Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 567908 times)

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #540 on: September 03, 2012, 05:18:49 pm »
Your reading patterns over the years are interesting. I take a different approach...I usually begin with Talk of the Town at the beginning and barrel right through to the critical reviews at the end. If I skip anything, it's usually the fiction. I also skip political stories, especially during election season, and sometimes Middle East or Africa stories.

This odd approach means that I'm sometimes not done with an issue when the new one comes. When that happens, I drop the half-read issue by the side of my bed and take up the new issue. I save the half-read issue for long winter nights or if I get sick.

I rarely read the fiction, but when the annual fiction issue comes out I force myself to read at least a few of the stories. Why? I think you know why...not a single story has hit me with anything near the force of our beloved Brokeback Mountain. The state of fiction today seems to be pretty sad to me. Sir Arthur is the Boyle I prefer to read, rather than T. C.
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #541 on: September 03, 2012, 07:25:00 pm »
I have something terrible to confess: I never really "get" Alice Munro. She's revered among all writers, but I read her stories and come to the end and think, "OK, so?" I know -- shameful! Also, from what I've read of her she sounds very nice. I'd probably like her. What's wrong with me?

I read her for the tone. I think the latest evokes what must have been the very chilly atmosphere of World War II-era Canada. Most of her stories also seem to take place in small towns, and as a kid I spent a lot of time in the small town where my parents grew up, so I sort of relate to that atmosphere. I don't know if that qualifies as "getting" her, but there you have it.

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Shouts and Murmurs (unless I start them and they seem too far-fetched -- I love Bob Odenkirk on Breaking Bad, but his recent S&M lost me midway through).

I'n't that funny? I almost never read "Shouts and Murmurs." I don't really know why. Maybe I've just read too many of them that struck me as, well, dumb.  :-\

Sir Arthur is the Boyle I prefer to read, rather than T. C.

Who's Sir Arthur Boyle? What did he write?  ???
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #542 on: September 03, 2012, 07:45:25 pm »


Who's Sir Arthur Boyle? What did he write?  ???

Sir Arthur [Conan D]oyle, maybe!


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #543 on: September 03, 2012, 09:05:29 pm »
Most assuredly, Dr. Watson!!
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #544 on: September 03, 2012, 09:43:36 pm »
I'n't that funny? I almost never read "Shouts and Murmurs." I don't really know why. Maybe I've just read too many of them that struck me as, well, dumb.  :-\


I know. Many of them strike me as dumb, too.

But I'll have to say, the most recent one (or the most recent one I've seen -- the one with little pictures of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan on the front, I think it's Sept. 3) had me laughing out loud numerous times. It's titled "How to Win at Conversation" or something like that. Still, the parts that struck me the funniest, oddly, aren't the punchlines of each section, but the second lines of each section.

Years on years ago, I saw a S&M that was so amazing I clipped and saved it (not forever, unfortunately). It was a little story about a guy going to a party that was packed with positive versions of verbs and adjectives we almost exclusively use the negative versions of. "Plussed" instead of "nonplussed," for example. Chalant. Nerving. And so on.

In subsequent years, I've tried in vain to find it again. I don't remember the author and have no idea how I'd search for it.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #545 on: September 03, 2012, 09:52:00 pm »
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #546 on: September 03, 2012, 09:54:31 pm »
Years on years ago, I saw a S&M that was so amazing I clipped and saved it (not forever, unfortunately). It was a little story about a guy going to a party that was packed with positive versions of verbs and adjectives we almost exclusively use the negative versions of. "Plussed" instead of "nonplussed," for example. Chalant. Nerving. And so on.

In subsequent years, I've tried in vain to find it again. I don't remember the author and have no idea how I'd search for it.

I don't remember that one, but I'd wager "kempt" was probably at that party, too.

Of course I do have to stop and replus myself when I see it referred to as "S&M." That generally means something else where I come from.  ;D
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #547 on: September 03, 2012, 10:40:43 pm »
Loved the "Bromance" cover in this week's issue. And "How to Win at Conversations" by Paul Simms made me laugh out loud!! (LOL)  :laugh:

As you can see, Katherine, we're definitely on the same page!
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #548 on: September 03, 2012, 11:53:00 pm »
As you can see, Katherine, we're definitely on the same page!

Hey yeah! I didn't know what you were referring to before today.


I don't remember that one, but I'd wager "kempt" was probably at that party, too.

Bet you're right!

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Of course I do have to stop and replus myself when I see it referred to as "S&M." That generally means something else where I come from.  ;D

For a moment, I considered calling it a Shout and Murmur, singular.


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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #549 on: September 10, 2012, 01:18:59 pm »
How timely is the article on the making of CLOUD ATLAS in the latest issue! It's great to read all about the brother/sister duo who made the movie as well as the Matrix series. At the debut in Toronto (covered in another thread here in the Culture Tent), Lana had her first credit as a director. Before this she was listed as Larry.
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