EVANS  is as Welsh as they come.

You ain't kiddin'. Early Philadelphia had a Welsh-born C. of E. parson. His name was Evan Evans!
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline southendmd

  • Town Administration
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 15,616
  • well, I won't
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1645 on: May 22, 2017, 03:34:22 pm »
Evans once made a guest appearance on Daniel Boone (as the French playwright Beaumarchais--never mind!), and in the voice-over announcing his appearance, his name was pronounced "Maw-REESE."

Evans played the Shakespeare-quoting villain the Puzzler in the campy 60s Batman series:


But, I'll always remember him as Dr. Zaius from the Planet of the Apes and one of the awful sequels.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1646 on: May 22, 2017, 03:46:23 pm »
Do undergamekeepers really say things like "Come without fail" and "We shan't never be parted"?


Well, Alec Scudder (Rupert Graves) was a particularly  talented undergameskeeper to be sure, saying winsome, lovely things like

"I wouldn't take a penny from you, I don't want to hurt your little finger, come on, let's give over talkin'"

and

"Stop with me, stay the night with me."




Now, here's another pronunciation for you, this time by Hermione Gingold--at 0:43




[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsNm3rfZyCk[/youtube]
Gay Purr-ee  (1962)



Interestingly, there's this aside:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermione_Gingold


Early years

Gingold was born in Carlton Hill, Maida Vale, London, the elder daughter of a prosperous Vienna-born Jewish stockbroker James Gingold and his wife, Kate (née Walter). Her paternal grandparents were the Ottoman-born British subject, Moritz "Maurice" Gingold, a London stockbroker, and his Austrian-born wife, Hermine, after whom Hermione was named (Gingold mentions in her autobiography that her mother might have got Hermione from the Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale, which she was reading shortly before her birth). On her father's side, she was descended from the celebrated Solomon Sulzer, a famous synagogue cantor and Jewish liturgical composer in Vienna. Her mother was from a "well-to-do Jewish family". James felt that religion was something children needed to decide on for themselves, and Gingold grew up with no particular religious beliefs.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 25,781
  • Brokeback got us good.
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1647 on: May 22, 2017, 03:54:03 pm »
Do undergamekeepers really say things like "Come without fail" and "We shan't never be parted"?


Well, Robert Burns, the poet laureate of Scotland, was a farmer. In fact, he was called the Ploughman Poet.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 27,431
  • "He somebody you cowboy'd with?"
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1648 on: May 22, 2017, 04:08:37 pm »
What is it about British gamekeepers?

Maurice. ...

Lady Chatterley. ...

Just wond'rin'.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,011
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1649 on: May 22, 2017, 04:17:21 pm »
What is it about British gamekeepers?


They're 'earthy'?   :D
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"