Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 651315 times)

Offline southendmd

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1670 on: May 24, 2017, 12:22:54 pm »
Thanks for posting that, John.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1671 on: May 24, 2017, 01:48:15 pm »
I did a look-up of James Wilby to see what all he's been doing. I have no memory of him in Gosford Park, which I saw and liked.

I found this great quote from him: "I'm buggered if I'm going to go and sit on my arse in LA."
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1672 on: May 24, 2017, 01:57:53 pm »
Thanks for posting that, John.



You're welcome, Paul. Here is a much better version of that previously posted  (and severely edited) 'group interview' about 'The Story of Maurice'--nearly 30 minutes overall, very worthwhile watching!



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-UXf4GGAqs[/youtube]

The Story of Maurice

Interview with James Wilby (Maurice), Hugh Grant (Clive),
Rupert Graves (Alec), and screenwriter Kit Hesketh-Harvey.
 
(1/3)


Uploaded on Feb 23, 2008





[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNzj9cbY7iM[/youtube]

The Story of Maurice

Interview with James Wilby (Maurice), Hugh Grant (Clive),
Rupert Graves (Alec), and screenwriter Kit Hesketh-Harvey.
 
(2/3)


Uploaded on Feb 23, 2008





[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=act73BrFHVE[/youtube]

The Story of Maurice

Interview with James Wilby (Maurice), Hugh Grant (Clive),
Rupert Graves (Alec), and screenwriter Kit Hesketh-Harvey.
 
(3/3)


Uploaded on Feb 23, 2008


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1673 on: May 24, 2017, 02:40:31 pm »
Indeed! It's all been very interesting reading. Thank you, John.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1674 on: May 24, 2017, 02:47:10 pm »
Indeed! It's all been very interesting reading. Thank you, John.


You're welcome, Jeff. In the meanwhile--


I did a look-up of James Wilby to see what all he's been doing. I have no memory of him in Gosford Park, which I saw and liked.


In Gosford Park, James Wilby was the caddish Freddie Nesbitt who



was very mean to wife Mabel Nesbitt (Claudie Blakley) and



dangerously stalkerish to Isobel McCordle (Camilla Rutherford)



who was the daughter of Lady Sylvia McCordle (Kristin Scott Thomas)



(and etc., etc., etc.!)


Here's the entire cast in an album:

Oops, sorry, because of the oddness of our site's protocol, you cannot CLICK the following url--instead, on a different page, COPY and PASTE and hit enter:

http://movie-dude.co.uk/[Film]%20Gosford%20Park%20(2001).htm
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1675 on: May 24, 2017, 04:04:15 pm »
In Gosford Park, James Wilby was the caddish Freddie Nesbitt.

Thank you, John.

You know, it's been so long--16 years--since I saw Gosford Park that the only cast members I remembered off the top of my head were Dame Maggie and Clive Owen (first thing I ever saw him in), so I took a look, and it seems that just about everybody who was anybody was in it.

Also interesting to note that Julian Fellowes was one of the writers. That name would have meant nothing to me 16 years ago, but it does now, even though I never watched you-know-what.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1676 on: May 24, 2017, 04:58:15 pm »
Thank you, John.

You know, it's been so long--16 years--since I saw Gosford Park that the only cast members I remembered off the top of my head were Dame Maggie and Clive Owen (first thing I ever saw him in), so I took a look, and it seems that just about everybody who was anybody was in it.

Also interesting to note that Julian Fellowes was one of the writers. That name would have meant nothing to me 16 years ago, but it does now, even though I never watched you-know-what.


You're welcome Jeff!

Julian Fellowes was the actual writer of Gosford Park.  Actor Bob Balaban (who wonderfully played Morris Weissman in the movie he co-produced) wanted to work with Robert Altman, asking if they could do an Agatha Christie who-done-it together. Balaban introduced Fellowes (who had been a somewhat mediocre actor) to Altman. Julian Fellowes wrote the screenplay, but Altman literally MADE Fellowes's career when Fellowes won the Oscar (please note, it was NOT a shared Oscar).

Watch this when you have a chance. It's delightful!



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFrVFsjz6bU[/youtube]

Julian Fellowes Wins Original Screenplay for
Gosford Park  (2002 Oscars)


Published on Jan 3, 2013

Julian Fellowes wins the Oscar for Writing
(Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen)
Gosford Park  at the 74th Academy Awards.
Presented by Gwyneth Paltrow and Ethan Hawke.




FYI:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosford_Park
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1677 on: May 24, 2017, 05:16:58 pm »
Thank  you for the epilogue, John. I think it's wonderful.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1678 on: May 24, 2017, 07:12:07 pm »
Julian Fellowes was the actual writer of Gosford Park.  Actor Bob Balaban (who wonderfully played Morris Weissman in the movie he co-produced) wanted to work with Robert Altman, asking if they could do an Agatha Christie who-done-it together. Balaban introduced Fellowes (who had been a somewhat mediocre actor) to Altman. Julian Fellowes wrote the screenplay, but Altman literally MADE Fellowes's career when Fellowes won the Oscar (please note, it was NOT a shared Oscar).

That's good to know, John. I just went with what I saw at IMDb.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1679 on: May 30, 2017, 09:58:19 am »
I should have spent the weekend catching up on my New Yorkers, but I didn't feel like it, so instead I spent the weekend finishing up one Tony Hillerman Navajo murder mystery and reading an entire Margaret Cole Arapaho murder mystery.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.