Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 2155575 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2870 on: October 05, 2021, 05:06:13 pm »
I have found that synonyms for "increase" aren't always satisfying. I mean, mushroom and explode and warp drive and probably a few others work. Escalate, expand. But compared to decrease -- wither, dwindle, shrink, dissipate, subside, contract, decline -- they seem fewer or maybe just less appealing. 

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2871 on: October 06, 2021, 01:05:22 pm »
How about "supercharged"?
"chewing gum and duct tape"

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2872 on: October 06, 2021, 01:46:06 pm »
How about "supercharged"?

Good one! Not universally applicable, but then few words are.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2873 on: October 06, 2021, 09:27:12 pm »
I kind of like exploded.

"Her coronavirus posts exploded across social media."
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2874 on: October 07, 2021, 03:44:55 pm »
I kind of like exploded.

"Her coronavirus posts exploded across social media."



Perhaps slightly overstated, but it works! Did you suggest that in your letter to the editors?






Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2875 on: October 07, 2021, 04:09:47 pm »

Perhaps slightly overstated, but it works! Did you suggest that in your letter to the editors?

Actually I forgot I even threatened to write.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2876 on: October 08, 2021, 09:04:09 pm »
Here's another New Yorker sentence that bothers me. I can't think of a word to describe how I feel about it, but it annoys me.

"At the breakfast in Mayfair, carefully coiffed women picked at avocado toast and sipped cappuccinos. ..."

(From Rebecca Mead's profile of the designer Harris Reed, Sept. 27, p. 55.)

Maybe condescending is the word I'm trying to think of?
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2877 on: October 09, 2021, 05:17:19 pm »
Here's another New Yorker sentence that bothers me. I can't think of a word to describe how I feel about it, but it annoys me.

"At the breakfast in Mayfair, carefully coiffed women picked at avocado toast and sipped cappuccinos. ..."

(From Rebecca Mead's profile of the designer Harris Reed, Sept. 27, p. 55.)

Maybe condescending is the word I'm trying to think of?


Hmm. Trying to think if I share that reaction or whether it's simply an accurate description of the surroundings. "Carefully coiffed" does seem a bit contemptuous, and "picked" and "sipped" are a bit more judgmental than "ate" and "drank." And unless at least the majority of women were eating avocado toast, that in itself seems to be saying something below the surface.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2878 on: October 09, 2021, 09:30:37 pm »
Hmm. Trying to think if I share that reaction or whether it's simply an accurate description of the surroundings. "Carefully coiffed" does seem a bit contemptuous, and "picked" and "sipped" are a bit more judgmental than "ate" and "drank." And unless at least the majority of women were eating avocado toast, that in itself seems to be saying something below the surface.

Thanks. Contemptuous is the word I wanted but couldn't think of. (That seems to be happening a lot these days.  :(  )

And here's another New Yorker-ism that annoys me: From time to time I see authors use acronyms but don't spell them out. The latest I've seen is in John Seabrook's article on nonalcoholic beer (Sept. 27). In the second paragraph he uses the acronym "I.P.A." He also uses "N.A.," but it's pretty easy to figure that one out as "non-alcoholic," but what is "I.P.A."? Is that something beer drinkers would know, or drinkers of non-alcoholic beer?

At least I learned that O'Doul's is a non-alcoholic beer. I've heard of it didn't know it was non-alcoholic.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2879 on: October 10, 2021, 01:41:26 pm »
Thanks. Contemptuous is the word I wanted but couldn't think of. (That seems to be happening a lot these days.  :(  )

And here's another New Yorker-ism that annoys me: From time to time I see authors use acronyms but don't spell them out. The latest I've seen is in John Seabrook's article on nonalcoholic beer (Sept. 27). In the second paragraph he uses the acronym "I.P.A." He also uses "N.A.," but it's pretty easy to figure that one out as "non-alcoholic," but what is "I.P.A."? Is that something beer drinkers would know, or drinkers of non-alcoholic beer?

At least I learned that O'Doul's is a non-alcoholic beer. I've heard of it didn't know it was non-alcoholic.


My neighbors and i forget words and names often. I said I?d heard that if you can think of it within 15 minutes you?re OK. So when we do it ? which is frequently ? someone will pretend to look at their watch, set a timer, etc. We almost always think of it in less than 5. It?s weird that when one person forgets a word, often others do, too.

One time one of us texted the name to the others a couple of hours later. We were trying to think of the presidential candidate who fooled around and for some reason challenged the press to try to find evidence. They immediately uncovered a photo of him on a boat called Monkey Business. Knowing all that does his name come immediately to you?

When I?m sitting alone at a computer I cheat and google.

IPA stands for India Pale Ale, a popular, hoppy beer. Well known among beer drinkers and carried by many or maybe most breweries. Still, I agree he should have spelled it out in first reference. Obviously TNY doesn?t follow AP style, but does it follow another style or just have its own?