Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 1238787 times)

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2910 on: November 25, 2021, 09:35:44 pm »
I thought this holiday I might catch up on my magazines; I brought two issues along with me to my dad's. Instead all I've read has been the latest Longmire novel.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2911 on: November 27, 2021, 02:25:50 pm »
I was reading about the biography of Elizabeth Hardwick in the November 22 issue, where it says she grew up in the South, and later it pinpoints her origin to around Lexington, Kentucky. I don't think of that as the South, do you? It is only 50 miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio.

The article also insinuates that she follows the traditions of Southern writers. Well, from the examples mentioned, she does use a style similar to Faulkner, verbose, with many adjectives. What else characterizes Southern writing? Has anyone read her work?

I enjoyed the review and also the one by Jill Lepore of a book about weeks and the history of the calendar. Native Americans had 13 months in a year, corresponding to the phases of the moon. That way each of the months is 28 days, bringing more consistency. I haven't read the review of a new biography of H. G. Wells yet.

The profile of new operatic singer Dav?ne Tines was thrilling, and, with my interest in genealogy, I ate up the article about its use in forensics. The profile of Kristen Stewart, the "Twilight" actress, was surprisngly interesting.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2912 on: November 27, 2021, 10:40:56 pm »
I was reading about the biography of Elizabeth Hardwick in the November 22 issue, where it says she grew up in the South, and later it pinpoints her origin to around Lexington, Kentucky. I don't think of that as the South, do you? It is only 50 miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio.

I do think of Kentucky as the South. Not the Deep South, though.

Quote
The article also insinuates that she follows the traditions of Southern writers. Well, from the examples mentioned, she does use a style similar to Faulkner, verbose, with many adjectives. What else characterizes Southern writing?

I think of Faulkner as dense, familial and kind of Gothic. When I read The Sound and the Fury I had the Cliff Notes at my elbow. The only other time I've used them is when reading Hamlet.

So there's also Flannery O'Connor, Tennessee Williams, Zora Neale Hurston, Truman Capote, Harper Lee, Eudora Welty, Walker Percy, Robert Penn Warren ...

Quote
Has anyone read her work?

Not me.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2913 on: November 28, 2021, 07:07:54 pm »
I do think of Kentucky as the South. Not the Deep South, though.

I do, too.

Quote
So there's also Flannery O'Connor, Tennessee Williams, Zora Neale Hurston, Truman Capote, Harper Lee, Eudora Welty, Walker Percy, Robert Penn Warren ...

Margaret Mitchell. ...

Harper Lee and Truman Capote were the answer/question for Final Jeopardy recently.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2914 on: December 02, 2021, 12:13:25 am »
I do, too.

Margaret Mitchell. ...

Harper Lee and Truman Capote were the answer/question for Final Jeopardy recently.


I bet I can imagine the answer/question. Something about how they lived near each other, one was the basis for a character in the other's book, they were friends into adulthood and she accompanied him to do the reporting for In Cold Blood.




Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2915 on: December 02, 2021, 10:49:15 am »
I bet I can imagine the answer/question. Something about how they lived near each other, one was the basis for a character in the other's book, they were friends into adulthood and she accompanied him to do the reporting for In Cold Blood.

More or less. I think it had something to do with two Southern authors who were the basis for two characters (Scout and Dill) in an acclaimed novel written by one of them.

The implication (that I've never heard before) is that Harper Lee herself was the basis for Scout. I'd heard that Capote was the basis for Dill.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2916 on: December 03, 2021, 01:50:21 pm »
More or less. I think it had something to do with two Southern authors who were the basis for two characters (Scout and Dill) in an acclaimed novel written by one of them.

The implication (that I've never heard before) is that Harper Lee herself was the basis for Scout. I'd heard that Capote was the basis for Dill.

I'd heard both but did they say the names Scout and Dill? In which case I probably would have gotten it (though I might think Dill was the brother's name). Otherwise I'd be thinking about siblings or married couples.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2917 on: December 03, 2021, 10:55:28 pm »
I'd heard both but did they say the names Scout and Dill? In which case I probably would have gotten it (though I might think Dill was the brother's name). Otherwise I'd be thinking about siblings or married couples.

They only said the character names after all the contestants' responses had been revealed. The characters' names were not part of the clue.

The brother's name was Jem.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2918 on: December 05, 2021, 07:44:58 pm »
I enjoyed the review and also the one by Jill Lepore of a book about weeks and the history of the calendar. Native Americans had 13 months in a year, corresponding to the phases of the moon. That way each of the months is 28 days, bringing more consistency. I haven't read the review of a new biography of H. G. Wells yet.

This was in the November 22 issue. A few more things about the number 13: Native Americans constructed their tipis with 13 poles. Women's cycles are every 28 days, so 13 times per year. As the article points  out, there were 13 states in the original U.S. But, as Lepore writes, the number 13 was awkward mathematically. I disagree.

I'd also like to mention Nick Paumgarten's article on energy in the November 8 issue. It had a boring start for me but it picked up when he talked about wearables like Oura and the Whoop. They work at night too and I've been wondering what I could do to improve my sleep quality. My doctor wants me to take an expensive sleep test that is not covered by insurance. I'd like to use more low-tech ways to improve my sleep.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2919 on: Yesterday at 09:46:25 am »
Women's cycles are every 28 days.

Of course, that's an average.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.